Author Topic: Drug-smuggling British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia  (Read 1589 times)

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Offline Johnnie F.

Drug-smuggling British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia

    Lindsay Sandiford, 56, was stopped with cocaine worth £1.6m in suitcase
    She was arrested in May but said she had been coerced into carrying drugs


A British grandmother has been sentenced to death for smuggling almost 5kg of cocaine into Bali in her suitcase.

Lindsay Sandiford, from Gloucestershire, was arrested in May last year following a routine customs check by police into Indonesia who found £1.6million worth of the Class A substance.

The 56-year-old, would be spared execution because of her age and for her co-operation with authorities on the holiday isle.
Nervous wait: Prosecutors on the holiday island of Bali said they would ask for 15 years jail for the 56-year-old because of her co-operation in a major drug smuggling case, but it is up to three judges

Shocked: An Indonesian court has sentenced Briton Lindsay Sandiford to death for drug smuggling
Caught: Despite Mrs Sandiford allegedly 'coming clean' and telling police who her contacts were, officers were unable to find any physical evidence to connect the grandmother with the three suspects

Sandiford is one of a 'British gang of four’ who were linked by customs officials and police after the grandmother tried to smuggle £1.6million of cocaine into the country from Thailand.

In its verdict, a judge panel headed by Amser Simanjuntak concluded that Sandiford has damaged the image of Bali as a tourism destination and weakened the government's program of drug annihilation.

The usual sentence for the amount of cocaine found in the lining of her suitcase – 4.8kg – is execution and sources did claim following a hearing last month that judges would still have the right to impose that penalty.

Prosecutors had sought a 15-year jail term for Sandiford.

She had been linked with antiques restorer Julian Ponder, 43, from Brighton, his 39-year-old partner Rachel Dougall and 39-year-old Paul Beales, who were also arrested.

Dougall received a one-year jail sentence in the Denpasar District Court last month.

She could be on her way back to the UK by April, to be reunited with her daughter, because she had already been in jail for eight months awaiting trial.

Beales, a long-time Bali resident, was also spared a heavy penalty when judges sentenced him to four years for possession of a small amount of hashish.

Daily Mail
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Offline thaiga

Re: British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia - video
« Reply #1 on: January 22, 2013, 06:28:05 PM »
 You have to feel sorry for her, what a stupid thing to do.


Bali Brit Woman Lindsay Sandiford Sentenced To Death For Drugs.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline nookiebear

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Re: Drug-smuggling British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia
« Reply #2 on: January 23, 2013, 06:23:09 AM »
Play with fire, especially in the countries that carry the death penalty for drugs & you'll get your fingers burnt.
Got the sentence she deserved,,,,,hopefully the others involved will get the same
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Offline thaiga

Re: British grandmother sentenced to death ♦ death row in a bali jail
« Reply #3 on: January 23, 2013, 06:48:34 PM »
DEATH ROW IN A BALI JAIL: LIFE IN THE NOTORIOUS KEROBOKAN PRISON



Kerobokan prison is in the Bali capital, Denpasar, and has been nicknamed 'hell on earth' by many who have been sent there.

It has notoriously poor conditions, with its white-washed walls, topped with barbed wire, all  stained with mildew, while inside it is unmercifully claustrophobic.

Crowded cells are filled with all manner of criminals of all nationalities and unless friends and relatives bring food, they must sustain themselves on meals of prison gruel.

And for those on death row, the procedure they follow is depressingly familiar at the prison where at least two of the Bali bombers were executed by firing squad.

On their last day they will be woken early — certainly before dawn — handcuffed to prison officers and led out of the jail for the last time to a van.

It will travel through the deserted streets before cutting down a jungle track and  stopping close to a beach or orchard.

From that point on, every chilling step is spelled out in Indonesia’s 1964 death penalty regulations, known as Penetapan Presiden No 2.

The regulations state: ‘Once arriving at the place of their death, the condemned is blindfolded (although they can choose not to be).’

Most prisoners ask to die standing up, their hands tied behind their backs to a pole, but they can also choose to sit or lie down.

A ten or twenty-member squad of the Indonesian Mobile Brigade, who have passed psychological tests to ready them for the task, will be assigned to shoot a prisoner.

But in order to preserve their sanity, only two of them will have live 5.5mm bullets, the rest being blanks.

None of the firing squad knows who has actually fired the fatal shot to the heart, but having only two live bullets means, of course, that instant death is not necessarily guaranteed.

In that case, the law states that: ‘If after the shooting the condemned still shows signs they are not yet dead, the Commander immediately gives the order to the head of the firing squad to let off a tembakan pengakhir (a coup de grace) by pressing the barrel of the gun against the temple of the condemned, right above their ear,’ and firing.

Indonesia does not reveal how many prisoners have been executed, but human rights groups have confirmed that in 2009, the country executed 13 people, three of the Bali bombers in 2008, one person in 2007 and three in 2006.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: Drug-smuggling British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia
« Reply #4 on: January 24, 2013, 12:02:46 PM »
At least the rules of the game are very clear. If you can't do the time then don't do the crime.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Drug-smuggling British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia
« Reply #5 on: January 24, 2013, 02:42:55 PM »


she wont be doing any time   unless they miss
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: British grandmother is sentenced to death ♦ suing the UK goverment
« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2013, 11:32:35 AM »
Briton Julian Ponder facing Bali court drugs verdict

An Indonesian court is due to deliver its verdict in the case of a British man accused of drug offences.

Julian Ponder was cleared of smuggling but faces a lesser charge of possession which carries a life sentence.

Ponder was one of three Britons detained after Lindsay Sandiford, 56, from Cheltenham, was arrested for smuggling cocaine into Bali last year.

Sandiford was sentenced to death and is suing the UK Foreign Office for not supporting her appeal.

Prosecutors in Bali are seeking a seven-year prison term for Mr Ponder.

The two other Britons were also cleared of trafficking and received sentences of four years and one year each.

Sandiford, 56, from Cheltenham, was arrested on drugs charges in May 2012 and sentenced to death by firing squad last week by a panel of judges at the district court in Denpasar, Bali.

She claimed she had been coerced into carrying a suitcase into the country by criminals who threatened her family.

Legal charity Reprieve said the UK government was in breach of its obligations to Sandiford as a British citizen.

Reprieve said Sandiford, originally from Redcar, Teesside, had no money for an appeal after exhausting her family's finances to pay for a lawyer for her trial.

Charitable donations

The charity said the appeal involved filing a complicated legal document in Indonesian, which she does not speak, by 12 February.

Reprieve, and solicitors Leigh Day & Co, have filed a judicial review in the UK on Ms Sandiford's behalf against the Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

This argues that: "In failing to make arrangements for an adequate lawyer to represent the claimant's interests the defendant is acting unlawfully, in breach of its obligations as a matter of EU law, to take all reasonable steps to ensure that she does not face the death penalty, is not subjected to inhumane and degrading treatment, is not tortured and receives a fair trial."

Reprieve said Sandiford was relying on charitable donations for basic provisions such as food and water.

Sandiford was sentenced to death despite the prosecution seeking a 15-year sentence.

Harriet McCulloch, from Reprieve, said: "Everyone knows that capital punishment means that those without the capital get the punishment. Lindsay's poverty means that she has ended up sentenced to death after a manifestly unfair trial."

Sandiford's MP, Martin Horwood, called on the Foreign Office to review its policy on Britons facing the death penalty abroad.

The Foreign Office said the UK government did not fund legal representation abroad but Sandiford's case was being dealt with through diplomatic channels.

Julian Ponder had the more serious charge against him of drug dealing dropped
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Julian Ponder jailed for six years for Bali drug possession

A British man has been jailed for six years in Bali for drug offences.

Julian Ponder, 43, from Brighton, was cleared of smuggling but was convicted of possessing 23g of cocaine which carried a maximum sentence of life.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-21240673
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Drug-smuggling British grandmother is sentenced to death in Indonesia
« Reply #8 on: February 11, 2013, 09:28:26 PM »


Briton appeals Bali death sentence

A British grandmother sentenced to death by firing squad for trafficking drugs into Indonesia lodged an appeal to the High Court on Monday, her lawyer said.

Lindsay Sandiford, 56, was sentenced to death on January 22 for smuggling nearly five kilos (11 pounds) of cocaine worth $2.4 million (71.6m baht) into the island of Bali in May, despite prosecutors recommending only a 15-year jail term.

"We've made an appeal to the High Court, and we'll wait for one month to 90 days for a response," Sandiford's lawyer Fadillah Agus told reporters outside Denpasar district court.

He said the death sentence "was not fair" and "not proportional" because Sandiford had cooperated with police to net four others in the drug ring, including three Britons who received far lighter sentences for their roles.

Sandiford appointed Agus as her lawyer last week after losing a High Court bid in London to make the British government pay for a lawyer to help her appeal, which the charity Reprieve estimated would cost 2,500 pounds (118,000 baht).

Judges in London dismissed Sandiford's bid, saying her case had "no reasonable prospect of success", drawing criticism from rights groups against capital punishment.

Agus said Sandiford was "scared" of her fate, while the drug ring's "real mastermind", whom he did not identify, had received a lesser sentence.

Julian Ponder received the harshest punishment of the other Britons arrested, sentenced to six years' jail.

Sandiford argued she was forced into transporting the 4.79 kilos of cocaine to protect her children, whose safety was at stake. But the Bali court rejected her claims, saying she had damaged the island's reputation as a tourism destination.

Sandiford can appeal to the Supreme Court if the High Court rejects her bid. After that, only the president can grant her a reprieve.

If all avenues of appeal are explored, the entire process can take years. Two Australians from a group of heroin smugglers known as the Bali Nine have been on death row since 2006 and are now appealing for presidential clemency.

Indonesia has not executed anyone since 2008 but has announced plans to resume executions this year.

bangkokpost
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Bali court upholds death sentence for British grandmother
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2013, 03:34:40 PM »


DENPASAR, April 8, 2013 (AFP) - An Indonesian court on Monday upheld the death sentence handed down to a 56-year-old British grandmother found guilty of trafficking cocaine into the resort island of Bali.

A spokesman said the Bali High Court, sitting in the island’s capital Denpasar, upheld the death sentence given to Lindsay Sandiford in January, which had been a shock verdict after prosecutors recommended 15 years imprisonment.

The judges ruled the original decision of the Denpasar district court was
“accurate and correct,” said spokesman Makkasau, who like many Indonesians goes by one name, adding that Sandiford would be informed of the decision as soon as possible.

Indonesian police say she was at the centre of a drugs importing ring involving three other Britons after a drugs haul worth $2.4 million was found in her suitcase as she arrived on a flight from Bangkok last May.

The high court gave her 14 days to appeal to the Supreme Court starting from the day she is informed of the verdict.

If the Supreme Court rejects her appeal, she can seek a judicial review of the decision from the same court. After that, only the president can grant her a reprieve.

Sandiford had argued that she was forced into transporting the 4.79 kilos (10.6 pounds) of cocaine in order to protect her children whose safety was at stake.

But the court ruled that she had not admitted her crime and had damaged Indonesia’s hardline stance on drugs as well as Bali’s reputation as a tourism destination.

It rejected the argument that Sandiford had acted to protect her children, and said there were “no mitigating circumstances” to allow for leniency.

British human rights charity Reprieve claimed before Sandiford was sentenced to death that she had been “exploited by drug traffickers, who targeted her because of her vulnerability and her fear for the safety of her children”.

Britain raised objections at the time of her sentencing, with junior foreign minister Hugo Swire saying: “We strongly object to the death penalty.”

London also raised concerns in February that Indonesian authorities mistreated Sandiford in prison, alleging in a submission to the Denpasar district court she was threatened with a gun and deprived of sleep.

Three other Britons arrested in connection with the case received lighter sentences.

Julian Ponder was sentenced in January to six years in jail after being found guilty of possessing 23.04 grams (0.8 ounces) of cocaine with a street value of $6,000, found in the bedroom of his luxury Bali villa.

He was arrested after receiving a package from Sandiford in a police sting mounted after she was caught with the cocaine in her suitcase.

Rachel Dougall was sentenced to 12 months for failing to report Sandiford’s crime and Paul Beales received four years for possession of 3.6 grams of hashish but was cleared of drug trafficking. They were sentenced in December.

Indonesia enforces stiff penalties for drug trafficking, but death penalty sentences are commonly commuted to long jail sentences.

Two members of an Australian drug smuggling gang known as the “Bali Nine” who were arrested in 2005 are currently on death row, while the seven others face lengthy jail terms. A French man has also been on death row since May 2007.

Executions in Indonesia are carried out by firing squad, usually at night in isolated and undisclosed locations. The country carried out its first execution for several years last month when it put to death a Malawian drug trafficker.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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