Author Topic: Under the proposal, driving without a licence maximum fine 50,000 baht  (Read 260 times)

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Offline thaiga

Harsh new penalties for unlicensed driving 'not yet law'

Police and the Land Transport Department have come out to allay motorists' worries about harsher penalties for driving without a licence or an invalid one.

Pol Maj Gen Ekkarak Limsangkat, who sits in a police panel to solve traffic issues, said on Wednesday here was no need for panic as the new penalties were not yet enshrined in law.

The department also issued a statement explaining the process.

Drivers have cried foul on social media about the huge increase in fines or jail terms since the move was unveiled by the department.

At present, driving without a licence carries a maximum penalty of 1,000 baht and/or one month in jail.

Motorists face a maximum fine of 2,000 baht if they drive when their licence has expired, been seized or withdrawn from use.

The penalties are set down in two laws -- the Vehicle Act BE 2522 (1979) and Land Transport Act BE 2522 (1979).

The department has proposed the cabinet merge the two laws into one, with stronger penalties.

Under the proposal, the maximum fine for driving without a licence would be increased 50-fold to 50,000 baht and the maximum jail term from one to three months. Driving with an invalid licence or when the licence has been seized or withdrawn by authorities would be hiked to a maximum 50,000 baht from the current 2,000 baht, with the added option of a three-month jail term.

The department hopes the increased penalties would make drivers better behaved on the roads, and reduce accidents and loss of lives.

But the new draft law must be sent to the cabinet for approval first. The National Legislative Assembly would also have to pass it into law, the department statement said.

Thailand has the second highest annual road traffic fatality rate in the world, at 36.2 per 100,000 people, according to the World Health Organisation. The kingdom has 66 roads deaths a day on average, it says.

bangkokpost.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Newsy

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Harsh lessons for unlicensed drivers a must

Authorities insist harsher penalties for unlicensed drivers are needed for public safety because many young unlicensed motorcyclists cause fatal accidents.

They held a press conference at the Royal Thai Police Office on Friday to respond to strong criticisms against legal amendments to punish unlicensed drivers with a jail term of up to three months or a fine of up to 50,000 baht.

Kamol Buranapong, deputy director-general of the Land Transport Department, said the amendment was aimed at raising public awareness on road safety and drivers' social responsibility.

"Research shows that 34% of unlicensed motorcyclists died in accidents. The rate is twice as much as licensed motorcyclists," he said.

"This is to instil in drivers the awareness so they strictly follow traffic rules. It will play an important role in reducing accidents and the losses of life and properties," Mr Kamol said.

The newly planned penalties under a merged law were actually slightly harsher than those of two present laws, he said. He referred to a jail term of up to one month or a fine of up to 1,000 baht under the vehicle act and a jail term of up to two years and a fine of up to 40,000 baht under the land transport act.

The proposed punishment was based on academic research and international standards, Mr Kamol said.

Dr Tanapong Jinwong from the Road Safety Thai organisation said 1,688 local people aged 15-19 died in road accidents yearly.

He also said unlicensed drivers faced a jail term of up to one year or a fine of up to 88,000 baht in Japan and a term of up to five years or a fine of up to 800,000 baht in the United States.

"The legal amendment is key to safe driving. Licensed drivers are those who have received safe driving training," he said.

Assoc Prof Kanawee Kanitpong, manager of the Thailand Accident Research Centre, said about 60% of motorcyclists had no driving licences and their accident risks were twice those of licensed motorcyclists. Most unlicensed motorcyclists were below 24 years old, he said.

Pol Maj Gen Ekarak Limsangkat, a Special Branch police commander, said that under the laws in effect today, driving without a licence was considered a minor offence with a fine of up to 1,000 baht.

As a result, they fail to deter offenders, many of whom are willing to pay fines or even continue driving without a licence, he said.
 

Online Newsy

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Courts, not police, would punish drivers without licences, public assured

 Court judges, not police officers, will determine the punishment for people caught driving without required licences, the police and Department of Land Transport (DLT) affirmed on Friday.

The authorities were responding to public concerns that a new regime of hefty fine increases and longer prison terms for motorists without licences would enable rogue traffic cops to prey on motorists. New fines of Bt10,000 to Bt50,000 and prison terms of up to five years – depending on the violation – will be sharply increased from previous penalties.

The tougher penalties raise the crimes above the standard of a petty offences and so out of the jurisdiction of police and into the hands of the courts, explained Pol Maj-General Ekkarat Limsangkat, commander of the Special Police Branch’s division 3, in a press conference.

If these proposed legal changes go into effect, the charge of driving without a licence will no longer be a petty offence, for which police can impose a fine.



Under the new regulations, officers will have to file the case in court and a judge will use his or her discretion to hand down punishment.

“The old laws that let police impose fines on drivers without licences over the past 39 years have never been effective in changing driving behaviour,” said Ekkarat. The number of people driving without a licence has only increased, as have road accidents, he noted.

Since police will no longer have the authority to fine violators, there will also be fewer rogue police officers preying on motorists, he said. In any case, he added, the Royal Thai Police (RTP) will not protect any bribe-collecting or corrupt officers and will subject them to the appropriate disciplinary and criminal code punishments.

DLT deputy director-general Kamol Buranapong said the proposed amendments would combine and update outdated laws under the Vehicle Act 1979 and the Land Transport Act 1979.

He said the old laws had set the fine rates quite high for the time they were implemented nearly 40 years ago – as is the case in other countries. It is common for countries to also have a process of keeping score related to driving behaviour, along with vehicle seizures and imprisonment for violations.

Kamol cited statistics by related agencies, including the Academic Centre for Road Safety and the Thailand Accident Research Centre, that found up to 8 million motorists and motorcyclists on Thailand’s roads drove without a licences.

Moreover, the average age at which Thais first ride motorcycles was nine, and because most are taught by family members or close acquaintances, and they often lack accurate knowledge and proper driving skills, he said.

According to DLT regulations, those aged 18 and above can get a driver’s licence to drive a motorcycle or car, and those over 15 may get a temporary licence to ride a motorcycle with a 110cc or less engine.

Citing road-accident statistics, Kamol noted that nearly 60 per cent of motorists in a crash did not have or did not carry a driver’s licence. Those without a licence were found to have double the risk of an accident, and many were under 24 years old.

The statistics clearly point to the need to implement strict driving licence-related laws to boost road safety and promote motorists’ discipline, he said.

The DLT aimed to live by the motto: “Difficult to issue, easy to confiscate”.

Kamol said the proposal was now before the Secretariat of the Cabinet which will then forward it to the National Legislative Assembly for approval.

A report outlining opinions expressed on social media about the proposed laws was also attached.

If the amended law is approved, it will be published in the Royal Gazette and come into effect one year after the publication date, giving people lots of time to get educated about the changes, he said.

Another speaker, police deputy spokesman Pol Colonel Krissana Patanacharoen said the RTP had since August 21 applied the requirement that police officers staffing checkpoints carry an ID card. They are also not permitted to wear facemasks or sunglasses when presenting themselves to search vehicles or talking with people.
 

Online Newsy

Re: PM opposes plan for higher driving licence penalties
« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2018, 10:50:54 AM »
source.link.auto.nationmultimedia.com

PM opposes plan for higher driving licence penalties

THE LAND Transport Department (LTD)’s plan to impose a much tougher

penalty on driving-licence-related offenders has hit a major snag – opposition from Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha.

“I disagree with the plan,” General Prayut announced yesterday.

Emerging from a Cabinet meeting, Prayut said the department had not been given the green light yet, adding that further discussions were necessary to determine if the plan could go through.

The LTD has proposed amendments to the Land Traffic Act of BE2522 and Automobile Act of BE2522, prescribing heavier punishment against motorists driving without a licence or with an expired/suspended/confiscated licence or failing to produce a licence when asked. The penalty for those driving without a licence, for instance, will jump from a maximum fine of Bt1,000 and/or up to one month in jail to a fine of Bt50,000 and/or up to three months in jail.

Motorists driving with an expired/suspended/confiscated licence will also be fined up to Bt50,000 and/or jailed for up to three months if convicted. The current penalty for this offence is a fine of Bt2,000.

Failure to present a valid licence when requested is now punishable with a maximum fine of Bt1,000, but the LTD hopes this penalty will be increased to Bt10,000.

Supporters of the LTD plan have been blaming offences related to driving licences for the many road accidents in the country.

“Let me tell you, you can’t blame everything on driving-licence violations,” General Prayut said.

Statistics show 60 per cent of motorcyclists drive without a licence, and most road accidents in Thailand involve motorcycles.

However, Deputy Prime Minister General Prawit Wongsuwon threw full support behind the LTD plan last week.

National Legislative Assembly (NLA) vice president Surachai Liengboonlertchai said yesterday that the LTD’s proposed amendment was now in the hands of the Council of State.

“But if the Cabinet does not endorse it, it will not come to the NLA,” Surachai explained.

 He was speaking after the Federation for the Protection of People’s Rights called on him to scrap the LTD draft law.

The federation’s president Worakorn Pongthanakul said the proposed amendment, if endorsed, would deal a big blow on low-income earners, who could face a hefty fine if they forget to carry their licence.

Meanwhile, a senior government spokesman said the Cabinet agreed with the idea of considering big bikes separately in terms of licences.

A proposal said that in order to reduce road accidents, users of big bikes would be treated differently and provided with more training and special licences.

Members of the big bike community quoted Government Spokesman Lt-General Sansern Kaewkamnerd as saying that the government was ready to adjust a related 2005 law. Speaking after a ministerial level meeting in Chumphon province, he said that in future those applying for a licence to ride a big bike would have to take a separate test and will be given a different licence. It is still unclear as to what is considered a “big bike”.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: the will of the people do they want the right to kill themselves
« Reply #4 on: August 30, 2018, 04:58:39 PM »
Are the government backing down to the will of the people


pic@ thairath.co.th

Are the government backing down to the will of the people, do the people have the right to kill themselves, an article from thairath.co.th gives that impression

Initiatives that were forced to be abandoned as the people protested and won the day.

Proposals to ban sitting in the back of pick-ups
Shelved as ignored by the people they carry on as usual

The Single Internet Gateway
Abandoned

Heavy fines and jail terms for people without road licenses
Looking likely to go the same way

Thai Rath saying the changes, initiatives that were for the good of the Thai people were being abandoned because they were refusing to obey laws they didn't want to obey.

A clear message, Lawlessness refusal to follow the rules set out by the government.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Newsy

Re: Most oppose heavier driving licence penalties: Nida Poll
« Reply #5 on: September 03, 2018, 11:11:47 AM »
source.link.auto.bangkokpost.com

Most oppose heavier driving licence penalties: Nida Poll

A majority of people disagree with a proposal to impose heavier penalties on people driving without a licence or with an expired licence, saying the proposed penalties are too high and unlikely to help reduce road accidents, according to an opinion survey conducted by the National Institute for Development Administration, or Nida Poll.

The poll was carried out on Aug 27-28 on 1,251 people aged 15 and over of various levels of education and occupations throughout the country to compile their opinions on mooted heavier penalties for drivers not holding a valid licence.

The Department of Land Transport wants to amend the traffic law to impose a jail term not exceeding three months and a fine not exceeding 50,000 baht on people driving without a driving licence or with an expired driving licence.

Drivers who possess a valid license but are found not carrying it would be liable to a fine of not more than 10,000 baht.

Asked for their opinion on the proposed higher penalties for driving without a licence or with an expired licence, 71.54% disagreed with the proposal; 28.30% agreed with it; and 0.16% were uncertain or had no comment.

As for the proposed heavier fine for not carrying a driving licence while driving, 67.47% disagreed, 32.05% agreed and 0.48% were uncertain or had no comment.

Those who disagreed said the proposed fines were too high and would not help reduce road accidents, saying the increased penalties would not address the root causes of the problem.

Asked to name traffic violations that should be liable to heavier penalties, 66.43% cited drink-driving; 11.11% running a red right; 10.23% driving over the speed limit; 3.12% turning or switching lanes without signalling; and 2.16% obstructing traffic. Other violations mentioned were driving on pavements and overtaking on the left without due cause.
 

Online Newsy

Re: Transport dept seeks opinions on harsh new penalties
« Reply #6 on: September 07, 2018, 11:18:21 AM »
source.link.auto.bangkokpost.com

Transport dept seeks opinions on harsh new penalties

The Land Transport Department is sounding out public reaction to the planned 5,000% hike in the fine for driving without a licence.

The department is inviting people to express their feelings about the proposal on its website, from now until Sept 11.

"All opinions will be gathered and taken into account during the process to consider the draft bill," the department announcement said.

The department plans to amend the law to increase penalties for driving without a licence or with an expired licence as part of its campaign to reduce road accidents.

Currently, driving without a licence carries a maximum penalty of 1,000 baht and/or one month in jail.

Motorists face a maximum fine of 2,000 baht if they drive when their licence has expired, been seized or withdrawn from use.

Under the proposal, the maximum fine for driving without a licence would be increased 50-fold to 50,000 baht and the maximum jail term from one to three months.

Driving with an invalid licence or when the licence has been seized or withdrawn by authorities would be raised to a maximum 50,000 baht from the current 2,000 baht, with the added option of a three-month jail term.

The plan was generally greeted with public opposition when initially announced. Even Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha questioned the increase.

Gen Prayut said on Aug 28 he disagreed with the idea and demanded a thorough study of all elements of the proposal from the department. He said he would not approve the amendment as it is if presented to the cabinet.

A Nida poll by the National Institute of Development Administration released on Sunday also showed a majority of people felt the punishment was too harsh, and were not convinced it would reduce the number of accidents on the roads.

The department tried to ease concern, saying on the website that the process was just at the beginning,  with several steps to be taken before the final decision is made.
 

 



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