Author Topic: The worst countries in the world for driving  (Read 246 times)

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Offline thaiga

The worst countries in the world for driving
« on: March 11, 2018, 01:02:48 PM »
I have lived and worked in a number of countries over the years, all of which have worse driving habits than Thailand:- Saudi Arabia, Libya, Malaysia and Italy.  Roads in Thailand are quite relaxed by comparison.  I always feel relaxed driving in Thailand, the numbers of real idiots are quite small.  A really bad place to drive is the UK where you are liable to find yourself up before the magistrates for even minor infractions of the law.  The roads in Thailand are what they are, not how you would like them to be.


Bouncing of t/t s post in the thread driving in Thailand there are worst countries in the world for driving than Thailand, some might think Thailand is bad but have never been to other countries, so wouldn't know. From looking at the vid would you rather drive here in Thailand or some where like india. Italy is even worse and they don't stop honking their horn, nobody takes any notice anyway.

A total mess and absolute chaos is every day life and accepted by the people, even in this day and age. they call it new delhi, what was the old one like then. No discipline,poorly educated,no police to be seen no rules. The game being where ever you live, get use to it, no good moaning about nothing you can do. Next time you go out for an indian you know why he's smiling, he's out of it.

Daily life in India - driving in traffic in Delhi ( India )
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: The worst countries in the world for driving
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2018, 01:57:48 PM »
Thaiga, I didn’t include India in the list of dangerous countries because it actually isn’t too bad.  Sure, it is chaotic but there is very little aggressive driving.  It is more like Thailand in that you have to be prepared for the unexpected.  Stray cows (holy) roaming the roads, horses and carts, tractors and trailers, camels and carts etc. 
It is interesting to compare Malaysia and Thailand.  I was regular traveler between Kuala Lumpur and Penang along a lovely modern motorway (freeway).  Despite the road being built to high safety standards there were frequent bad accidents due to crazy drivers. 
By comparison, the road from Korat to Bangkok is about the most dangerous you could possibly imagine:- U turns on the fast lane and continual entrance and exit of frontage roads.  Despite this, there do not seem to be that many accidents along there.  Most seem to involve badly laden lorries falling into the ditch.  If Malaysian drivers were let loose on Korat – Bangkok it would be absolute carnage. 
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The worst countries in the world for driving
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2018, 04:47:50 PM »
Thank you t/t for the info - can't see any swords or baseball bats  :)

Malaysians Driver during Traffic Congestion
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

look what i found on theaposition.com

What Thailand Can Teach The World

“Road rage” simply doesn’t exist in Thailand and incredibly you will seldom hear honking in spite of the traffic!

In my travels, I’ve discovered that you can learn much about a people by observing the way they drive. In Germany, everyone driving a reasonably speed respectfully stays out of the fast lane because on certain roads, there is no speed limit and the faster drivers will often operate their vehicles over 140 m.p.h. In Italy or New York, everyone aggressively drives like a race car driver and the Americans are so impatient that “road rage” is a genuine concern. In India, you will nearly always find six lanes of traffic covering four lanes and they use their horn for everything – not so much as an item of frustration but as a signal to other drivers. I am not exaggerating when I claim that on the busy roads around New Delhi you will experience at least 300 horns blasts per minute. Then there is Thailand. The Thai don’t use their horns at all. It is not too far fetched to speculate that an auto manufacturer could leave the horn out of the Thai cars and few would notice.

In Thailand the use of the automobile horn is considered rude and provocative, if not downright offensive. And if you hear a quick “pip, pip” of the horn (never a long blast), it is done as a thank you. I am not saying the Thai are better drivers or that driving is safe there, but the Thai are among the most courteous and polite drivers anywhere – and they reflect that as a people too.

It was my third trip to Thailand and if you’ve ever been in the Bangkok area, you appreciate that like New York City, Rome, or New Delhi, the streets are jammed with traffic among the world’s most congested. Only in Thailand and Bangkok for example, it is curiously quiet of automobile horns. Thus I inquired about this more than once, but the answer was always the same. “We are a kind, peaceful, respectful, courteous people and we are more apt to stop than to challenge another driver.” “Using a horn would not be respectful of one another.” “No one is in such a hurry that they cannot afford to wait for their fellow man as a sign of courtesy and respect.” In a land where the natives don’t only bow for guests or tourists, but also for each other, it began to make perfect sense. My hosts and others went on to explain that even where safety might be involved, it’s very unlikely a Thai driver would use their horn. Instead they would probably just stop. Now consciously aware of this, I noticed the lack of honking the remainder of my trip. After all, this was not something somebody was doing for me to impress me as a travel writer, but rather a genuine way of life so integral to the Thai people.

Anyone who has visited Thailand probably has left with a special feeling about the Thai people. It is the “Land of Smiles;” they are warm, patient, courteous, non-confrontational, and oh so respectful. If you play golf as I have, the women caddies who with their warm, fun personalities are unique and make an indelible impression. And on the highways, the drivers are oh so courteous. It all makes for a special blend of people and culture and assurance that your trip to Thailand will be a most enjoyable one. And should you hear someone honking, there’s a very good chance it’s a foreigner. Yes, this courtesy is something the rest of the World could model from Thailand!
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: The worst countries in the world for driving
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2018, 06:12:01 PM »
Nice one, Thaiga. 

My office in Riyadh is at an intersection and there is much honking of horns and screeching of tyres all day long.  The other day there was a screeching of tyres followed by an ominous crash.  I looked out of the window and both drivers were getting out of their cars.  What happened next?  They shook hands.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 
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