Author Topic: Driving in thailand  (Read 39459 times)

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Offline Roger

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Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #210 on: March 13, 2018, 01:18:32 PM »
Hi BF. Long time no see. Hope you are OK. We've crossed swords before on driving matters and I'm sorry, but I just couldn't resist giving you my view on this  :punch

The video you posted in Reply 199 - it looks to me that you are already closing quite fast on the pick-up ahead in your lane, who is about to overtake the bus. Indeed it seems that you then accelerate to close the gap, no doubt having detected the cheeky Subaru coming on the inside  ;)

Not slowing at all for the hazard situation you see developing. Far from it, (it's personal with this Subaru blighter), you blaze through the turning lane and fortunately, the vehicle about to turn had conceded you space.

Cheeky Subaru. Aggressive BF ! For the safety of yourself and yours, I'd calm it down BF.
I commented before about your 13 accidents - that's a lot M8. Take some of the advice your other KF's have offered ? Adjust ?

The train horn is not a good idea apart from being illegal. In that video, you say you didn't have time for the train horn ? What ? No left hand wing mirror ? You were racing M8 ;)

I don't want to dollop you off but take care eh ? ATB

 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #211 on: March 13, 2018, 01:44:21 PM »
A much better post b/f explains how you feel. yes, that also includes some foreigners here who really have adapted to the ways of bad road behavior. must agree with that. also Everyone came out to help everyone laying sand bags. community spirit.

most thais have respect, if someone dies, every man and his dog will turn up for the funeral, even if it means coming all the way from BKK.
all the guys in the soi are there strait away putting up the tents, running the electric, the women play their part, helping a hand cutting pork and preparing vegetables, catching up on the gossip, a real helping hand to those who have lost their loved ones, a togetherness feeling at a time of in need, whether your a farang or a thai.

nobody likes bad driving, especially someone encroaching on ones space, but how long have we been here to know what it's like, it's only been in the news so much lately because of technology ie: cams, cameras every where. some years ago road rage hit the UK like a fashion, tail gating, honking, flashing of lights, the birdie was the call, get out the way attitude. now in the Uk a minor traffic offence, a lenthy court case, a hefty fine, for something like having no back light on your bicycle  :o wow serious stuff.

if we stop and think for a moment what Thailand has to offer us, unlike back home, we should feel better already. that smile from the old lady when buying your noodles in the market, the wai you get at some stores, you can party all night. dink dink and dance all for a pittance. even guys old, fat, ugly or whatever, they can still get a floosie for a good time, all for a pittance, relive their youth for a second time, not sit in the corner of a bar in the UK looking into their beer thinking of their younger days.

We made the right choice coming here, but like most things that's great, there is drawbacks, here it's the driving. when ever i drive into town, i get my orders from the wife, keep your hands on the wheel, no rude gestures, don't toot your horn at anyone, some have guns, some take yaba, some have been drinking, i don't want a dead husband, then there's the pension to think of  ;D ha! ha!.

I think in being here for so long we tend to forget what it was like in our own country.

drive carefully guys stay safe. :cheers
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand - just wearing the uniform
« Reply #212 on: March 13, 2018, 04:09:10 PM »
To add insult to injury, making things worse - just wearing the uniform without “having the spirit of a police officer”.

Bangkok traffic officer arrested and suspended for alleged extortion nationmultimedia.com

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Baby Farts

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #213 on: March 13, 2018, 05:11:02 PM »
Hi BF. Long time no see. Hope you are OK. We've crossed swords before on driving matters and I'm sorry, but I just couldn't resist giving you my view on this  :punch

The video you posted in Reply 199 - it looks to me that you are already closing quite fast on the pick-up ahead in your lane, who is about to overtake the bus. Indeed it seems that you then accelerate to close the gap, no doubt having detected the cheeky Subaru coming on the inside  ;)

Not slowing at all for the hazard situation you see developing. Far from it, (it's personal with this Subaru blighter), you blaze through the turning lane and fortunately, the vehicle about to turn had conceded you space.

Cheeky Subaru. Aggressive BF ! For the safety of yourself and yours, I'd calm it down BF.
I commented before about your 13 accidents - that's a lot M8. Take some of the advice your other KF's have offered ? Adjust ?

The train horn is not a good idea apart from being illegal. In that video, you say you didn't have time for the train horn ? What ? No left hand wing mirror ? You were racing M8 ;)

I don't want to dollop you off but take care eh ? ATB



Hey Roger! Long time no see!  I was wondering where ya been. :) 

It's hard to tell in that video, but I can assure you I had to do that maneuver in a split second or I would have been history.  Fortunately, one of the things I've been gifted with is my reaction times.  I doubt most people would have been able to pull that off and had I not driven aggressively in that particular situation that guy would have creamed into the side of me.  As you can see, he was not about to yield at all. I could see what was about to happen eyeing the Subaru in my rear mirror as well and had to speed up in order to make it thru on the right side.  What you don't see in that video is how bloody fast the Subaru was coming up behind me.  I should have posted the rear camera view as well. I don't drive fast or reckless and I certainly don't race, especially against a Subaru Wr2 which is a race version of that model car. Pretty nice car too.  I open up my favorite app, "Calm Radio" and listen to some Reiki, Piano Solos, or SPA toons. lol.  No Joke.  Check the app out.

Thirteen accidents where none of them were my fault, most of them hit and runs by scooter boy.  Never a single accident in forty years in the States. The train horn is not illegal as per several of my police friends have told me.  It's sort of a gray area because it depends how and why you would use it.  In fact, there is a shop down the road from the Mall that is now selling REAL train horns!  I asked the owner about them and get this, he said some people have heard them on certain cars here in Korat and wanted to put them in their cars.  I wonder who that could be.  8) No joke!  These are the real deal. I honestly don't enjoy blowing that horn, but it some limited circumstances, I have to.  Every time I step into my vehicle I have to put my 100% undivided defensive driving skills into practice.  I'm used to it. 

On a side note.  My son is ranked #1 in all Thailand now for his age group in Tennis!  Well, for 2017.  I remember a while back when I spoke to you about lessons for him and such. Two-three years ago?  He's quite the player and took first place in the two final Grand Slam tournaments in Thailand last December. He had to move up now to the 10 year old group and also 12 year olds.  He's only 9.  But in only two months he's already #4.  Amazing player.  Here's a video I made of him a few days ago.  Hope it's cool with thaiga even though it has nothing to do with the topic.

Keep the peace, Roger and if you're ever interested in some doubles, let me know.  Cheers and thanks for the reply. great to see you again.

The Beauty of Tennis III
 
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Offline Roger

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Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #214 on: March 13, 2018, 05:59:37 PM »
BF. Thanks for your most Gentlemanly reply and it's good to see the young Man in action. I'll reply in more detail tomorrow. ATB
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #215 on: March 17, 2018, 10:20:10 AM »
Hi BF. I did reply to yours in detail but it didn't post. (Maybe I was not logged in when I posted ?).

I'll repeat it but wondered if it was stuck somewhere so I am waiting for return of Thaiga (before I do the work again).

No sign of Thaiga for a few days ? Hope all is well ? R
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #216 on: March 17, 2018, 01:16:27 PM »
Hi roger, nothing in the log about your missing post and nothing has been deleted.

No sign of Thaiga for a few days, i'm here, not gone anywhere, just disappointed in the replies, the thread has turned itself into the life of one man.

Most expats are getting on a bit in life and have come here to retire, most don't want to know about the mafia life and the talk of weapons. These people are also putting there family at risk if someone you upset on the roads happened to follow you home and find out where you live. We all know how some  hold a grudge. I posted, that there is plenty of room on the forum for your family snaps, start a new thread, but that has fallen on deaf ears.

so there you have it roger, shouldn't have to keep deleting posts, maybe the admin will tidy it up. until then, for you roger just one more post. Biker On Phone.

Biker On Phone... Wait For It
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Offline Roger

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Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #217 on: March 17, 2018, 01:27:13 PM »
Hi BF.

Re. the offer of a doubles match at tennis - NO WAY am I gonna take on your 9 year old after watching that clip! Thanks and I'll show Juerg the tennis coach. Well done to the Lad and Dad  :)
I don't play tennis any more - coming up to 71. But I still cycle and walk around the mountains a lot.

Re. the driving - I'll work through it again. Here we go !

1-2 seconds - all looks ok. 100 m to the Pick up and Bus tucked inside.
5 seconds - Subaru appears on your nearside. You must have seen it approaching in your mirrors at 3-4 seconds and at 4 seconds it's in your peripheral vision.
6 seconds - Subaru clearly moving into your lane. Still 80 meters to Pick up.
8 seconds - Subaru in your lane, you're in the TURNING lane - if the Subaru hadn't come along you were still going too fast to tuck in behind the Pick up. Why ?
10 seconds - it's all over - you're BLAZING down the outside in the TURNING lane having WON your battle .

Sorry M8 I've looked at this too much now. My last effort wot I lost  :-[ was much better.

But the conclusions are just the same. A gentle throttle back / touch on the brakes would have cured the hazard. Indeed, you seem to accelerate (though it's hard to tell).

I should disconnect those cameras M8. If you have an accident - they might prove you wrong.

I repeat : ''Not slowing at all for the hazard situation you see developing. Far from it, (it's personal with this Subaru blighter), you blaze through the turning lane and fortunately, the vehicle about to turn had conceded you space.''

You posted : ''Fortunately, one of the things I've been gifted with is my reaction times.  I doubt most people would have been able to pull that off and had I not driven aggressively in that particular situation that guy would have creamed into the side of me.''

MMmmmm - don't look like defensive driving to me or any reaction at all ! Just defiance and throttle. I'm just an ole' Codger as you know but maybe take the advice of NAB, TW, Thaiga and cool it. For your safety.

Sorry to push it but it's for you !  ATVB
 
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Offline nan

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #218 on: March 18, 2018, 11:56:03 AM »
DO NOT DELETE any posts,let the readers see the way it is and the way some farang are, anyway you might need them for future reference. notice how the subject changes when challenged. Bravo roger probably the best post you have made. Thaiga by not posting will bring great delight to the koratfart  haters. then there is the Thaiga haters eaten out with jealousy,watching everyday,their stomach churning reading the posts knowing they have a problem trying to string a few words together

some of you guys must really wake up, you are old men 70 + most and the land of smiles is not what it use to be.
the new generation will put you down with one kick.on the tv the other day an 82 yr old man,collecting a bit of rubbish to earn some money is still in hospital after being attacked by a guy that clipped his bike.

Attack On Elderly Man
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #219 on: March 18, 2018, 02:29:20 PM »
Well! thanks nan, Thaiga haters indeed :o OK no deletes the evidence stays. Now for the 82 yr old guy in the clip being attacked, who is to blame for the incident

Eighty two year old attacked in street was once successful company owner

Where ever the blame lies, there is no need for the violence, a 21 yr old man has been arrested, what will it be, pay the medical bills, small fine, couple of wais, all forgotten. do people have more faith in cash than in the legal system. I had to laugh in the clip after the first kick the guy attacking falls on his ass. Like most people there is a story to tell, the old guy who sleeps outside of 7-eleven with his rubbish cart does so by his own choice, he was once a successful company owner. Thai rath - thaivisa - and the samuitimes run the story  pic@ Thairath.co.th.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #220 on: March 19, 2018, 12:51:40 AM »
So a new start here for a clean thread, have your say by all means, insults we can live without. were a friendly lot really  :punch :hunter () LOL!

how many pussies can you get on one bike ;)

Man Rides Motorbike with Four Cats in Thailand
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Offline Roger

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Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #221 on: March 19, 2018, 05:32:09 AM »
The attack on the 82 year old Guy is just shocking - hard to see why the motorbike hit the cart at all?
All the other motorbikes passed by ok.

Four cats on the pillion - MMMmmmm

I've seen 4 young Ladies on a motorbike at Kanchanaburi - the driver was on the phone of course. And the other day, 3 ladies with 2 babies sandwiched in . . .

But this does not match 5 people and a goat that I once saw in Nigeria.  ;)  ATB
 
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Online Baby Farts

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #222 on: March 19, 2018, 09:58:10 PM »
Roger.  As I stated, you did not see the Subaru who was right on my tail BEFORE he moved to the other lane.  He didn't just appear on my side. He had been tailgating me for quite sometime ( I couldn't even see his head lights) and attempted his little overtake stunt (the part you see in the video) when he passed then cut in front of me. The distances you see in the video are deceiving and I can assure you I did what I had to do to avoid being hit by this reckless Thai driver.  A touch on the brakes and he would have slammed into me for sure.  The clip I posted is only a very SMALL portion of the incident, highlighting the reckless part where he pulls his little stunt. Trust me, if you could see the incident in its entirety you'd see the dangerous situation I faced with only seconds to respond.  This video makes distances look farther than they really are.  The nimrod was a lot closer.....WAY too close, which seems to be another problem most Thais have here when they drive, which is tailgating.   Another would be the total disregard for pedestrians, which in most modern countries, have the right of way over cars. Not here in Thailand. We can talk about that in another thread and I can share some experiences I had when I stopped to let a pedestrian cross the road.  Big mistake.  Don't ever ever do it, because I can assure you, the other Thai drivers will not stop and the pedestrian will nod nicely to you thanking you for stopping to let them go, only to find a speeding car coming down the side of you who could care less and will not stop. Guess what happens next.

Nan, you seem to make a lot of generalizations and assumptions about foreigners here on the forum.  For starters, not everyone here is over 70+.  This "new generation" you talk about is not new to the rest of the modern world.  It sounds like it might be new to you, though.  I come from a gun country, you know, America?  Act and drive like you do here, in America, and you won't be getting a kick, you'll get a bullet to the head....and that's if the police don't chase you down and beat you to a pulp first. Another thing. I'm not sure which foreigners you are referring to when you say they need to wake up.  I think you'll find that many foreigners are wide awake to what goes on around here having lived here for many years......and many Thais do not like that.   In fact, I think a lot Thais do not want foreigners to wake up, because farang roo mak, mai dee (the foreigner who knows too much is not good).  I've lived here going on eighteen years straight and I know good and well what goes on around here and how things work, but I'm not going to sugarcoat anything or pretend everything is sa-bai sa-bai when it isn't.... and when people talk about things they don't like here, it doesn't mean they hate Thais or look down on the country. I do agree with you on one thing, though.  Thailand, and especially Korat, is certainly not what it used to be! Personally, I like this new generation of Thais, because they are starting to think for themselves instead of acting like the old-school Thais... and they don't take crap from anyone either! Bravo in my book! 

Back to the topic and driving.  A portion of the things I post here with regards to driving and such are opinions for the most part that many Thais have shared with me.  To quote, verbatim from some of the Thais I have spoken to in regards to driving.  I quote:

Dee (Thai, Educated in the states. Engineer in Bangkok)-
"Thai people drive very bad because they are always in a hurry and don't think about anybody else. It's mostly because no education."

Oh (Scrub Nurse at a local hospital, married to a Japanese Business man. Has lived abroad and educated abroad)
"Thai people looking for the easy way for do things. Not safe, but they don't care so they do it anyway. Like going the wrong way on the road. Many are poor and  no education so they don't think."

Bum (Business man and former Colonel in the Air Force)
"Liu-Lai!"  <--- translated this means irresponsible.

Interesting trend I noticed is that lack of education seems to come up a lot which could suggest that what NotABuffalo posted earlier might hold some merit. Lack of education isn't necessarily a put down either.  It simply means lack of knowledge and doesn't know. I can tell you that when my wife was first learning how to drive, I sent her to a driving school.  They told her, "we'll teach you how to pass the test."  Not "we'll teach you how to drive."  Most of the course took place in a class room with one of those car simulator things that looks like someone made in their garage. What I find amusing is how she too, now shares the same challenges I have to face on the roads here on a daily basis.  She understands now and I have heard her lose her cool on more than one occasion and blurt out something like, "fkcing idiot"  :cussing when a fellow Thai endangers her life on the road like cutting dangerously in front of her. I find it amusing at times because I say to her, "now you understand why I have a train horn?"  :salute


 
 

Offline nan

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #223 on: March 20, 2018, 12:35:27 AM »
we all know what the roads are like even the thai people, everyone gets a driving licence, you just keep going back if you fail, till they get fed up with you, then there is your licence. don't take too much to heart, the reason i mentioned age, you say 40 yrs accident free back home, you have been here 18 yrs that makes 58, if you started driving at the age of 14. 40+18+14 =72.

you like this new generation of Thais, because they are starting to think for themselves, kicking an 82 yr old man, putting him in hospital, thought you had a dislike for scooter boy. you post I've lived here going on eighteen years straight and I know good and well what goes on around here and how things work, then you post (the foreigner who knows too much is not good)  sorry mate your words not mine.

don't take offence just sticking up for myself, nice vid you must be proud of him. i hope one day he will be famous.
my daughter has just passed as in pharmacy, i'm still in tears with the happiness, take care, NAN
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #224 on: March 20, 2018, 01:38:05 PM »
Hi BF. Thanks for your reply. If the Subaru was tailgating you before undertaking then you had even longer to find a way to opt out of the scrap. Sorry but the camera's show what was going on accurately enough. Please reflect on it for the safety of you and yours - but thanks for hearing me out politely and that does you credit. I hope my comments didn't come over as patronising - you did put it up for discussion. ATB

 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #225 on: March 20, 2018, 02:01:16 PM »
I come from a gun country, you know, America?  Act and drive like you do here, in America, and you won't be getting a kick, you'll get a bullet to the head....and that's if the police don't chase you down and beat you to a pulp first.
so Thailand is quite mild to what your used to, i think i prefer it here, must be awful to live like that. after 18 years you must have got use to it here, i tolerate the driving here just like the rest of us do. before i get in the car to drive anywhere i condition myself, let people pass if they want to get in front, give way to people is not giving in, but might prevent that one accident that could be my last.  :salute

buffy you posted. I enjoy my days out on the motorcycle around Korat with my Buddies.   ;)
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand - overheated farang
« Reply #226 on: March 21, 2018, 11:58:23 AM »
Thai motorcyclist, tourist fight over use of pavement  nationmultimedia.com

Farrang fistycuffs


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #227 on: March 26, 2018, 01:27:45 PM »

Eighty two year old attacked in street was once successful company owner

the old guy who sleeps outside of 7-eleven with his rubbish cart does so by his own choice, he was once a successful company owner.




pic@ khaosodenglish.com

The thai people certainly have a big heart when it come to helping people, Netizens on Monday had raised almost 1 million baht for an 82-year-old garbage picker recovering in hospital after being beaten senseless. “Since he left the hospital he’s only been sleeping. He can’t help himself at all. He can only answer with a word or two or complains about his pains,” Juroon’s daughter Wanida Maneepan, 38, told reporters. “He can’t eat his own food; I have to feed him. I’m so scared he will become a paralytic.”  full article khaosodenglish.com
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Offline thaiga

Motorcyclist now charged with killing old scavenger

A charge of physical assault causing death is being brought against a young motorcyclist seen on video attacking an elderly scavenger in Bangkok, after the old man died in hospital on Thursday night.

Narathorn Sodtiyang, 21, had earlier been charged with assault causing injury.

Huai Khwang police chief Kamphon Rattanapratheep said Mr Narathon would now face the harsher charge of assault causing death after Charoon Maneepan, 82, was pronounced dead at Rajavithi Hospital on Thursday at 10.50pm.

The charge was brought against him under Section 290 of the Criminal Code.

Pol Col Kamphon said Mr Narathorn would be summonsed to acknowledge the charge.

On March 14, Mr Narathorn surrendered to Huai Khwang police and admitted assaulting Charoon in a fit of anger.

He claimed the elderly man knocked down his motorcycle with his push-cart tricycle in narrow Soi Chan Muang 2 in Din Daeng area on the evening of March 13 and drove off without offering to assist him.

Mr Narathorn denied reports on social media he was using a mobile phone while riding his bike at the time of the accident, and not paying attention.

He was held in police custody on assault charges.

Charoon was hit with a high, swinging leg kick and then knocked off his tricycle cart to the ground. He was left bedridden and suffered from pressure sores. He was treated at Rajavithi hospital, but his family later took him home.

On Thursday they took him back to the hospital, suffering from a high fever.

His daughter Nida Maneepan said hospital staff gave Charoon CPR for about 30 minutes after he went into cardiogenic shock, but were unable to resuscitate him.

Doctors said he had a blood infection, she said.

bangkokpost.com

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand - Who's to blame
« Reply #229 on: April 07, 2018, 11:56:18 AM »
Who's to blame

เถียงกันไม่จบจยย ล้มชนกระบะ นักกฎหมายชี้ประมาทร่วม
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Online Baby Farts

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #230 on: April 07, 2018, 02:12:09 PM »
If it's a farang driving the truck then the farang of course.

Who's to blame here?  Dude actually brushed so close to my vehicle, you could see where his jacket rubbed off the dirt.  No damage to my vehicle, though.

Motorcycle Collision Korat Thailand (Scooter boy bites the dust).
 

Offline nan

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #231 on: April 07, 2018, 02:39:45 PM »
seen it before,already been posted
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #232 on: April 08, 2018, 11:52:36 AM »
Who's to blame here?

If it's a farang driving the truck then the farang of course.

How honest of you ;)

seen it before,already been posted

yes nan posted on April 24, 2017 in half-as-serious-and-less  :uhm
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline nan

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #233 on: April 18, 2018, 03:31:22 PM »
posted in half as serious,sorry i missed the joke.
if the cameraman was not parked there then both vehicles involved in the accident might of had a better view of the road
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Online Baby Farts

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #234 on: April 19, 2018, 12:16:33 PM »
posted in half as serious,sorry i missed the joke.
if the cameraman was not parked there then both vehicles involved in the accident might of had a better view of the road

Your typical Thai like response, shunning responsibility. IF IF IF.  Never mind the fact that the cyclist is speeding recklessly, no helmet.  I spoke with the lady in the car afterwards and provided a copy of the video which was also presented to her insurance company.  Obstruction of view was not the cause of this accident and she saw the motorcyclist clearly coming out of control LONG before the impact, weaving far to the left, then into her car, because she told me that and told the insurance company that. Look WHERE the point of impact took place.  LOOK at the rear view camera and the swerving LONG before the impact AND the guy on the motorcycle parked behind me who ALSO saw what's coming and tried to move out of the way...but you're not interested in the truth. You're only interested in trying to find a way to attack me while hiding behind your keyboard...and frankly, I've just about had enough of your B.S.

 

Online Baby Farts

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #235 on: April 19, 2018, 12:50:23 PM »
so Thailand is quite mild to what your used to, i think i prefer it here, must be awful to live like that. after 18 years you must have got use to it here, i tolerate the driving here just like the rest of us do. before i get in the car to drive anywhere i condition myself, let people pass if they want to get in front, give way to people is not giving in, but might prevent that one accident that could be my last.  :salute

buffy you posted. I enjoy my days out on the motorcycle around Korat with my Buddies.   ;)

I'm used to many things here, thaiga, but it doesn't mean I have to tolerate them...and I don't when it comes to the way people drive here. See how much you "tolerate" the driving when a reckless, irresponsible, impatient, Thai smashes into you and kills one of your loved ones.  See how much you "tolerate" having to get your car repaired on your own, because if you put in a claim with the insurance company, they will raise your premium for the next year.  See how much you "tolerate" when the Thai at fault tries to blame you when you were not at fault.  See how much you "tolerate" when the Thai try to get you to lie and admit the accident was your fault, because they don't insurance, but you do so that YOUR insurance company pays for his damaged vehicle too, even though the accident was not your fault.  Can you see what I'm getting at here?  If these sorts of things happened occasionally it wouldn't be a problem, but they don't.  It's a constant ongoing thing which I know won't change nor have I ever had the notion to expect or try to change their behavior.  Nevertheless, I will deal with it the way I see appropriate in order to save life and save me money. 

No offense to your comments.  I just don't think you fully understand the scope of everything in its entirety. I "used" to take the passive attitude towards many things here in the past, but not anymore...and I'll tell you why.  Many Thais see that as a weakness and take advantage of you when they see you act like that.  They know the "greng jai and mai pen rai" attitude are rampant here, and it gives them opportunity to do what they want because they know that it would be too greng jai for you to point out their mistake and say something.  This is why when you honk your horn at them, even when they are clearly in the wrong, they loose their mind.  It's because you're effectively pointing out their mistake in front of the other motorists which leads to a loss of face....not to mention that it also infuriates them because you're not exhibiting the "greng jai, mai pen rai" attitude that they expect you to follow.  It's like, "How dare you point out my mistake!"

Please don't take my reply here in the wrong way.  I do pretty much the same things you do before I step into my car. I will also add that I know many people, including many Thais, mostly my friends in Thai law enforcement, who also do not tolerate the way folks drive here, and that goes for some foreigners too.  I've got plenty videos of reckless foreigners driving like idiots too, right here in Korat.  I see them all the time when I take my children to school.

I actually know two foreigners here who refuse to drive any vehicles in Thailand.  They will only travel by song teaw or bus, or in dire circumstances, a tuk tuk.

*Hey, I just thought of something.  Maybe, I should do what many of the rich Thais do and just hire a driver.  What do you think?  I know the perfect vehicle too.  Always wanted one of these.  Only trouble is I might end up wanting to drive it more than the driver.  ;D  :cheers

https://www.jeep.com.au/grand-cherokee-srt.html
 

Offline nan

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #236 on: April 19, 2018, 01:20:31 PM »
You're only interested in trying to find a way to attack me while hiding behind your keyboard...and frankly, I've just about had enough of your B.S.
you put a post up for discussion and you want the reply to be how you would like it. the guy was injured in the video and you put the post in half as serious. you never answered that, why.

POINT OUT where my attacking is /you posted the video twice,if my posts are insulting ask the admin to delete my account,i'm sure i'm bothered

have a nice day
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #237 on: April 19, 2018, 02:55:08 PM »

I actually know two foreigners here who refuse to drive any vehicles in Thailand.  They will only travel by song teaw or bus, or in dire circumstances, a tuk tuk.

Funny you should mention that

I was thinking the same, my licence expires in 2 yrs. I really hate having to drive into town, there are so many cars on the road as well, mrs.t yelling in my ear, mind that motorbike, you cannot take your eyes of the road for 1 second. i don't go any distance only chumpuon to korat for 90 day report, might not renew, there is always a car/driver on hand here, for a few hundred bht or mrs. has a licence, then i do start yelling when they cut her up on the road :cussing

PS: Don't get wound up it's only a forum, more important things in life ;D    :cheers
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online KiwiCanadian

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #238 on: April 19, 2018, 05:38:53 PM »
BF you might want to view this clip before you buy that Jeep Grand Cherokee.

FCA have a very bad track record of customer service et all.
I know first hand I have a 2008 Jeep grand cherokee Overland Diesel here in Canada. the service that I get from the stealer, yes that's what we call them here is atrocious, this is my first and last Jeep, its a 4 letter word any way.

The engine is the Mercedes Benz 3L v6 diesel which is fairly good but........
I could write a whole column on what else is wrong with my Jeep.
 
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OxICdmnvXiI
 

Online Baby Farts

Re: Driving in thailand
« Reply #239 on: April 19, 2018, 08:10:33 PM »
Eeek!  Thanks for the link! I just found out the import tax on the 6.4 litre engine is enormous.  Forget that.  I had a jeep Cherokee as a second vehicle back in the states, the V-6 model.  It was okay, but not outstanding.  This new jeep with the huge powerful engine is what got me excited, but after seeing that video and checking other resources, I think I'm going to pass on it. I've always wanted that new Ford Everest 3.2 titanium.  I have a feeling there's going to be another face lift and body change to the Fords soon, perhaps 2019. 
 

 



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