Author Topic: Thai Big Brother  (Read 4267 times)

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Offline Johnnie F.

Thai Big Brother
« on: April 19, 2016, 08:54:31 AM »
BANGKOK — Foreign nationals residing in Thailand are being asked to disclose personal information to the government, including their bank details and where they hang out online and offline.

Internal documents obtained earlier this month by Khaosod English showed the Immigration Bureau would ask foreigners for personal details about places they frequent in the virtual and real worlds, additional information to be filed before they can extend their visas or complete the routine 90-day reports required to reside legally in the kingdom.

In recent days, a number of people have reported on Twitter and online forums frequented by expats that they have received the new forms at the Immigration Division 1 office and One-Stop Service Center at Chamchuri Square. Both are in Bangkok.

Apart from the basic information, the form requires details about what social media they use, details of vehicles they use including license plate numbers, and “places or premises visited often by the foreigner … such as club, restaurant, shop, hospital and other places.” The form also asks for their bank account numbers.

Chatchawan Wachirapaneekhun, deputy commissioner of the Immigration Bureau’s crime suppression unit, said providing the information was not mandatory.

“We won’t force them to fill it out,” he said. “We won’t bother with their social media – if they aren't doing anything wrong.”

Maj. Gen. Chatchawan, who wrote the new form, said he personally urged immigration offices nationwide to collect the information on March 22. It is purportedly for recording information of all foreigners entering and living in the kingdom. It indicates the information will be used to record of residence in the country according to articles 37 and 38 of the 1979 Immigration Act.

Chatchawan said in the past, immigration lacked sufficient information about foreign nationals living in Thailand when problems arose. He said the new information was being sought to help track down foreigners when problems arose.

He said that the information would soon be integrated under the same linked information system. Some of the information such as bank account details, he said were already required for extended stays.

“We are considering national security,” he said. “Considering entering the ASEAN community and the increasing terrorism problem, some people escape after committing a crime, and we cannot track them down.”

Khaosodenglish





Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline takeitor

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2016, 01:38:17 PM »
Whilst there is a huge part of me that is scared sh*tless about this information being held by the government, there is also a part of me that realises that most of this info is already held somewhere accessible anyway.  As I have mentioned before, I am a regular objector to the vice of social media generally and if you have an open Facebook or Twitter account your information is pretty much public property anyway.  However I would draw the line at any bank account outside Thailand (my Thai bank already have my passport details and I'm pretty sure they've already had to give my details to a government department somewhere).

All this is even more ridiculous if it is not going to be mandatory.  Whilst I'm glad it is not mandatory, if you don't have to fill in the data, what benefit to national security could it possibly be?...and if the data is not double-checked, any half sensible  criminal would simply lie anyway.

Registering contact details for next of kin, or a local contact, would make thing easier on the authorities in the event of an accident or death but, beyond that, it all just adds to the ever-growing mountain of useless information that tries to appear to be combating crime but is, in fact, merely suppressing those who are trying to do the right thing.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2016, 05:35:30 PM »
beyond that, it all just adds to the ever-growing mountain of useless information that tries to appear to be combating crime but is, in fact, merely suppressing those who are trying to do the right thing.

I'll go along with that + if your details get in the wrong hands it could benefit the bad guys  :-[

We were doing a demo
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Confusion Over Controversial New Immigration Form
« Reply #3 on: April 20, 2016, 11:52:53 AM »
A bit more info from khaosodenglish.com

Sebastien edged up to the counter and handed the form to the immigration officer. A few breaths later, it was accepted despite a lot of unanswered questions.

In recent days alarm has been raised over a new immigration form asking foreigners to provide the government with their bank details and where they hang out online and offline.

An immigration officer working at the building where the document is currently in circulation said Tuesday it is not mandatory to answer every question.

“We definitely need them to fill in as much information as they can,” said the Immigration Bureau’s Phurita Ruangpankaew at the One-Stop Service Center for Visa and Work Permit located inside Chamchuri Square Building. “But if they don’t want to fill in a space, then [they can] put a dash in the blank space.”

Sebastien, a French national who has been living in the kingdom for 10 years, said this was the first time that he was asked to provide this kind of personal information.

“It’s useless,”said the French national. “Why do they need to know my social media account, my bank account or my parent's names?”

He didn't complete the form.

“I didn’t fill anything and here it is,” he said, showing the permission for an extended stay he had just been granted.

But there seem to be mixed messages regarding the controversial form which went into effect April 4.

An agent working for a company who helps process work permit applications for foreigners said he has instructed more than 10 of his clients to fill in every detail on the form.

“They all came here to work. I do think it is weird to ask about information such as their parents’ names,” Sedtawut Kijraksa said. “It might be an effect from the fear of terrorism.”

Sedtawut said he never asked the officers whether it was necessary for his clients to answer all questions.

Steve Herman, Voice of America’s Southeast Asia bureau chief, said a member of his staff was told by an officer at the same service center Tuesday morning that 90-day reports would not be processed until the new form was completed and filed.

Foreign nationals residing in Thailand on valid work permits must update the Immigration Bureau on their status every three months.

Comments online have been unsparing, ranging from the befuddled to the bemused.

Facebook user Andreas Holmer, commenting yesterday on a Khaosod English article, claimed that he left most questions on the new form unanswered and encountered no problems at immigration last week.

"I did hear however that when this form was introduced a few weeks back, the officers would actually refuse to see you unless you completed the form," Holmer wrote. "They soon had to ease up on those restrictions.”

A human resource officer from a company called Raja Ochano, who would only identify herself as Hong, said she discovered the new form today. She said she needed to return to her office to discuss with a foreign staff member there how comfortable he is with filling it out.

“I asked the officer,” she said. “But you know, they don’t really explain much.”

While the form was a concern for some expats, a Bangladeshi man who has been working in Thailand for two years said he has no problem with it.

“It helps to get more information,” Muhbul Hasan said. “It will benefit both us and the government.”

Chatchawan Wachirapaneekhun, the Immigration Bureau deputy commissioner who designed the form said Monday that it would help solve problems, such as the difficulty in tracking down foreigners who commit a crime. He insisted providing the information was not mandatory.

“We want to collect as much information as we can. And it actually increases the work for the Immigration Bureau,” police Maj. Gen. Chatchawan said. “But it will benefit the country.”
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #4 on: April 21, 2016, 10:33:42 AM »
Sebastian has permanent residency....  He is a good guy and I have used his law firm several times, and the service has ALWAYS been perfect. 

This whole nonsense asking foreigners to provide more and more personal info is fcked up.  "We need pictures of you inside your house."  WTF is that about? And asking foreigners to HAND DRAW MAPS???   My house is PAID entirely...not financed and neither are the 3 cars I own.  I spent a shitload of baht to put in an extensive CCTV to protect myself from....THAIS not foreigners 

Maybe the Gov needs to think about who is the real threat in Thailand....
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #5 on: April 21, 2016, 11:24:16 AM »
Maybe the Gov needs to think about who is the real threat in Thailand....


Foreigner Attacked Outside Pattaya Convenience Store

credit@stickboynetwork

story here .stickboybangkok.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: 'Intrusive' form irks travellers, expats
« Reply #6 on: April 22, 2016, 12:30:06 PM »
'Intrusive' form irks travellers, expats

The Immigration Bureau has defended its move to ask foreign visitors and expatriates to fill out an elaborate form, including personal and banking details, as they seek visas and meet reporting requirements.

But the bureau said most of the questions on the form -- such as which restaurants and clubs people frequent and which social media they used -- were not mandatory.

Pol Maj Gen Chatchawan Wachirapaneekhun, deputy chief of the bureau, who initiated the idea, said the information, plus an additional picture to be affixed to the form, would be useful for security measures.

The bureau will use the information to ensure the safety of tourists or those who work in Thailand, he said, assuring the details will remain confidential.

The bureau will analyse the data to help their efforts to prevent crimes, adding anyone who feels uncomfortable will not be forced to fill in the detalls.

A source at the bureau said the move is being implemented on a trial basis and was initiated by Pol Maj Gen Chatchawan and approved by Pol Lt Gen Nathathorn Prousoontorn, chief of the bureau. The bureau has since been flooded with complaints by foreigners worried about their safety and privacy, the source said.

The form titled Record of Foreigner Information entered circulation earlier this month. It asks for people's name, age and passport details. But it adds new sections to pre-existing forms, such as listing "all social media used by foreigner" and the names of places the applicant frequents, specifying clubs, restaurants, shops, hospitals and other places.

It also asks for bank account numbers, and information on any vehicle and licence plates of cars or motorcycles the applicant uses.

"I was shocked when I saw the contents of the three-page form I was asked to complete while applying for a re-entry permit at the One-Stop Service Centre at Chamchuri Square," said Chris Wotton, a 27-year-old writer, who has been living in Bangkok since 2012.

"One part of the form was particularly ridiculous -- asking for 'places frequented'. This is just crazy. Should I put down every local stir-fry restaurant, som tum stall, bar and 7-Eleven convenience store I visit? The form asks for very personal information."

He said recent online data leaks from overseas hackers have already shown immigration authorities do not appear able to safeguard data they already have.

Tan Nguyen, 38, a Vietnamese correspondent from Thanh Nien newspaper who has been working in Bangkok since September 2014, said he is not willing to give any personal details.

"If they [the Immigration Bureau] force me to fill out a form, I would lie about the information they need," Tan said.

A 33-year-old Canadian national, who has been working in Thailand for nearly 10 years, but asked not to be named, said he felt uncomfortable providing his private information to Thai authorities.

"I have no faith in any government's ability to protect my private information," he said.

Bangkokpost
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #7 on: April 23, 2016, 09:21:14 AM »
Foreigner Attacked Outside Pattaya Convenience Store
credit@stickboynetwork

story here .stickboybangkok.com


And this is exactly what I'm talking about.  Still unsure what provoked these Thais to practice their Muay Thai skills on this foreigner.  Thais don't just give a good beating to a foreigner for no reason.  This guy must have done something to piss them off.  Just my thoughts.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #8 on: April 23, 2016, 09:43:13 AM »
Thaiga....don't forget....Everything is to "Benefit the country."  Yeah right. How?  These people crack me up.

How about take away their cars, motorcycles, and any moving vehicle.  That would benefit the country.  Maybe, they would go down on the list from #2 in the world of having deaths from road accidents.

I have another idea.  How about shoot the dicks of all the dead beat fathers who can't even take care of their family or pay their bills.  I'm a foreigner, but I can pay my bills in a third world country.

Ok, Thaiga... I get it now.  Marry a foreigner who you perceive to be rich and you just won the lottery.  :lol :lol :lol

True.... i sent a text to my wife just now telling her to change her nickname to, "Lucky."

Here was her response....


 
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Offline thaiga

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #9 on: April 23, 2016, 12:32:20 PM »
And this is exactly what I'm talking about.  Still unsure what provoked these Thais to practice their Muay Thai skills on this foreigner.  Thais don't just give a good beating to a foreigner for no reason.  This guy must have done something to piss them off.  Just my thoughts.
You could be right, they say they was provoked, They were all under 15 years of age reports pattayaone.net

Acting on her information Pattaya police were able to arrest a gang of four teenagers, all under the age of 15, around the convenience stores location in Kao Talo. The youngsters claimed that the foreign man had punched one of them and they had acted to revenge their brother.

The youths accepted that two of them had acted in an inappropriate manner however claimed that they had not been drinking any alcohol at all on the night the assault took place and only reacted in anger to the foreigner’s initial painful attack.

Pattaya police took all four members of the group to Pattaya Police Station to question further and await their parents’ attendance.

Here's another When the German woke up he found his pockets had been rifled and 4,000 baht stolen
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline nan

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #10 on: April 23, 2016, 05:13:52 PM »
When the German woke up he found his pockets had been rifled and 4,000 baht stolen

don't mess with cocks in frocks with rocks
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 
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Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #11 on: April 23, 2016, 06:52:54 PM »
You could be right, they say they was provoked, They were all under 15 years of age reports pattayaone.net

Acting on her information Pattaya police were able to arrest a gang of four teenagers, all under the age of 15, around the convenience stores location in Kao Talo. The youngsters claimed that the foreign man had punched one of them and they had acted to revenge their brother.

The youths accepted that two of them had acted in an inappropriate manner however claimed that they had not been drinking any alcohol at all on the night the assault took place and only reacted in anger to the foreigner’s initial painful attack.

Pattaya police took all four members of the group to Pattaya Police Station to question further and await their parents’ attendance.

Here's another When the German woke up he found his pockets had been rifled and 4,000 baht stolen


They had not been drinking alcohol, but did they ingest yaba?
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #12 on: April 23, 2016, 07:03:55 PM »
thaiga...let me ad one more thing about that pic of my wife giving me the finger.  Those are Chinese pubes on her hand.  That's what you get get when you marry a Chinese Thai.......and if if you ever have any thoughts about "muff diving" with a Chinese girl.....   Don't, you'll suffocate.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #13 on: April 24, 2016, 12:27:34 AM »
They have arrested the ugly freaks in the rock throwing contest, wonder what the fine will be 200 bht. the 2 ladyboys had confessed to the crime after being arrested, therefore there will be a trial.

Pattaya police expressed concern regarding the problem of ladyboy’s sexual harassment and robbery and said, despite the 1,000 baht fine from law enforcement, they are still causing problems.



pattayaone.net
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #14 on: April 24, 2016, 07:55:50 AM »
thaiga....check out the lingo on the fag's shirt. "You are blowing?" ....and the other one with the Hello Kitty shirt.  Do Thais even know what that means?  It's like when you see a car with a playboy sticker on it.  They have no clue......What if farangs started driving around with stickers on their cars proclaiming to be playboys in the Thai language.

We live in a strange country.
 
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Offline nan

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #15 on: April 24, 2016, 11:36:01 AM »
the pointing finger cannot get ellection
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 
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Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #16 on: April 24, 2016, 05:24:46 PM »
the pointing finger cannot get ellection

Nan...and check out the bandages on the guy's face.
 
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Offline nan

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #17 on: April 24, 2016, 08:46:33 PM »
sorry / i ment errection / stiffy
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #18 on: April 25, 2016, 09:08:40 PM »
I know.....this shti is like watching a movie where the actors are being directed what to do.  "Put your finger here."

We need to show how this will benefit the country.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #19 on: April 26, 2016, 12:04:06 PM »
"SHOWTIME "  in the land of smiles

In Thailand the police have an exclusive on the right to stage the drama of a criminal reenactment. A number of times a year it is show time in the Land of Smiles.

The police re-enactment of crimes has been refined over many years in Thailand until it has reached the level of an anticipated theatrical event. The reconstructions of actual crimes might be thought to be closer to carnival or street theatre than Shakespearian tightly scripted plays. The police having caught the criminal arrange for him or her (most of the time it’s him) to appear in front of the media and show how the suspect committed the crime. The police are casted in the role of heroes, the villain (sometimes there are more than one) is the real-life suspect and everyone plays their role before news reporters and TV cameras.

Reenactments can carry a light note, a hint of comedy with a suspect who has the media spotlight.
That certainly proved to be the case with ...............

full article cgmoore.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Thai Big Brother
« Reply #20 on: June 30, 2016, 12:41:57 PM »
Not only in thailand

US border authority seeks travellers' social media details

Travellers seeking visa waiver entry to the US may soon be asked to list their social media profiles - if a Department of Homeland Security (DHS) proposal is enacted.

bbc.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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