Author Topic: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays  (Read 305084 times)

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sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #150 on: September 27, 2012, 12:18:56 PM »
I don't think that the styling is different enough from other modern sports cars for it to stand out as a potential cult favourite. It'll be a very nice car, though, I'm sure.

Well done TATA!
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #151 on: September 28, 2012, 07:34:12 PM »
                                         
                             





We had the comics delivered from the newsagents with the newspapers.I remember the beano and dandy and
also the topper,beezer,and school friend.All the old comics we would cut out the pictures and paste them
in our scrapbook,mixing flour and water together to make a paste to use as glue.

some comics had a free gift with them i remember the beezer giving away Whizz Bang,when you flicked it
open it made a loud bang. Colonel Blink the short sighted gink ha!ha! ther was biffo the bear,desperate
dan,ginger,the numskulls,baby crocket and lots more.

The Beezer with the free gift, a Whizz Bang is worth around 200 pound in mint condition.

                                                   

How to make a paper banger


The annuals were more of a christmas present thing but come in handy for other uses like 'book n skate'
put the annual on the skate sit on it and down the hill you went,great fun.





                                                   
                                                 
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #152 on: September 29, 2012, 03:17:32 AM »
The Golden Age of British Pop:-

Pete Townshend
Garry Glitter

And now James Savile:- http://order-order.com/2012/09/28/jimmy-savile-sex-abuse-exposed-bbc-cover-up-allegations-mounting/

We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #153 on: September 29, 2012, 08:01:59 AM »
Some people have had their suspicions about this guy for a long time.

When Jonathan King was convicted of child abuse, there were rumours that another well known DJ had been at it but he would not be exposed.(http://www.guardian.co.uk/uk/2001/nov/21/childprotection.society). Once Saville died, it seems that whatever protection he was enjoying ended and stories of his abusive ways were immediately published. His name is linked with those of several other perverts from entertainment, politics and the criminal underworld.

http://aangirfan.blogspot.com/2012/02/bbcs-jimmy-savile-and-child-abuse-cover.html

Organised paedophile rings such as this can have existed and their members escaped justice only because they were protected.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #154 on: September 29, 2012, 08:45:32 AM »
Saf, Lots of good stuff on the aangirfan site.  Some interesting names:-  Lord Boothby, Ted Heath, the ubiquitous Krays and Tom Driberg MP.  I once read an interesting story about Tom Driberg.  All his friends knew he was a raving homosexualist so they were amazed to hear that he was about to be married.  He took his new bride off to a West End restaurant for a celebratory meal.  In the restaurant Tom fell instantly in love with one of the waiters.  Tom followed him out into the kitchen and gave him a good rodgering.  His poor bride was left wondering if she had made the right decision.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #155 on: September 29, 2012, 09:17:06 AM »
There was talk some years ago about another ring in Manchester that included a comedian or two. Kids would be brought to a room where the perverts were waiting for them.

Homosexuality is legal. Child abuse, on the other hand, is illegal and very damaging to the victims. Rather too many of the perpetrators seem to be protected with only the occasional loner or one caught out publicly being thrown to the wolves to keep the public happy.

Here's some brief information from the NSPCC:

http://www.nspcc.org.uk/news-and-views/media-centre/key-information-for-journalists/facts-and-figures/Facts-and-figures_wda73664.html
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #156 on: September 29, 2012, 12:34:06 PM »
The Golden Age of British Pop:-



And now James Savile:- http://order-order.com/2012/09/28/jimmy-savile-sex-abuse-exposed-bbc-cover-up-allegations-mounting/
If it is true,shame it never come to light before he died so he could be punished.

                                        how's about that then"

       

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #157 on: September 29, 2012, 12:47:25 PM »
Perhaps someone will add a suitable inscription to the memorial which, I see, carried a crucifix, not a cross.

It did come to light before his death in the sense that there were some unsubstantiated stories being passed around. He, like so any others, was protected.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #158 on: September 29, 2012, 01:28:52 PM »
Yes , the inscription at top right needs changing to "Pederast".  For sure these guys watched their own backs.  The story of the Jersey police chief is just horrendous.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #159 on: September 29, 2012, 01:44:15 PM »
Then there's the fat bachelor who suddenly left politics:

http://rochdaleraw.blogspot.com/2009/05/cyril-smith-sex-abuse-allegations.html
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #160 on: September 29, 2012, 11:17:02 PM »
                                                       



do you remember the interlude they used to put on tv between programmes to keep you amused there was
The Potter's Wheel, The Spinning Wheel, The White Kitten, Angel fish, Horses ploughing a field,
and of course the classic "London to Brighton in 4 Minutes" enough time to make the tea err

                                       

London to Brighton in 4 minutes BBC interlude


                 

also i remember the testcards with the music in the background, the most famous and frequently used
being `Normal Service Will Be Resumed As Soon As Possible'.you would sit and wait till they found
the problem. can you imagine the uproar if that happened now.ha!ha!

1953 saw the Coronation of H.M. Queen Elizabeth on BBC.which was good for people in the north as it
was a long way to travel. the BBC brought forward its plans for opening the Pontop Pike transmitter
so they could view it on tv. When a car or motorbike went passed the house the picture would go all
fuzzy so they had to fit them with surppressers to stop Interference Suppression.

                                             

BBC Television Interference Suppression Demonstration Film




                                                 
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #161 on: September 30, 2012, 06:36:20 AM »
Is that MacDonald Hobley I see in one of the pics?
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #162 on: September 30, 2012, 12:32:23 PM »
thats right and the other sylvia peters.

BBC: Sylvia Peters, Peter Haigh, MacDonald Hobley, Alex Macintosh, Mary Malcolm, Robert Dougall  and Valerie Pitts.

McDonald Hobley (known as "Mac") he was the Senior Television Announcer
In those days every announcement was scripted and had to be memorised.They were written by the Presentation Department,very rarely was ad-libbing permitted
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #163 on: September 30, 2012, 09:34:50 PM »
                                                                 



                                             

Do you remember any of the girly magazines from years ago,there was loads of them.
parade - titbits - Reveille - men only.they claim to have sold well,yet i never see anybody buy one

on the bus or train guys would slip the pin up magazine inside the newspaper so people would think
they was reading the newspaper not ogling the sexy picies ha! ha!
they was always on the top shelf in the newsagents,but if you went to the mens barbers they had plenty

                                                   

teen magazines were populal with the girls which contained gossip, news, fashion tips, interviews some
would give away free stickers and posters.vogue was for more older women.

readers digest was an all time favourite and was produced for more than 47 years (1950-1997)
until being renamed as "Reader's Digest Select Editions" in the uk and usa.
you can still buy back issues at http://backissues.com

we had a set of Britannica Encyclopedia's brought off the tallyman at the door,on the weekly of course
they were brilliant loads of info in them,covered just about everything,



                                                 

                                                   

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #164 on: October 01, 2012, 07:56:42 AM »
Don't forget H&E. Here's one of the more tame covers:

 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #165 on: October 01, 2012, 01:44:29 PM »
that looks like 3 shillings on the cover,wow a lot of money for 1967. :cheers
looks like Coronation Street - Elsie Tanner (Pat Phoenix)

Coronation Street - Elsie Tanner (Pat Phoenix)


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #166 on: October 01, 2012, 09:50:56 PM »
Some more magazine covers:-

We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #167 on: October 02, 2012, 01:19:40 AM »
Private eye  i forgot that

nice one get your writs (.) (.)  out darling ♥  :lol
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #168 on: October 02, 2012, 06:44:09 AM »
Hi Thaiga,  I tried to get one of the earlier issues of Private Eye but they were all behind paywalls.  Maybe you could have more success?
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #169 on: October 02, 2012, 03:32:44 PM »
                     The first issue of the magazine appeared on October 25, 1961.

some of its most famous contributors: the late Peter Cook and comedian John Bird, alongside new material
from Barry Humphries, John Sessions and Harry Enfield.

The magazine cost 6d (two-and-a-half pence) and 300 copies were printed and distributed in coffee shops
around central London.its founders included comedians Peter Cook, Willie Rushton and Richard Ingrams.

Ian Hislop, team captain on the satirical TV show Have I Got News For You, took over as editor of the magazine in 1986.
Private Eye was involved in one of the largest libel payouts in British legal history when Sonia Sutcliffe, wife of the
Yorkshire Ripper, was awarded 600,000.pounds It was later reduced by consent to 60,000.pounds

To buy old issues now are including delivery: 30.00 pound

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #170 on: October 02, 2012, 05:24:07 PM »
Thanks thaiga, I knew you could do it.  Just one Private Eye story:-

There are many interesting stories about Private Eye.  One concerns the regular fortnightly lunches that the Editorial Team used to hold in a room above the Coach & Horses pub in Soho.  For each lunch a Prominent Person would be invited and plied with drink in the hope that some insider gossip could be prised out of them in time for inclusion in the next edition of the Eye.
The landlord of the Coach & Horses was a character called Norman Balon, allegedly the rudest landlord in London.  One day the Prominent Person for that week arrived in the bar and spoke to Norman.  “Excuse me, my good man, can you tell me where the Private Eye lunch is being held?”.  Norman took an instant dislike to the PP and shouted at him:- “Fcuk off you cnut”.  The PP meekly complied and fcuked off. 
Norman felt a bit guilty and went upstairs to give the Private Eye team the bad news.  “Gentlemen, I am very sorry but your guest has left already and I don’t think he is coming back”.  There was an audible sigh of relief all around the room as none of the Private Eye guys were looking forward to meeting that particular Prominent Person.   
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #171 on: October 02, 2012, 05:59:02 PM »
                            Wed May 31 2006
                                                              A rare smile from Norman

At 8pm last Monday, one of Soho’s longest-running performances came to an end. After 63 years of playing the pantomime villain behind the bar, Norman ‘You’re Barred’ Balon, took a standing ovation from a packed Coach and Horses and exited stage left, popping up his green umbrella and disappearing down Greek Street like Mary Poppins as played by Walter Matthau.

Balon began his tenure on February 1 1943, aged 16, helping his parents run the pub. He took over when they retired and it’s the only job he’s ever had. But if he was feeling any emotion you wouldn’t have known it. As a Soho old guard, which included Richard Ingrams, Ian Hislop, Francis Wheen and Beryl Bainbridge, paid tribute in a private party upstairs, Balon simply looked bored. When the regulars downstairs in the bar barracked him with a chorus of ‘For He’s a Jolly Good Fellow’ he looked pained and responded with, ‘Just spend more fackin’ money.’ Typically, Balon’s send-off involved no drinks on the house and all three ales were off.
WHAT A CHARACTER worth a read   http://www.timeout.com/london/bars/features/1486.html
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #172 on: October 02, 2012, 06:12:14 PM »
Good stuff thaiga. Somewhere on the Internet is a Youtube type clip of Norman telling the tale that I set out above.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #173 on: October 02, 2012, 06:39:32 PM »
You have to suffer "MAGIC BETTY" first  ha! ha!

                                               Sing Along Pub London - Magic Betty at Coach and Horses Soho London

Sing Along Pub London - Magic Betty at Coach and Horses Soho London


                                               In Conversation with Norman Balon

In Conversation with Norman Balon


Lets not forget mrs mills
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

  • Guest
Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #174 on: October 02, 2012, 06:50:19 PM »
Good old Betty!

She used to have a monkey with an enamel mug on top of the Johanna collecting tips. It's said that, one evening, a drunken punter who fancied her (you had to be one to do the other) put his pint on the top of the piano, leaned on it  and oggled her. After a few minutes, he notice that the monkey was urinating in his beer.

He said, with understandable indignation, 'Betty, do you know your monkey's pissing in my beer?'

Betty looked up from the keyboard and said, 'No, but you hum it an  I'll play it'.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #175 on: October 02, 2012, 09:58:12 PM »
nice 1 saf  :lol

             
                     
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline dodgeydave

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Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #176 on: October 02, 2012, 10:53:18 PM »
Texas Homecare
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Texas Homecare

Former type   Home Retail
Successor(s)   Homebase
Founded   1972
Defunct   1999
Headquarters   Holborn, London,
United Kingdom
Texas Homecare was a chain of DIY stores in the United Kingdom and Ireland, that operated from 1972 until 1999.
Contents  [hide]
1 History
2 Advertising
3 See also
4 External links
[edit]History

Texas Homecare was established in 1972 by Manny, Sydney and Gerald Fogel, who had previously founded the high street specialist paint and wallpaper chain Home Charm. Taking their lead from America, they revolutionised the UK DIY market, with the introduction of the 'DIY shed' style outlet. Mervyn Fogel, Co-founder and Managing Director for over 25 years had a vision of turning the small family business into a DIY retail empire. Texas specialised in higher volume, lower margin DIY products. The company had been adversely affected by a recession and depressed housing market.
With its acquisition, Homebase hoped to hold around 10% of the total DIY market in the UK. In May 1995 it was announced that only 26 Texas stores were to close, with limited redundancies. Sainsbury's found that full conversion to the Homebase format was an investment worth making and allowed £50 million for the task.
These stores were rebranded and redesigned to the Homebase format, the first to be converted being in Longwell Green in Bristol in February 1996. A few other stores were sold off to other retailers; including the Merry Hill store in the West Midlands, which closed in 1995 and was split between PC World and Currys.
The last 60 Texas stores were converted to Homebase in 1999 and the Texas name vanished from high streets, shopping malls and retail parks.
[edit]Advertising

In its early years Texas was famous for its TV advertising sign-off: 'Texas - THE BIG ONE!' In later years Texas used a fictional character called 'Texas Tom' in its advertising. During the early 1990s, this campaign was altered slightly to refer to Tom's place: "Only at Tom's place!"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Texas_Homecare
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #177 on: October 03, 2012, 04:14:34 PM »
                                       

The words to the ads were set to a country and western dirge, and sung by a very rugged-sounding gent with an American accent, who was apparently called Texas Tom.

                       

But the setting was England - complete with rain.

In one of the ads (I think there were several), a woman was at home, doing the ironing, apparently dreaming of somebody called Texas Tom. The accompanying song's lyrics assured us that he could transform her drab home. So off she went into the rain, headed for her local Texas Homecare store.

                     

During the ad, we saw the back view of a man several times - and it would appear that this was Texas Tom, the hunk doing the singing...

The woman arrived at Texas, soaking wet, asked for Tom, the guy turned around... and he was not what you might expect.

For years, the Texas ads had the slogan "Texas - The Big One" - these ads are usually the first to spring to mind when Texas Homecare is mentioned.

Texas Tom arrived in the late 1980s (the screen capture at the top of this post is from a 1988 video recording) and didn't stick around for long. But the ad had a certain charm - and I remember it fondly.

And guess what? Apparently some customers actually asked for Tom at their local Texas Homecare stores!

                                                               

Texas Tom Advert 1988


                                       
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: luncheon vouchers - all our yesterdays
« Reply #178 on: October 03, 2012, 11:17:59 PM »

                                                     

   

Beatles mystery tour footage shown for first time online

Previously unseen footage of The Beatles shot during the making of a documentary about the Fab Four's
Magical Mystery Tour film has been made available online.

Shot on en route to Newquay, the final destination of the Magical Mystery Tour, the short shows the
Beatles taking a coach trip to a classic British fish and chip shop.



Magical Mystery Tour was first broadcast on the BBC on Boxing Day in 1967. It was broadcast again on
BBC Two in 1979, but has not been shown since.

to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the release of the Beatles's first single, Love Me Do, the film
will be shown alongside a documentary, Arena: The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour, which reassesses its
artistic merit.The Space, which is hosting the new footage online, is a new digital arts service developed
by the Arts Council in partnership with the BBC.

Anthony Wall, editor of BBC arts series Arena, said:“Few people have seen Magical Mystery Tour in its
entirety and the material in the chip shop has never been shown anywhere.

"It captures perfectly the fabulous world of The Beatles at this time. They’re happily rubbing shoulders
and sharing a simple meal with the other passengers on the coach, and at the same time creating an
extraordinarily avant garde film."

Arena: The Beatles’ Magical Mystery Tour is on BBC Two, Saturday October 6, at 9.45pm

or can be viewed here: http://thespace.org/items/e0001554



The Beatles - Magical Mystery Tour Trailer 2012


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: street vendors - all our yesterdays
« Reply #179 on: October 05, 2012, 07:13:45 PM »
                                            



I was always amused by the street vendors.we had a man on a bike come round with a gadget on the front to sharpen knifes with,he would prop the back of the bike up peddle the bike and the grinding wheel would spin  round,then sharpen up whatever,garden shears axes whatever.

                                           

we had a candyfloss man also the rag and bone guy with a horse pulling a cart "any ole rag an lumber"
and people would walk behind the horse picking up the manure to put on their rubarb or whatever,i
prefer custard on mine.

Coloured rag was worth about two pence per pound. Bones,worth about the same,they could be used as
knife handles,toys and ornaments,and when treated,for chemistry.The grease extracted from them was
also useful for soap-making.Let's not forget steptoe and son.

                                                       

then came the icecream man do you remember 99 soft icecream with a cadburys flake in it,juice and nuts
as well if you fancied it.

                                                             the funniest icecream commercial watch 0:20 

World's best ice cream commercial - Very Funny ad


                                         

then there was the catalogue man collecting his weekly dues.freemans was quite a popular catalouge
Based in London, Freemans was at the forefront of the sixties fashion revolution. Carnaby street,
mini skirts, flower power and all this decades fashion was reflected in the catalogues.

in 1963 Freemans becomes a Public Company, and installed its first computer.

Kays Catalogue was another great universal,marshal ward.that was the way it was pay weekly people
would say we got it "on the never never" meaning credit.

People in them days always got life insurance in case they popped of and could not pay for the funeral.
the royal liver ins.was popular which is now the Royal London.the co-op was another well known name.



                                               
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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