Author Topic: old catchphrases "How's Yer Father"  (Read 375 times)

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Offline thaiga

old catchphrases "How's Yer Father"
« on: October 25, 2018, 01:04:10 PM »
Hows your father

Hows your father a long standing understood phrase of ... well! there's so many sayings that mean the same thing, no way is it something sordid and nasty, making love. but the Brits can give it a bit more explicit meaning. although frowned upon by most polite societies, everyone seems to know what it means and has different words for it.  the second world war soldiers soliciting sex from elderly French madames, some shared intimate moments with British soldiers during the First World War too, so the son is going where the father has already been. but there are so many different stories of where the saying come from. one suggestion that it originated in the music halls, as the catchphrase of a man called Harry Tate,

The surprising history of ‘How’s your father’ It’s from the music hall days, but not as dirty as you might think, the chorus went: ‘How’s your father? All right?’ ‘How’s your mother? Half tight. How’s your sister? She might.’ one of the catchphrases, How’s your father, has just been put into the Oxford English Dictionary.

Jack Warner - If A Grey-Haired Lady Says "How's Yer Father" / Boom (1940)


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

surbition

  • Guest
Re: old catchphrases "How's Yer Father"
« Reply #1 on: October 26, 2018, 11:33:00 AM »
well i never,thats jack warner dixon of dock green. George Dixon in the film The Blue Lamp

 

Offline thaiga

Re: old catchphrases " bird in hand"
« Reply #2 on: October 26, 2018, 02:12:27 PM »
A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush
   

what with Hows your father and A bird in the hand is worth two in the bush, one might get the wrong impression as they do sound sexual. the meaning, It's better to have the certainty of a small thing  :-[ than the possibility of a greater one which may come to nothing, even more innuendos.

not a catchphrase more of a proverb, but we all know what it means, but where does it come from. "A byrd in hand - is worth ten flye at large." or "Better one byrde in hande than ten in the wood"  even pubs in the uk were named "Bird in Hand" right back from the middle ages and even to now. remember it is better to keep what you have (a wife) than to risk getting more and ending with nothing. they say it was first found in English in Hugh Rhodes' The Boke of Nurture or Schoole of Good Maners, circa 1530: "A byrd in hand - is worth ten flye at large."
the proverb refers back to medieval falconry

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: old catchphrases "bird in hand"
« Reply #3 on: October 26, 2018, 02:47:49 PM »
In German it's "Ein Spatz in der Hand ist besser als die Taube auf dem Dach!" (A sparrow in the hand is better than the dove on the roof!")
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: old catchphrases "How's Yer Father"
« Reply #4 on: October 26, 2018, 02:58:44 PM »
ha! ha! a bird in the bush
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: old catchphrases A fool and his money are soon parted
« Reply #5 on: October 27, 2018, 12:39:02 AM »
A fool and his money are soon parted

that's a good catchphrase for some here in the los, A fool and his money are soon parted, we all know what it means, some generosity arrives after a few beers, some after a few smiles from a cheeky bar girl with such a cute face, even cuter after a few more beers, so you had to give a tip, not the tip in your trousers though, that might be where A fool and his money are soon parted comes in to play.

so wheres the saying come from, the wisdom of the ancients, way back in the 16th century by Thomas Tusser in Five Hundreth Pointes of Good Husbandrie. A foole & his money, be soone at debate: which after with sorow, repents him to late. wording of the expression comes just a little later, in Dr. John Bridges' Defence of the Government of the Church of England, If they pay a penie or two pence more for the reddinesse of them..let them looke to that, a foole and his money is soone parted. here's some Christmas Cheer by Thomas Tusser

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: old catchphrases - I wold not be in a folis paradyce
« Reply #6 on: October 28, 2018, 11:31:44 AM »
I wold not be in a folis paradyce


is that what we are on here in the land of los, a fool's paradise, makes you wonder with whats going on around us, so much gloom, exchange rates, brexit, price increases, oh! the worry of it all. we come here thinking we got it sorted, was it realy, a state of enjoyment based on false beliefs or hopes, a state of illusory happiness. or even a State of delusive contentment or false hope. sounds awful. fool's paradise dates back to 1400 century a middle english word. "I wold not be in a folis paradyce." in romeo and juliet, 1592 the words were spoke by Shakespeare.  A fool's paradise is a wise man's hell! (Thomas Fuller)                                                                                                                                           
   
                                                                               so this is where shakespear got his words from ;D             
               
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: old catchphrases - go on have a guess
« Reply #7 on: October 28, 2018, 06:28:24 PM »
naughty Mr Chips

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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