Author Topic: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining  (Read 2543 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Johnnie F.

Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« on: August 26, 2014, 03:54:01 PM »
Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining

Man puts lock on seat to stop woman in front reclining it, leading to argument and both being kicked off United Airlines flight

A plane in the US had to be diverted and two passengers removed after one of them started a fight by using a banned device to stop the seat in front reclining.

The spat began on United Airlines flight 1462 because one passenger was using the Knee Defender, a $21.95 lock that attaches to a tray table and jams the reclining mechanism of the seat in front.

The male passenger, seated in a middle seat of row 12, used the device to stop the woman in front of him reclining while he was on his laptop, according to a law enforcement official who spoke on condition of anonymity.

A flight attendant asked him to remove the device and he refused. The woman then stood up, turned around and threw a cup of water at him, the official said.

The dispute on the service from Newark to Denver escalated to the point that the airline decided to divert to Chicago’s O’Hare international airport, according to Transportation Security Administration spokesman Ross Feinstein.

Chicago police and TSA officers met the flight, spoke to the passengers — a man and a woman, both 48 — and “deemed it a customer service issue”, Feinstein said. The TSA would not name the passengers.

The plane then continued to Denver without them, arriving an hour and 38 minutes late, according to the airline’s website.

Both passengers had been sitting in United’s “economy plus” section, which advertises four more inches of legroom.

The Federal Aviation Administration leaves it up to individual airlines to set rules about the device. United Airlines says it prohibits its use, like all major US airlines. Spirit Airlines and Allegiant Air take the reclining mechanisms out of their seats, leaving them permanently upright.

The FAA can impose a civil fine of up to $25,000 for passengers who are unruly. In this case no arrest was made, according to airport spokesman Gregg Cunningham.

The Guardian

Oh my, we're not out of the summer hole, yet! ;D
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #1 on: August 27, 2014, 10:40:52 AM »
The "Knee Defender":





Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Chimera

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #2 on: August 27, 2014, 11:30:30 AM »
Its about time airlines started to rethink this issue. HTF you can allow people to recline their seats when the poor individual sat behind is literally trapped in his seat unless he too reclines his seat.

Thats my experience sat in cattle class.

 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #3 on: August 27, 2014, 12:00:03 PM »
Airlines' attitude is: "If you want more room, buy a more expensive ticket, then we don't have to cram so many into a plane to turn profit!"
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #4 on: August 27, 2014, 06:02:04 PM »
Economy class seating on a Pan Am 747 in the '60's


pic @MandalaySamui
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Roger

  • posting on moderation row
  • Korat forum specialist
  • *
  • Posts: 1572
  • Thanked: 43 times
  • Karma: 1
Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #5 on: August 27, 2014, 06:52:39 PM »
Chimera I agree but as the seats are designed that way, it should be ok to use the recline function - but politely. Those extra few lolling inches are important when trying to rest or kip ! Agreed a rethink is a good idea. Better still - travel Club Class !! I wish.
Thaiga that's a stunning pic from history with adequate legroom in the front row !
 

Offline Roger

  • posting on moderation row
  • Korat forum specialist
  • *
  • Posts: 1572
  • Thanked: 43 times
  • Karma: 1
Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #6 on: August 27, 2014, 07:27:17 PM »
I've just caught up with you lot ! I didn't know you can actually buy a set of 'knee defenders' for £15.
IMHO those that buy and wish to use them are more than a bit cheeky.
You buy a seat on a plane and then you must be entitled to use it politely to the extent of it's use, as designed.
Airlines need to ban knee defenders of course but as Chimera said, a rethink is needed on seat design/leg room before more flights are disrupted.
It's depressing that people can't share adjacent seats without abuse and scrapping - no wonder the World is full of wars etc.
What hope is there ? I think I'd be rather angry if some tossers caused a re-routing of a flight.

In a similar vein, I returned next to a Brit. on BA on July 31st. Gary from Dagenham, after telling me loudly for an hour (while an engine oil filter was changed) what he was going to do to most of the ladies in Pattaya, drank about 10 flight bottles of wine pestered out of the Stewardesses, shouted 'Oi Pooftah' at the Chief Steward when most of us were kipping in the dark, got up for the toilet every 15 minutes, argued with the flight staff for 15 minutes, slumped asleep cursing and then snored loudly. I honestly thought we might be landing in Lahore ! The bugger woke up in the morning, looked at me and said, 'Have a Good Night Mate ?'. I talked him through it firmly enough and it was quite funny - he kept saying 'I didn't do that did I ?'. Quite remorseful .........
ATB
 

Offline Al

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2014, 08:19:45 PM »
My back would be killing me, especially on the longer flights, if I could not recline my seat.
 

Offline Chimera

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #8 on: August 28, 2014, 07:12:06 AM »
Airlines' attitude is: "If you want more room, buy a more expensive ticket, then we don't have to cram so many into a plane to turn profit!"

They could sacrifice some profit to ensure passenger comfort in cattle class, i'm not holding my breath  :lol
 

Offline Chimera

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2014, 07:14:15 AM »
Chimera I agree but as the seats are designed that way, it should be ok to use the recline function - but politely. Those extra few lolling inches are important when trying to rest or kip ! Agreed a rethink is a good idea. Better still - travel Club Class !! I wish.
Thaiga that's a stunning pic from history with adequate legroom in the front row !

Incredible pic, i wonder if they made any profit on seat sales, of course they did, i'd be interested in what the seats cost in relation to earnings. I would be in favour of having no reclination on seats in cattle class if airlines won't allow sufficient room to ensure passenger comfort. I'm a portly gentleman and with the seat in front on recline i have trouble getting out or even moving forward, i'm trapped..........

The sale and use of these knee defenders is guaranteed to cause problems between passengers.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: To recline or not to recline? Airplane "legroom wars"
« Reply #10 on: August 31, 2014, 01:07:43 PM »
Fun flying: The Legroom War

WASHINGTON - To recline or not to recline? Airplane "legroom wars" are prompting growing rage in the United States, with two recent seat battles sparking a heated debate about the knee-bumping practice.

Amid the furore, one thing everyone seems to agree on is that space on passenger planes is getting scarcer and scarcer.

The question of reclining etiquette "has been a topic of discussion for many years," said Sarah Schlichter, editor in chief of IndependentTraveler.com.

"But the current uproar seems to be a sign that people are simply not happy fliers anymore."

Within just a few days, two aircraft were re-routed because of passengers fighting over a seat recline.

On a United Airlines flight between Newark, New Jersey and Denver, Colorado -- which was detoured to Chicago -- one passenger even used a "Knee Defender" to hold his position.

The $22 gadget consists of two clips that attach to tray table arms to block the seat in front of them from leaning back.

Sales of the gadget "in the past two and a half years have been increasing on a continuous angle," said its inventor, Ira Goldman, without giving precise figures.

"People are travelling more, on more crowded planes, the space is smaller and the airlines still provides seats that recline," added the six-foot-three (1.92-meter) entrepreneur who says he flies 150,000 kilometres a year.

For the past week, commentary, often tongue-in-cheek, has abounded, denouncing the cramped seats and taking sides in the undeclared war between the too-tall versus the - generally inadvertent - strikes of the knee crushers in the next row.

"The war between recliners and legroomers is escalating," joked website Gawker.com on Friday.

Slate.com's Dan Kois was unafraid to take sides, saying "tilting your seat back on an airplane is pure evil."

He described a cross-country flight with "the deceptively nice-seeming schoolteacher's seatback so close to my chin that to watch TV I must nearly cross my eyes."

But in The New York Times, Josh Barro defended the recliners.

"I fly a lot. When I fly, I recline. I don't feel guilty about it," he wrote.

The "Knee Defender" inventor, who created his gadget more than a decade ago, however, is ready to move on.

"I would be gratified if the airline industry would solve the problem that they have been ignoring for so many years," he said.

In fact, a Wall Street Journal study in October 2013 found that airlines were reducing space for economy class passengers in order to make more room for first and business class passengers, who pay far higher ticket prices.

The norm for long flights has gone from around 18 inches (46 centimeters) in the 1970s and 1980s, briefly up to 18.5 inches before shrinking down to just 17 inches in recent years, the newspaper reported.

In comparison, legroom on a typical US train is more like 20 inches.

To stop the legroom battles, some low-cost carriers, like easyJet and Ryanair, have removed the reclining option on short flights.

"Baggage restrictions and fees, the loss of meal services, tighter seating and more for-fee upgrades that reduce the basic experience, all contribute to more aggravation for fliers," said Schlichter.

Etiquette experts say leaning back is every passenger's right - but beware about pushing too hard to exercise it.

"You purchase that as part of your ticket price, and no other passenger has the right to prevent you from reclining your seat," said Anna Post, one of the directors of a famous school of etiquette, the Emily Post Institute.

"We may be right, but trying to pursue being right may cause more trouble that it's worth," she said, advising passengers to lean back slowly "so you don't slam into someone."

"Sometimes just a little bit is enough to be more comfortable."

Bangkokpost
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Plane diverted as passengers fight over seat reclining
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2014, 05:24:56 PM »
And on it goes...

New York-to-Florida flight grounded after fight over reclining seat

JACKSONVILLE (WABC) --
An argument between two passengers caused the pilot of a Delta flight from New York to Florida to make an unscheduled landing.

The LaGuardia-to-West Palm Beach Flight 2370 was diverted to Jacksonville after taking off around 7 p.m. Monday.

Eyewitnesses say the trouble began when a passenger who was sleeping on a tray table became angry when the woman in front of her reclined the seat.

"The flight attendant came over, and that just exasperated what was going on, and then she demanded that the flight land," one passenger said. "She said something to the effect of, 'I don't care about the consequences, put this plane down now.'"

But 32-year-old Amy Fine of Boca Raton tells authorities she wasn't aggressive, just emotional over the death of her two dogs.

The flight landed in Jacksonville, where the woman was taken into police custody. Passengers went on to West Palm Beach a few hours later. The airport authority report says Fine wasn't arrested and was allowed to go home in a rental car.

Delta issued the following statement:

"Delta Flight 2370 from New York-LaGuardia to West Palm Beach was re-routed to Jacksonville International Airport due to a passenger disruption. Out of an abundance of caution, the captain elected to divert to the closest airport. Local law enforcement met the flight and removed the passenger. The aircraft continued to West Palm Beach arrived at 11:13 p.m. We apologize for the inconvenience to customers."

ABC eye witness news
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

 



Thailand
Statistics