Author Topic: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima  (Read 2847 times)

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dirtydog

  • Guest
Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« on: December 04, 2009, 11:52:57 PM »
So what do you do on a Friday night in Korat? I was going to go out and get drunk, probably in some gogo bars, sadly I'm still working and have more to do, I hope your Friday night was more entertaining than mine :)
 

silverfox

  • Guest
Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #1 on: December 10, 2009, 11:21:41 PM »
My first weekend in Korat I was taken to a Country & Western bar, this place is masive, I think I was among only a handful of falang amongst what appeared to be 1000's of happy drunken Thais, I don't know the name or location but we got a Tuk Tuk from K S Pavillion hotel which was only about 200 baht and no more than a 10 minute ride.

Bloody good night out.
 

silverfox

  • Guest
Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #2 on: December 10, 2009, 11:24:17 PM »
And just so you know, it wasn't anything like Country and western  :D ;D
 

geordie

  • Guest
Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #3 on: December 11, 2009, 09:59:12 AM »
Looks as though you were at Dawan Deng in Pailin Square which is certainly not a country & western bar. Paying 200 baht for a Tuk Tuk from the KS Pavillion you were ripped off 40-60 baht would have the correct fare
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #4 on: December 18, 2009, 07:19:41 PM »
Is a geordie a person from Newcastle?
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2009, 07:58:14 PM »
Is a geordie a person from Newcastle?

That's what wikipedia says:

Geordie is a regional nickname for a person from the Tyneside region of England, or the name of the English dialect spoken by its inhabitants. Depending on who is using the term, the catchment area for the term Geordie can, depending on the speaker be as big as the whole of north east of England, or as small as the city of Newcastle upon Tyne. Sunderland, however, uses the regional nickname "Mackem" as opposed to Geordie. Similarly, people from the Teesside area (Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees, Redcar, Billingham and surrounding settlements) of the north east are known as 'Smoggies'.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

dirtydog

  • Guest
Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #6 on: December 18, 2009, 08:23:12 PM »
Well another Friday night and I shall be working again, probably nip out and get a bottle of scotch to keep me going :)
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #7 on: December 19, 2009, 07:45:48 AM »
Is a geordie a person from Newcastle?

That's what wikipedia says:

Geordie is a regional nickname for a person from the Tyneside region of England, or the name of the English dialect spoken by its inhabitants. Depending on who is using the term, the catchment area for the term Geordie can, depending on the speaker be as big as the whole of north east of England, or as small as the city of Newcastle upon Tyne. Sunderland, however, uses the regional nickname "Mackem" as opposed to Geordie. Similarly, people from the Teesside area (Middlesbrough, Stockton-on-Tees, Redcar, Billingham and surrounding settlements) of the north east are known as 'Smoggies'.


Hooligan?
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Friday Night in Nakhon Ratchasima
« Reply #8 on: December 19, 2009, 08:16:14 AM »
Hooligan?

Don't you know how to look up the definition of terms on the internet yourself, BF? ;D

"Hooliganism refers to unruly and destructive behaviour. Such behaviour is commonly associated with sports fans, particularly supporters of association football and university sports. In some countries, the hooligan elements of a group of supporters are known as Category C. The term can also apply to general rowdy behaviour and vandalism, often under the influence of alcohol or drugs." (Wikipedia)

There has been known hooliganism after baseball and (American) football games in the US and after matches of association football in various countries of Europe. It's fairly independent from regions. Maybe employment situations and econimic outlook in various regions appear to be associated. It needs to be explained by mass psychology.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

 



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