Author Topic: Chivalry Is Dead In Korat  (Read 1075 times)

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Offline thaiga

Chivalry Is Dead In Korat
« on: April 26, 2016, 12:49:39 PM »
Chivalry Is Dead In Korat

After being stuck in an elevator for hours on end you’d think they’d let the ladies out first, right?

Chivalry Is Dead In Korat

from_the_stickboynetwork-credit@stickboybangkok.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
The following users thanked this post: nan

Offline nan

Re: Chivalry Is Dead In Korat
« Reply #1 on: April 26, 2016, 06:21:12 PM »
i think men scared their kind deeds will taken the wrong way
ignorance does not help your post one bit but it probably says an awful lot about you.
 

Online Baby Farts

Re: Chivalry Is Dead In Korat
« Reply #2 on: April 27, 2016, 09:17:39 PM »
Have you ever experienced when the elevator you are on arrives at your floor and you try to get out?  Thais will come rushing in before anyone can even exit. WTF is up with that? 

Here's another thing off topic, but something I want to mention.  Why the hell do so many Thais have to drive with their Fog lights on??????  I've changed all the lights in my truck to 10,400 Lumens LEDs.....let me tell you something, this is just as much fun as the Train horn was on my old truck. 
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Chivalry May Not Be Dead - It's Just Women Who Are Doing It
« Reply #3 on: April 30, 2016, 07:23:12 PM »
Chivalry May Not Be Dead...It's Just Women Who Are Doing It

Are men just selfish? Or is their more to the story?

A new survey suggests that women are actually the one's performing "gentlemanly" behaviors — i.e. giving up seats for the elderly or expecting mothers. "Women are 12 percent more likely to say hello to a complete stranger," the survey states, and women are "7 percent more likely to hold the door open." Are men just selfish? Or is their more to the story?

The Telegraph’s Louisa Peacock suggests that men have abandoned chivalry for fear “of getting it wrong.” “There's also the argument that traditional acts of chivalry are frowned upon as ‘suspicious,’” she writes. “Men are nervous their acts of kindness will be taken the wrong way – or send the wrong signal.” And Peacock has a point. In a time of over-analyzing everything — each text message, Facebook like, e-mail — there's so much pressure on both sexes to get things right when it comes to interactions with the opposite gender.

full article thedailybeast.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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