Author Topic: How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH  (Read 1172 times)

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Offline thaiga

How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH
« on: December 02, 2013, 06:40:20 PM »
How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH: Status updates about prostitutes, decapitation and pornography can indicate a 'dark personality'

•Study found Facebook can also reveal narcissistic and Machiavellian traits

•Their study was based on status updates from over 300 Americans

For most people, most of the time, Facebook is a bright and breezy place where they share holiday and baby photos and brag about great parties they’ve been to.

But the social media site has a darker side, because a new study reveals that status updates can reveal a range of personality traits, including if someone has psychopathic tendencies.

Researchers from Sahlgrenska Academy and Lund University in Sweden found that status updates that indicated psychopathy could concern prostitutes, decapitation, pornography and butchers.

People with psychopathic traits are strongly focused on their own wishes, and have a lack of empathy for others. These people often break norms and rules, and have a higher inclination to commit crime, the researchers said.

Those with narcissistic personality traits could emphasise their own good characteristics by, for example, noting that others did not understand what true happiness is, the study found.
People with narcissistic traits are self-absorbed, self-glorifying and have an exaggerated confidence in their own abilities.
Neurotic personality traits can also be discerned from the analysis of the status updates and are also discerned by how many friends you have on Facebook and how often you update your status

The study also shows that Facebook users with extrovert and open personalities generally have many friends on Facebook and update their status more often than others.

People with Machiavellian traits, meanwhile, are cynical, emotionally distant and unaffected by morals. They deceive and manipulate people in their surroundings to gain advantages.
The research was based on personality tests and content analyses in status updates on Facebook for just over 300 Americans and is the first of its kind.

‘Facebook has revolutionised how people interact on the Internet, and this offers a unique opportunity for psychological research,’ said Danilo Garcia, researcher at Sahlgrenska Academy's research centre, the Centre for Ethics, Law and Mental Health.

The Facebook users answered a scientific questionnaire with questions that test extrovert, neurotic, psychopathic, narcissistic and Machiavellian personality traits. They also sent in their 15 most recent status updates.

The contents of the status updates were then studied with algorithms for latent semantic analysis, which is a method for measuring the significance of words.
For those people who've read status updates from friends that seem bizarre, Lund University psychologist Sverker Sikström, who was involved in the study, has some words of comfort.
He told The Local: 'Even if you show psychopathic personality traits on Facebook, that doesn't automatically mean you are a psychopath.'
The study, called The dark Side Of Facebook, is published in the scientific journal Personality And Individual Differences.

dailymail.co.uk
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline takeitor

Re: How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2013, 07:07:48 PM »
Thaiga, Thaiga, is that a deliberate red rag to the proverbial bull!?  ;)

Those with narcissistic personality traits could emphasise their own good characteristics by, for example, noting that others did not understand what true happiness is, the study found.
People with narcissistic traits are self-absorbed, self-glorifying and have an exaggerated confidence in their own abilities.
Neurotic personality traits can also be discerned from the analysis of the status updates and are also discerned by how many friends you have on Facebook and how often you update your status

All I can say is that Facebook is:
  • A Psychologist's best wet dream
  • A Narcissist's 2nd best wet dream (after the one about themselves of course)
  • A paranoid (old-fashioned) delinquent's worst nightmare
 

Offline thaiga

Re: How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2013, 08:14:40 PM »
is that a deliberate red rag to the proverbial bull  :lol :lol :lol

People Without Facebook Accounts Are 'Suspicious

The term “Crackberry” seems silly today — and not just because consumers OD’ed on Blackberry and moved on to iDealers. The term arose in an earlier “aughts” time when Blackberry dominated the smartphone market and lawyers and execs were nearly the only ones who had them, due to their need to be able to respond to email immediately. Things have changed. Now we all need to be able to respond to email immediately. And to tweet. And to instantly share our photos on Facebook. We’re all addicted to technology now, and not just to the Blackberry. We’re “addicted” to our iPhones, and Facebook, and Twitter, and Android, and Pinterest, and iPads, and Word with Friends, and fill-in-the-blank-with-your-digital-dope-of-choice.

The sudden and dramatic advent of social-media-enabling technologies into our lives seems to be causing some mid-digital-life crises. Not only has Silicon Valley developed a guilty conscience about addicting us to screens, we the users are starting to question how technology is changing us: making us fat, making us unhealthy, making us depressed, making us lonely, making us narcissistic, and making us waste time worrying about whether it’s making us fat, unhealthy, depressed, narcissistic and/or lonely. That’s leading some users to consider abandoning the whole enterprise. My colleague Haydn Shaughnessy gave up his smartphone last year. Now, inspired by the example of former Facebooker Katherine Losse, he’s considering giving up Facebook.

I am writing with some words of caution. I used to say that “if you’re not on Facebook, it’s possible you don’t actually exist.” I think it’s time to update that, courtesy of Slashdot: Facebook abstainers will be labeled suspicious

Slashdot flagged a German news story in which an expert noted that mass murderers Anders Breivik and James Holmes both lacked much of a social media presence, leading to the conclusion, in Slashdot’s phrasing, that “not having a Facebook account could be the first sign that you are a mass murderer.”

There's more if youre not bored already forbes.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline takeitor

Re: How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2013, 11:14:56 PM »
Look at the positive side, by not joining, it is actually less likely that you'll meet / date / be employed by someone who judges people by their Facebook profile alone.  I see that as a reason for many people to convert to the religion of NOT Facebook.  I've already tracked down NOT Google+ to their headquarters at the link below:

http://www.collegehumor.com/video/6611967/not-google-plus

Brutally American, but I found it quite amusing.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2013, 01:05:32 PM »
Nice 1

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Facebook user falls off pier
« Reply #5 on: December 18, 2013, 09:04:28 PM »


All I can say is that Facebook is:
  • A Psychologist's best wet dream
  • A Narcissist's 2nd best wet dream (after the one about themselves of course)
  • A paranoid (old-fashioned) delinquent's worst nightmare
Certainly is a wet dream

Facebook user falls off pier

SYDNEY - A tourist in Australia had to be rescued by police after plunging off a pier while browsing Facebook on her phone, officials said on Wednesday.

The woman was walking along a bay in Melbourne on Monday night when she became distracted by her Facebook feed and plummeted off the pier into the chilly water, Victoria state police said.

A witness called for help and police rushed to the woman's aid. They found her flailing around in the water, about 20 metres (65 feet) from the pier.

"She was still out in the water lying on her back in a floating position because she told us later that she couldn't swim," Senior Constable Dean Kelly of the state water police told the Australian Broadcasting Corp. "She still had her mobile phone in her hand and initially she apologised and said sorry."

The woman was taken to a hospital for treatment. Police said she is a foreigner, but declined to say from which country.

"With Facebook, or social media in general as far as we're concerned, if you're anywhere near the water just pay attention," Kelly said. "Especially if you can't swim."

bangkokpost

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Milito

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Re: How Facebook reveals if you're a PSYCHOPATH
« Reply #6 on: January 04, 2014, 04:13:53 PM »
Also reveal how many tigers man hide behind a keyboard:and for real just poor,shit in his pants,man
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Facebook battles to stay young and cool
« Reply #7 on: February 02, 2014, 02:30:55 PM »
Sixteen-year-old Owen Fairchild doesn't hang out at Facebook as much as he did when he was just a kid.

It is not that he and his friends are abandoning the social network. They are spreading their love to rival networks like Twitter, Pinterest, SnapChat, Instagram and blogging platform Tumblr.

"I've moved on," the teenager said. "I go to Tumblr a lot more; there is a lot of funny stuff. SnapChat is super-fun because you can send really unattractive pictures of yourself and they will delete after a few seconds."

Contrary to what grownups might think, teens sometimes prefer to catch up on life face-to-face in the real world, he added.

"I think Facebook is still very popular even though some people might be losing interest," said the 11th-grade student at Alameda Community Learning Centre, a charter school in

Alameda across the bay from San Francisco.

"There is no talk among my friends saying Facebook is for old people."

Facebook, born on a college campus a decade ago, has grown to 1.23 billion active users worldwide.

But as it prepares to celebrate its 10th anniversary, Facebook is now facing challenges in keeping its original base of young users as new social networks vie to be the coolest on the internet.

A social networking trend set in motion by Facebook has been accelerated by soaring popularity of smartphones that let people share images, videos, thoughts or observations at any moment.

Hot young services such as Pinterest, Twitter and SnapChat have sparked concerns that Facebook is losing teens and may follow predecessor MySpace into social networking obscurity.

Facebook's demographics appear to be shifting as adults, even seniors, use the network to catch up with long-lost friends and stay connected to family and colleagues.

Princeton University student Susannah Sharpless said she and friends have stopped letting Facebook consume their lives.

"Everyone in my friend group went through this stage where we hated Facebook and deleted it," Miss Sharpless told AFP.

"I was one of the first people to get it back. Slowly, everyone did."

Breaking from Facebook served as a detox period during which she and friends got a better handle on what was a daily habit, the college junior said.

"I realised how to live without the mindless Facebook stalking that I used to do," Miss Sharpless said.

"I check my Twitter feed all the time; there is nothing that I definitely need to know on Facebook."

She also finds more interesting fare on Instagram, which Facebook bought about two years ago in a billion-dollar deal.

"Facebook isn't done," Miss Sharpless said. "I think it is just changing in the way people use it."

Social media network analytics company Socialbakers on Thursday posted findings indicating that "the sky is not falling" when it comes to Facebook's appeal to the younger set.

Interactions at Facebook by people ages 13 to 24 grew about 29% last year, according to Socialbakers.

"Teens are definitely not leaving en masse as some reports would have you believe," Socialbakers data specialist Ben Harper said in a blog post.

During an earnings call this week, top Facebook executives sidestepped a question about whether the social network was losing teens.

"We are working on great products that all our users, including teens, will take seriously," said Facebook chief financial officer David Ebersman.

Forrester Research analyst Nate Elliott dismissed Facebook gloom-and-doom talk as "silly." He argued that, unlike the defunct MySpace, Facebook innovates relentlessly and copies winning features from competitors.

For example, Facebook has woven Twitter-style real-time status updates into the service and introduced a new mobile app aimed at becoming a social newspaper of sorts.

Young people might change how they use Facebook, but they aren't leaving, according to the Forrester analyst.

"It is not a zero-sum game," Mr Elliott said. "You don't stop using one network because you start using another."

Forrester is preparing to release results of a youth survey that the analyst said contradict the "breathless proclamations of doom" about Facebook.

"When you strip away the hyperbole and just look at the numbers, Facebook is absolutely crushing all the other social networks in terms of young users who go there," Mr Elliott said.

Independent Silicon Valley analyst Rob Enderle countered that some studies in recent months indicate young people are departing Facebook in a shift that should worry the social network.

"The youth is your seed corn to make sure your service grows; they drive something like this," Mr Enderle said. "The trendy kids at school need to be at Facebook."

bangkokpost
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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