Author Topic: Labour lauds registration of alien workers  (Read 707 times)

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Offline Johnnie F.

Labour lauds registration of alien workers
« on: June 15, 2011, 11:12:59 AM »
Labour lauds registration of alien workers

Legal migrants less likely to be harassed

Labour experts on Monday hailed the next round of foreign worker registration, set to begin today, saying it could help prevent migrant workers from being abused.

Many foreign workers were interested in registering their employment status with the government as well as applying for work permits, which helped them to avoid harassment by unscrupulous police and poor treatment by employers.

If registered foreign workers feel safer they would be more willing to speak up for their rights and have more employment opportunities, said Sompong Sakaew, director of the Labour Rights Promotion Network Foundation.

The next round of registration for foreign workers who have illegally entered the country is from today until July 14, said Anurak Thotsarat, the director of the Office of Foreign Workers.

Foreign workers and their employers may download registration forms on the Department of Employment's website: http://www.doe.go.th.

Registration will be held at the Office of Foreign Workers' one-stop service centres in 17 provinces - Bangkok, Chai Nat, Saraburi, Phetchabun, Khon Kaen, Krabi, Ranong, Mae Hong Son, Samut Sakhon, Trat, Chiang Rai, Lampang, Udon Thani, Phuket, Pathum Thani and Samut Prakan.

Wandee Seebua-iam from the Foreign Workers Employers Club said registered foreign workers with work permits would have more job opportunities. They can change their employment details later if they change their workplace.

A labour source said unregistered foreign workers and their employers were prone to extortion by corrupt police officers who threaten them with arrest.

For fear of further harassment, even some registered workers with work permits tend to agree to pay those corrupt officers between 500 and 1,000 baht, while those who did not have work permits would have to pay between 4,000 and 5,000 baht.

Bunyalit Saenphan, chief labour welfare protection officer in Samut Sakhon province, said work permits give foreign the courage to reveal their identities when seeking necessary assistance from government agencies and non-government organisations.

Bangkok Post
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