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Topic Summary

Posted by: nan
« on: June 28, 2017, 06:07:49 PM »

the ‘Hungry Ghosts’ are a product of Karma,a punishment dealt through the process of reincarnation for a life lived selfishly,they are said to have huge bloated stomachs, and tiny necks or mouths through which it is impossible to ever pass enough food to sate its appetite and quench its hunger. there satisfaction, by feeding on the emotions and actions of the living.  think about it, nearly every pain, or "punishment" can be used as a tool for learning, and bettering your life. Now or in the next.

here is the video from the pic in the above post above, i know you will just love it  ;D

บ้านผีปอบ 2008




Posted by: thaiga
« on: June 28, 2017, 03:45:35 PM »

Cops Deployed to Protect Isaan Community From Hungry Ghost


A woman possessed by Phi Pob terrorizes villagers in a scene from “Baan Phi Pob 2008,” the 13th installment of the Baan Phi Pob movies franchise.

“There’s nothing under the sky that Thai police cannot do,” goes the unofficial slogan of the Royal Thai Police – and that apparently includes busting ghosts.

Police were dispatched Wednesday to a rural community in Amnat Charoen province to protect it from a female ghost, or phi pob, said to have been terrorizing its populace in recent months. The operation followed a written request from its leaders, according to a local police chief.

“The residents are frightened,” Adul Chaiprasithikul, head of Pathum Ratchawongsa Police Station, said by phone. “The letter requests police to conduct regular patrols … they want some reassurance. The people who believe in the rumor are genuinely scared.”

The letter, penned by the district chief, said four cows there had died this year alone; and that four officers at a nearby border patrol police academy had fallen ill. Local residents attributed these calamities to a phi pob, it said.

According to folklore, phi pob is a ghost with the ability to possess humans and wreak havoc on an entire village. Every year, many rural communities report sightings or hauntings by phi pob.

“To strengthen civilian morale, prevent panic and boost their confidence in living their daily lives, I hereby request Pathum Ratchawongsa Police Station to organize patrols in the subdistrict to monitor safety for the civilians,” part of the letter said.

Col. Adul said he received the request yesterday and that police would make their first patrol today.

He added that a Buddhist ceremony was also held at the village two weeks ago in hope of stopping the ghost’s menace.

“There are more people who believe in it than those who don’t,” the colonel said.

khaosodenglish.com


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