• Welcome to Thailand-Forum for Expats and Travellers - The Koratforum for Art, News & Culture. Please login or sign up.
 

R.I.P.Guys - James Bond star Honor Blackman dies aged 94

Started by thaiga, April 07, 2020, 07:06:58 PM

Previous topic - Next topic

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

thaiga

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Millie Small: My Boy Lollipop singer dies aged 73

Jamaican singer Millie Small has died at the age of 73 after suffering a stroke. The star was most famous for her hit single My Boy Lollipop, which reached number two in both the US and the UK in 1964.




Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

2020 is something else. May these two musical geniuses Rest in Power! Little Richard and Andre Harrell two of the best that ever did it!           


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Taman Tun

This obit from The Times. 

He was the musician who encouraged a generation of teenagers to pick up the guitar but Peter Green's own career was marred by psychedelic drugs and mental illness.

Last night, the world of rock and blues was in mourning after the death of the Fleetwood Mac co-founder at the age of 73. Green, nicknamed the Green God by fans, formed the band with drummer Mick Fleetwood and bass guitarist John McVie in London in 1967. He was so instrumental in the band's early years that its original name was Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac.

Their greatest hits included Albatross, Man of the World, Oh Well and The Green Manalishi. After he left the band, he missed out on their biggest success, the 1977 Rumours album.

To some music fans, Green — born Peter Greenbaum in Bethnal Green in 1946 — was the best of the British blues guitarists, even greater than Eric Clapton. The singer-songwriter BB King once said Green "has the sweetest tone I ever heard. He was the only one who gave me the cold sweats."

Cat Stevens wrote in a tweet last night: "God bless the ineffable Peter Green, one of the unsung heroes of musical integrity, innovation and spirit . . . He became something of a model for me."

Fleetwood Mac enjoyed staggering success, with four hit albums. In 1969, the band sold more records than The Rolling Stones and The Beatles, combined, and Green became one of the most famous musicians in Europe. But he left the band at the height of its fame after a final performance in 1970. He said he was leaving the music business "for my freedom" but was also suffering from mental health issues, and was hearing voices. He later had schizophrenia diagnosed.

He had gone off the rails after taking LSD. In 1996, he admitted that the drug had left a lasting impression on him. "I'm still there. . . I never did come back off the trip. I guess I took one trip too many," he told The Daily Telegraph.

While on tour in Munich, Germany, to promote their third album, Then Play On, matters came to a head. "Peter took some more drugs," said Mick Fleetwood in the 2012 BBC documentary Man of the World, "and never really came back from that."

Green was met by a group of people Fleetwood referred to as "the German Jetset," who whisked him away to a party after their show. "It was a hippie commune sort of thing," said Fleetwood Mac guitarist Jeremy Spencer.

"We arrived there, and [road manager] Dennis Keane comes up to me shaking and says, 'It's so weird, don't go down there. Pete is weirding out big time and the vibes are just horrible.'"

Green was already set to leave the band, but this was, said Fleetwood, "the final nail in the coffin". Friends say he was never the same after the "Munich incident". He began to give away his guitars and, and after he left the band, had a series of odd jobs, including a gravedigger. In the following years he spent time in various psychiatric hospitals and underwent electro-shock therapy.

Green was never enamoured with either fame or money. As the royalty cheques flooded in as Fleetwood Mac became ever more successful in the 1970s and news fans scoured the back catalogue, Green did not want the cash or the attention. He was trying to enjoy a much simpler life.

Green contacted a former Fleetwood Mac manager about his finances — because he was upset the money kept pouring in. In January 1977, armed with a shotgun, he went to see his accountant, David Simmons, and threatened to shoot him. The police were called and Green ended up in jail.

"I was quite happy in prison, so I thought I'd be all right," Green said. "But they said, 'You failed the psychiatrist test.'"

He endured long stretches of mental illness and destitution in the 1970s and 1980s, later moved in with his older brother Len, and his mother in their house in Great Yarmouth, where he started to recover.

In 1977, Fleetwood Mac, without Green, released Rumours, which sold more than 45 million copies worldwide.

Green married Jane Samuels in January 1978. The couple had a daughter, Rosebud Samuels-Greenbaum, but divorced in 1979.

With advances in treatments for schizophrenia, he began to recover and took up the guitar again in 1996. He then formed the Peter Green Splinter Group, which recorded nine albums during their time together.

In February, a concert was held at the London Palladium in Green's honour, with performances by rock royalty including Dave Gilmour of Pink Floyd, who played a rendition of Albatross, and Noel Gallagher of Oasis, who performed three of the band's early acoustic numbers.

Last night, the guitarist Bernie Marsden of the band Whitesnake, who saw him recently, shared his memories of Green in a long tribute on social media.

"I can't quite express my feelings this afternoon after learning of Peter's death," he wrote on Instagram.

"I'm just thinking of the times we spent together in the last couple of years, hanging out with him at his home was very special.

"There I was, sat with my hero. As a musician I can only be one of the millions he touched, his talent for guitar playing, vocals and harmonica would have been more than most people could have possibly wished for, and then you add those wonderful songs, original, vibrant, atmospheric, outright psychedelic and so much fun, to listen to and witness."

The rock singer David Coverdale, formerly of Whitesnake, also paid tribute to Green on Twitter: "An artist I truly loved and admired from the first time I heard him. I supported the original Fleetwood Mac at Redcar Jazz Club when I was in a local band. He was a breathtaking singer, guitarist and composer."

John Mcvie, a former bandmate in Fleetwood Mac, previously said of Green: "He was one of the best, if not the best. That's why it's such a tragedy that it all went the way it did. He could have been so much more."
If the old only could, if the young only knew.

thaiga

Gone with the Wind star Olivia de Havilland dies aged 104   scmp.com
Last surviving actress of Hollywood's Golden Age died of natural causes at her home in Paris

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Taman Tun

Here is edited (to meet forum 10,000 character limit) obit from the Times:-


Hollywood's "golden age" produced an unforgettable galaxy of stars. None burnt brighter or for longer than Dame Olivia de Havilland, yet she was admirably modest about her success. "One can't be on top all the time," she said.

The two-time Oscar winner will be remembered by audiences for her performances as Melanie in Gone with the Wind (1939); as Jody, a pregnant teenager, in To Each His Own (1946); as Virginia, a terrified schizophrenic, in The Snake Pit (1948); and as Catherine, forced to choose between love and money, in The Heiress (1949). Just as likely to stick in the mind, for the obvious spark between her and her co-star Errol Flynn, were her roles in such over-the-top extravaganzas as Captain Blood, The Charge of the Light Brigade and The Adventures of Robin Hood.

Off camera, De Havilland's greatest role — the one she was born to play — was that of Hollywood leading lady, for which she wrote all her own lines, delivered to perfection over almost eight decades. Highly intelligent, with a sophistication that was never an act, she was at all times her own woman, acutely aware of the nature of the movie business and of the restrictions as well as the challenges that it presented.


One of the most enduring challenges that she faced in her personal life was her relationship with her younger sister, Joan Fontaine, almost equally as famous an actress.

Born in Japan during the First World War, they were raised by their English parents in Tokyo before moving with their mother to San Francisco. There they separately conceived the ambition to become actresses. Neither had cause to regret the choice. Having achieved early success, they went on to become big stars and pillars of the Hollywood establishment. It was, however, their childhood, torn between an uncommitted father with a penchant for geisha girls and a domineering mother who took them to America, that decided their relationship.

Olivia, the elder of the two by 15 months, resented her younger sister. The two fought throughout their childhood and teenage years. "I can't remember a single act of kindness by Olivia," Joan told an interviewer in 1979.

When Joan won an Oscar in 1942 for her role in Suspicion, a grim tale of class hatred and gold-digging, Olivia was said to have been incandescent with jealousy and rage. She was the talented actress, not Joan. After that the two didn't speak for the next 40 years, not even at their mother's memorial.

Olivia need not have worried. Her acting career had got off to a flying start when she appeared as Hermia in the 1935 Max Reinhardt version of A Midsummer Night's Dream in which, aged 19, she played opposite Mickey Rooney's Puck.

Up until now, as a prisoner of the studio system ("we were like a stock company at Warners; we didn't know any of the stars from the other studios"), De Havilland did more or less as she was told. It was Gone with the Wind that changed everything.

At the Oscars in 1940 the movie swept all before it, winning ten Academy Awards. De Havilland was favourite to win best supporting actress, but had to give way to Hattie McDaniel, playing Scarlett's maidservant, Mammy — the first African-American to win an Oscar.

It did not matter; De Havilland's career was made. Only 12 months later she nearly emulated Joan's achievement when she was nominated for her role in Hold Back the Dawn as a young American woman tricked into marrying a Romanian gigolo. Then, in 1946, she won the first of her two Academy Awards, for her performance in the romantic drama To Each His Own, directed by Mitchell Leisen, in which, daringly for the time, she played an unmarried mother forced to give up her child.

Three years later, after winning for The Heiress — a role eerily reminiscent of Joan's in Suspicion — she had pared her acceptance speech down to two sentences: "Your award for To Each His Own I took as an incentive to venture forward. Thank you for this very generous assurance that I have not entirely failed to do so." Immediately before The Heiress, which was directed by William Wyler, De Havilland took a considerable risk by playing an incarcerated schizophrenic in the Anatole Litvak thriller The Snake Pit.

In their private lives, which were extremely public, female movie stars in the 1930s and 1940s were expected to behave simultaneously like virgins and vamps. De Havilland resolved not to fall into the many traps of Hollywood, and her relationships with men were discriminating — she dated the film star Jimmy Stewart, the director John Huston and (briefly) the eccentric tycoon Howard Hughes.

Although she was a naturalised US citizen and was a strong supporter of Franklin D Roosevelt, for whose re-election as president she campaigned in 1944, De Havilland chose to live in Paris for the last 50 years of her life, becoming very much a francophile while continuing to act in films, both British and American, which interested her, including Libel (1959) with Dirk Bogarde and Hush . . . Hush, Sweet Charlotte (1964), a blood-curdling murder mystery in which she co-starred with Bette Davis.

Always outspoken, De Havilland was one of the few actors in the Hollywood of her time to stand up to the studio system. In 1943, having decided to leave Warner for Paramount in search of more challenging roles, she found herself sued by her former employer to provide it with one more picture, to which it felt legally entitled. De Havilland disagreed. Warner executives argued that she owed them because of a six-month work suspension that they had previously imposed on her while she disputed the appropriateness of the scripts she was being offered.


After a landmark ruling, the young actress — who was only 26 — emerged triumphant, securing what became known as the "De Havilland decision", giving actors greater freedom to decide who they worked for and what roles they would play. By now, at the height of her fame, she was arguably bigger than the studios. "I was told that I would never work again," she recalled years later, "whether I lost or won. When I won, they were impressed and didn't bear a grudge."

Another obstacle overcome in mid-career was her politics, which at one point, in the McCarthy era, was categorised as "swimming-pool pink" — corresponding to the contemporary jibe "champagne socialism". De Havilland, who had championed Harry Truman after the death of Roosevelt, made clear during a secret appearance in front of the House Un-American Activities Committee that she despised Stalinism and held no truck with the Soviet Union. Those listening to her testimony were left in no doubt that she was telling the truth.

Over the years she worked with most of the biggest stars in Hollywood, including Ralph Richardson, Robert Mitchum and Frank Sinatra. She thoroughly enjoyed the company of each of these megastars, but said it was Bette Davis who had taught her the virtue of "absolute dedication".

Olivia Mary de Havilland was born in Tokyo in 1916. Her father, Walter de Havilland, who would later become a patent lawyer, taught English at the Japanese capital's Imperial University. Her mother, Lilian, was an actress and singer who had trained at Rada in London. The two had met while working in New York. On her father's side, Olivia was related to Sir Geoffrey de Havilland, the engineer who designed the Mosquito multi-role combat aircraft.


Three years after Olivia's birth, and 18 months after the arrival of Joan, Lilian de Havilland — described by Joan as "neither warm nor cosy" — left her husband, a self-absorbed man given to sexual infidelity, and moved with the children to California. She had originally intended to return to Britain, but was persuaded that the climate of the Pacific coast would be good for Joan's persistent bronchitis — a condition that had recently deteriorated into pneumonia.


In the event they settled in Saratoga, to the south of San Francisco Bay, where both girls thrived (although Joan returned to Japan for several years to live with her father) and where Lilian met and married George Fontaine, a store manager, from whom Joan would take her stage name. Lilian gave elocution and singing lessons to her two daughters and introduced them to the works of Shakespeare. Olivia also took ballet lessons. Joan remained weaker and was allowed to do less, which fuelled the sibling rivalry.


De Havilland was married twice, first to Marcus Goodrich, a navy veteran, screenwriter and author of the novel Delilah; he was also a one-time Paris buddy of Ernest Hemingway. They had a son, Benjamin. Goodrich was 18 years older than her and had neglected to tell her that he had been married four times previously. Her second husband was Pierre Galante, the editor of Paris Match and the father of her daughter, Gisèle. Both marriages ended in divorce. Like her sister, De Havilland always put her career before her love life, and did not take easily to the constrictions imposed by marriage and motherhood.


In later life she was showered with honours, including a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, the Légion d'honneur and the National Medal of Arts, presented to her by George W Bush, the US president at the time. De Havilland was the last living member of the cast of Gone with the Wind. Within weeks of turning 101, she was appointed DBE, which she described, with typical grace, as "the most gratifying of birthday presents".


Dame Olivia de Havilland, DBE, actress, was born on July 1, 1916. She died on July 26, 2020, aged 104

If the old only could, if the young only knew.

thaiga

thanks for that T.T. - the older we get the more we see - Gone with the wind or Gone by the wayside  ::)

Banning 'Gone With The Wind'

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Joe Ruby, dies at 87 'Scooby Doo' co creator
Joe Ruby, the co-creator of cartoon series of shows including "Scooby-Doo, Where Are You?" died Wednesday. He was 87.

Ruby and Spears wrote the first five episodes of the beloved Saturday morning cartoon series produced by Hanna-Barbera, which debuted on CBS in 1969. The series ran for 25 episodes in 1969-1970 and featured four high school students -- Fred Jones, Velma Dinkley, Daphne Blake and Norville "Shaggy" Rogers, who comprised Mystery Inc. -- along with a Great Dane named Scooby-Doo. The group rode around in a psychedelic, flower power green van, called the "Mystery Machine," and solved mysteries, normally set in creepy venues.  R.I.P.




Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

1970s Diana Rigg BBC PARKINSON
In a BBC interview with Michael Parkinson, Avengers actor Diana Rigg talks about staying grounded despite her success.
Dame Diana Rigg, who has died at the age of 82 after a long successful career on stage and in film, rose to fame in the 1960s as Emma Peel in The Avengers alongside Patrick Macnee.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

England 1966 World Cup-winner dies | Nobby Stiles Tribute | ENGLAND football legend
ENGLAND football legend Nobby Stiles has died aged 78.

The ex-Manchester United midfielder, famous for his missing teeth and dancing on the Wembley turf in '66, has passed away after a long illness, his family said today.

Stiles had been battling Alzheimer's and vascular dementia for 18 years and had been diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2012.
1966 hat-trick hero Sir Geoff Hurst called Stiles the "heart and soul" of that famous England team. R.I.P.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Well 2020 is not a good year all round as we loose another great, 90 years old Sean Connery R.I.P.

Sean Connery: James Bond actor dies aged 90
The Scottish actor was best known for his portrayal of James Bond, being the first to bring the role to the big screen and appearing in seven of the spy thrillers. Sir Sean died peacefully in his sleep in the Bahamas, having been "unwell for some time", his son said.
bbc.com

Sean Connery - What's My Line

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Remembering Diego Maradona: football legend dies aged 60
regarded as one of the greatest football players of all time, has died at the age of 60. Maradona was a uniquely gifted player with a bewitching style that was all his own. He rose from the streets of Buenos Aires to reach the pinnacle of his sport

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

May the force be with you

From theguardian.com Prowse was a former bodybuilder who had a series of roles as monsters and villains before being invited by George Lucas to audition for the roles of Vader and Chewbacca. He chose Vader and when asked why, replied: "Everyone remembers the villain."

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Dec 10, 2020
Dame Barbara Windsor, best known for her roles in EastEnders and the Carry On films, has died aged 83, her husband Scott Mitchell has said.  Mitchell said in a statement: "It is with deep sadness that I can confirm that my darling wife Barbara passed away at 8.35pm on Thursday 10 December at a London care home. R.I.P.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

thaiga

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Quick Reply

Note: this post will not display until it has been approved by a moderator.

Name:
Email:
Verification:
Please leave this box empty:
Type the letters shown in the picture
Listen to the letters / Request another image

Type the letters shown in the picture:
What makes three plus two?:
How do people in Korat call the Thao Suranaree Monument in the center of town? (Mundo/Yamo/Supa/Mall):
Shortcuts: ALT+S post or ALT+P preview