Author Topic: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod  (Read 186 times)

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Offline thaiga

Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« on: October 06, 2018, 01:08:44 PM »
Doors open to London's latest vegan venture: fish and chips



Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online KiwiCanadian

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #1 on: October 06, 2018, 05:41:17 PM »
the BIG question for me is what are the "Fish" made from? no mention in the video.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #2 on: October 06, 2018, 05:52:02 PM »
hi kc 

Daniel Sutton uses banana blossom, seaweed and samphire to create the vegan fish at his new store in Hackney, east London which is then battered and fried in vegetable oil. The finished product, looks like a traditional fillet of fish although it has a different taste and texture. Mr Sutton began experimenting with vegan fish at one of his other chip shops before deciding to open his Hackney operation. He said: ''We thought we'd produce something vegan and see how it goes. It went really well, so we introduced a full menu.'   from the d.m below the vid

more in detail  reuters.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online KiwiCanadian

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #3 on: October 06, 2018, 06:06:34 PM »
I might have to try it in a couple of weeks, as we will be on our way back to LOS via Londinium.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #4 on: October 06, 2018, 06:39:28 PM »
there proving popular in the uk or are people looking for something different

10 of the best vegan fish and chip shops in the UK

We all get that craving for good old fish and chips from time to time! Thankfully, vegan ‘fish’ and chip shops are popping up all over the place, and many takeaways are adding vegan options to their menus. Here are 10 of the best vegan fish and chip shops from around the UK.

               

veganfoodandliving.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online KiwiCanadian

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #5 on: October 06, 2018, 06:49:07 PM »
Here is another question that is health related.
What is the frying oil used in the deep friers?
Some have a lot of trans fats that are being targeted as not fit for human consumption now.

Mind you used frying oil makes good Bio Diesel for your wheels, LOL

KC
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #6 on: October 07, 2018, 04:36:17 PM »
I wonder just how many people whilst waiting in the queue with their mouth watering with the aroma of fish n chips in the air, actualy think about the oil it is being cooked in.

What Is The Healthiest Oil For Deep Frying? The Crispy Truth

Deep-fried foods have always been popular.

They are a part of many traditional cuisines, and are also a staple of the fast-food industry.

Unfortunately, deep frying is not exactly the healthiest cooking method, particularly when done on an industrial scale.

But deep frying at home certainly does not have to be unhealthy.

It largely comes down to the type of oil you use, and how you use it.

How Does Deep Frying Work?

Deep frying involves submerging a food in hot oil.

The ideal temperature is around 350–375°F (176–190°C).

When a food is submerged in oil of this temperature, its surface cooks almost instantly and forms a type of "seal" that the oil cannot penetrate.

At the same time, the moisture inside the food turns into steam, cooking the food from the inside. The steam also helps to keep the oil out of the food.

If the temperature is too low, the oil will seep into the food, making it greasy and sickening. If the temperature is too high, it can dry out the food and oxidize the oil.

The Stability of Cooking Oils Is a Key Factor

Some oils can withstand much higher temperatures than others.

We want to choose oils that have a high smoke point, and we also want oils that are stable and don't react with oxygen when heated.

The more saturated the fats in an oil are, the more stable they are when heated.

For this reason, oils that are mostly saturated and monounsaturated are best, but we want to avoid cooking oils that contain large amounts of polyunsaturated fats (1).

Polyunsaturated fats contain two (or more) double bonds in their chemical structure. These double bonds tend to react with oxygen and form harmful compounds when exposed to high heat.

Taste obviously matters as well. When deep frying, oils that have a "neutral" flavor are generally preferred.

The Winner: Coconut Oil Is The Healthiest Oil For Deep Frying

Coconut oil is your best choice overall.

Studies have shown that even after 8 hours of continuous deep frying at 365°F (180°C), its quality does not deteriorate (2).

Over 90% of the fatty acids in coconut oil are saturated, which makes it very resistant to heat.

Saturated fats used to be considered unhealthy, but new studies show that they are a completely harmless source of energy for humans (3, 4).

Additionally, coconut oil has numerous health benefits. For example, it can help kill harmful bacteria and viruses, and may even help you lose belly fat (5, 6).

Keep in mind that some varieties can leave a coconut flavor or smell, so I recommend that you try a few different brands until you find one that is suitable.

Several Other Good Choices and what Should Not Be Used for Deep Frying healthline.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: Traditions - you can't beat a bit of cod
« Reply #7 on: October 07, 2018, 04:47:56 PM »
The thing to avoid is trans fats. You will only get endless complaints from LGTBQWTF complaining that transgendered people are wrongly accused of being gravitationally challenged.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 
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