Author Topic: The Brexit  (Read 34454 times)

Offline thaiga

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Re: The Brexit - Brexit bribe? $2.1 billion fund for Brexit-backing towns
« Reply #150 on: March 04, 2019, 09:35:12 PM »
Brexit bribe? UK PM Theresa May unveils $2.1 billion fund for Brexit-backing towns

The opposition Labour Party's finance spokesman, John McDonnell, said the fund was "Brexit bribery".

British Prime Minister Theresa May will on Monday set out plans for a 1.6 billion pound ($2.11 billion) fund to help to boost economic growth in Brexit-supporting communities with ministers denying it was a bribe to win support for her EU exit deal.

The "Stronger Towns Fund", details of which appeared in newspapers last month, is seen by many as part of May's efforts to win support for her Brexit deal from opposition Labour lawmakers who represent areas, particularly in northern England that voted strongly in favour of leaving the European Union.

Britain is due to leave the bloc at the end of the month and May, whose exit deal with Brussels was rejected by a large majority of lawmakers in January, has promised parliament will get to vote on a revised deal by March 12.

The government said the fund would be targeted at places that had not shared fairly in the country's prosperity and would be used to create new jobs, help to train people and boost economic activity.

"Communities across the country voted for Brexit as an expression of their desire to see change; that must be a change for the better, with more opportunity and greater control," May said in a statement.

"These towns have a glorious heritage, huge potential and, with the right help, a bright future ahead of them."

The opposition Labour Party's finance spokesman, John McDonnell, said the fund was "Brexit bribery".

"This towns fund smacks of desperation from a government reduced to bribing Members of Parliament to vote for their damaging flagship Brexit legislation," he said in a statement.

However, Communities Secretary James Brokenshire said the money was not linked to support for the withdrawal agreement.

"This is funding is there regardless of the outcome," he told BBC radio when asked if the money was a bribe. Obviously we want to see a deal happening. But no, there is no conditionality in that sense."

One billion pounds has already been allocated, with more than half going to towns across the north of England. A further 600 million pounds will be available for communities around the country to bid for, the government said.

Critics said that the fund, when divided between a large of areas, would not provide individual towns with that much money, nor make up for what they had lost as a result of government cuts in recent years.

Brokenshire did not say how many towns would benefit but said the money could be "transformative".

"It can make that difference on creating the jobs, actually putting the skills in place and changing people's lives in a modern positive economy," he said.

REUTERS economictimes.indiatimes.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline Roger

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #151 on: March 06, 2019, 08:53:04 PM »
Fresh backstop talks in Brussels end with no breakthrough
European Commission: No solution identified at this point
Downing Street: Talks with EU have been 'difficult'
Woody Johnson: Scare stories about US food created by EU
Former MI6 head says no deal Brexit is better than May's deal
Opinion: UK defeated EU - it should be demanding surrender terms
Opinion: PM must decide if she's serious about no-deal Brexit
Philip Johnston: The Prime Minister's Brexit gamble has backfired

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/politics/2019/03/06/brexit-latest-news-theresa-may-faces-commons-grilling-talks/

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #152 on: March 07, 2019, 07:14:25 AM »
The great thing about all this Brexit uncertainty is that it has gummed up the workings of Government for two years.  When governments get elected they set out to impress the electorate by creating as many new laws as possible despite the fact that there are already far too many laws which are never correctly applied. So the Brexit hiatus has given us a respite from unnecessary lawmaking.
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Offline Roger

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #153 on: March 07, 2019, 08:23:46 AM »
Heard a strong assertion on BBC that Mrs May's deal WILL go down by 100 votes next Tuesday.

Alternative paths left are :-
1. No deal Brexit   ;D   ;D   ;D
2. Extension of Article 50 - that'd be OK and it would have to be limited to a few months with the European elections coming . . . however, Macron and others say extension is only possible IF something fundamental changes in the UK - such as a General Election, 2nd Referendum or a new Tory Leader  8)
3. 2nd Referendum - IMO this will only happen when ALL other alternatives are exhausted.
4. Norway Plus deal - as being discussed by Tory factions with Corbyn yesterday. As it would mean staying in the 'Customs Union' AND the 'Single Market', I don't see that getting through Parliament.
5. Remain  >:(   >:(   >:(   >:(

God only knows !

If it's 'no deal', this would be a strong first step in the UK rebirth, ''The UK government may cut trade tariffs on between 80% and 90% of goods in the event of a no-deal Brexit''. Brilliant.

Come on Jacob the Mogg ! Boris has had a haircut - anything could happen.

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #154 on: March 07, 2019, 09:21:55 AM »
Roger, this is the only acceptable one from your list and it could have been done 2 years ago:-
1. No deal Brexit
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #155 on: March 07, 2019, 10:51:15 AM »
Maybe some Brits will find this "acceptable" now, but how will any trade partners in Europe or anywhere else on the planet think of the UK? Will they find the UK a reliable trade partner and risk business or investments? Will they find those politicians "acceptable" in the sense of trustworthy? It's highly questionable! Did Brit politicians at any given time think of the psychological impacts of their move on other countries' politics and trade relations? ;)

Be realistic: the days of THE BRITISH EMPIRE are over; it's just a country isolating itself more and more.

Offline Roger

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #156 on: March 07, 2019, 01:29:39 PM »
Hi JF. I'll leave TT to answer your reponse but re. EMPIRE - yep the British Empire is long gone and 3 cheers for that  ;)  But if you think OUT of the EU means more isolation, hopefully not !

There's a whole World outside the EU you know  8)  BFN

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #157 on: March 07, 2019, 02:23:15 PM »
Yes, the British Empire started to crumble rapidly after the First World War.  I think in one of my previous posts I even suggested that we might sell of Gibraltar if that were to ease any Spanish difficulties.  All Empires eventually come to an end:- Roman Empire,  Ottoman Empire, British Empire,  Russian Empire (USSR).  Next to fall will be the EU Empire (European Union of Socialist States)
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #158 on: March 07, 2019, 03:19:11 PM »
The "key" to the world nowadays belongs to the conglomerate "Big Money", of which the UK held a considerable share in London. But the caretakers of "Big Money" (mainly banks) have a problem with pulling the strings from London, if the UK doesn't have good connections to the rest of the world anymore. A No-Deal Brexit would cut a lot of those strings. In fear of that quite a considerable numbers of banks have moved their operation centers to cities on the mainland Europe already. Just look at Frankfurt. My condo there about doubled in value within the last five years. Frankfurt used to be a nice city, but now it seems to become more hectic than ever; first it was the crumbling of the East Block 30 years ago, now it is the run of "Big Money" from "brexiting" Britain, going steep up since the Brexit referendum. 

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #159 on: March 07, 2019, 03:35:00 PM »
Johnnie, I am pleased to hear that you have made good gains on your condo in Frankfurt.  I think you should show appreciation to staunch Brexiteers like Roger and myself by standing us a round of drinks.  But somewhere decent, not in the G&D.
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #160 on: March 07, 2019, 04:19:31 PM »
I haven't sold it yet, only noticed the rise in value from the last tax bill. The taxman asks for annual tax payments on the value estimated by himself every 5 years. No problem so far, as my tenant has to pay that tax for me as part of his utilities bill.

If you buy it from me at the value estimated by the taxman or find a buyer for that price, I will gladly pay a few pints to help you get over these Brexit woes. ;D

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #161 on: March 07, 2019, 05:33:09 PM »
Quote
The taxman asks for annual tax payments on the value estimated by himself every 5 years.

That does not sound good. I imagine there is no appeal against the tax man’s valuation?  This could only happen in the EU.
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #162 on: March 07, 2019, 05:50:41 PM »
That does not sound good. I imagine there is no appeal against the tax man’s valuation?  This could only happen in the EU.

Of course there is, if you want to invest the postage for a few pennies difference in tax your tenant has to pay. The taxation of estate property in Germany is done by the cities and towns according to their revenue statutes; and it is used to build and maintain roads etc. The nicer and better developed the town, the higher is the value of houses. Taxation can be different again in the next town with potholed streets etc. just 1 km away, so it can't be blamed on the EU.

BTW the same thing happens in the USA as well, only there the tax on your house is not a few Euros, it's a couple of thousand dollars for a ridiculous shack, if that gains value; there it's estimated and collected by the state to my knowledge.  8)

May I imagine, that in the UK one does not need to pay taxes, but gets money from the taxman in addition to your income, holdings and possessions? Of course that were a decent thing? ;D

Offline Fluffy

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #163 on: March 07, 2019, 07:09:22 PM »
Compliments, guys, I like to read your bantering about this topic. It's unlike most of other discussions about the Brexit from different viewpoints, it's full of knowledge and not so hard-headed: enjoyable! Keep on like that! :)

My opinion? I keep hoping that it won't turn out too bad, though it will take it's toll.

Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #164 on: March 07, 2019, 07:25:56 PM »
Hi Fluffy, thanks for the praises! And welcome to the forum!

 :cheers

Johnnie F.

Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #165 on: March 08, 2019, 09:54:19 AM »
Foreignpolicy.com has its view on something really serious in case of a No-Deal Brexit: a toilet paper shortage! Ok, the Korat expat returning home to the UK says: "Fine with me, I got used to those bum guns they use in Thailand!" But those who have seen a little more of Thailand will know, not everywhere there is a bum gun installed or toilet paper provided; at some places there is just a Thai toilet with a bucket of water for flushing. A shortage of toilet paper, especially since it has the reputation of being heavy duty quality like Reynolds Wrap, might lead to serious problems in the UK; I don't even dare to picture any of those...  :fart ;D

Or it's back to buying The Sun and Daily Mail as paper again to read and use in the loo... :evilgrin

Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #166 on: March 08, 2019, 12:13:49 PM »
Topic: The Brexit  (Read 27861 times)

Wow, I would never have thought, that this topic would get as many views with just 166 posts by only a hand full of posters. That's a post to page views ratio of 1:167.

Definitely must have something to do with what Fluffy remarked:

It's unlike most of other discussions about the Brexit from different viewpoints, it's full of knowledge and not so hard-headed: enjoyable! Keep on like that! :)

On a parallel forum 588 posts to this topic got only 15,006 views! That's 1:26.

But of course, when somebody writes "Italy has already said that in the event of a no-deal, it will seek it's own agreement with the UK", it's plain to see that there isn't any understanding of the EU behind that, because member states just cannot make any own deals with third countries (non-members), that's what they joined the EU for: to get the most by united action.

P.S. Actually the high post to page views ratio is not so surprising, when you look at the forum stats: 30,569,255 page views on 45,730 posts. that makes a ratio of 1:668.  :)

Offline Roger

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #167 on: March 08, 2019, 02:18:22 PM »
I thought you would enjoy this JF . . . .

Euro plunges to 21-month low after gloomy ECB unveils new stimulus and slashes growth forecasts

    ''European Central Bank unveils new stimulus to prop up economy
    Banks will be offered more cheap loans to boost growth
    Stocks knocked by ECB slashing growth forecasts
    ECB warns interest rates will remain ultra-low until at least end of 2019
    Britain will prosper with a 'hard but smart' Brexit say German economists
    Businesses on edge as 'secretive' ministers plot drastic action on tariffs
''.

''Embracing free trade would limit the damage caused by a "no deal" Brexit, give a bounty of cheaper imports to consumers and strengthen Britain’s hand in EU negotiations, according to top German economists. Slashing all import tariffs after Brexit would cut costs for households and businesses, giving the economy a boost, the Ifo Institute said in a new report, calling this model a “hard but smart” Brexit.

At the same time it would rebalance the power around the negotiating table, which is currently based on a "no deal" Brexit harming the UK because it would involve Britain imposing WTO taxes on its own consumers
.''

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2019/03/07/markets-latest-news-pound-euro-ftse-100-ecb-set-signal-fresh/

and https://www.bangkokpost.com/business/news/1640852/draghi-slashes-ecb-outlook-as-officials-inject-more-stimulus?

Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #168 on: March 08, 2019, 02:57:14 PM »
I wonder, how you always find articles as badly researched, Roger!  ;)

No, the Euro is still considerably over the low of last months. 1 minute ago it was 35.67506 to the THB, while about a month ago it had plunged below 35 even. And the GBP is down to 41.64283 to the baht as well. China's problems keep all in the same boat. Only Trump still expects the USA to benefit from his trade war.

But the ultra-cheap credit policy is fact. My bank in Germany just yesterday offered me a loan at an effective interest rate of 2.01 %. It just doesn't mean that the UK might be better off without a deal. That's not what has been said. The talk was about the uncertainty. As long as May keeps traveling to Brussels in hope of any further concessions there is uncertainty. Once she gives up her hopes businesses, both in the UK and the EU, can make decisions based upon what they see coming instead of unreliable politicians' promises, and we know more. Until then everything is pure speculation, gambling, the betting Brits love so much.

Quote
...strengthen Britain’s hand in EU negotiations

Britain needs to "strengthen its hand in EU negotiations" can only be interpreted as not having a strong hand now. :-[

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #169 on: March 09, 2019, 10:19:55 AM »
Johnnie, I have decided on the venue for the drinks session:- HOBS bar at IconSiam.  The Paulaner Weissbier is a mere 330 Baht (€9.25) per 500ml.
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #170 on: March 09, 2019, 11:07:50 AM »
Looks like you have a friend who wants to migrate from London to Frankfurt going after his bank job. He can contact me about buying my apartment in Dreieich, a very well connected idyllic town a couple of km south of the city, not far from the airport. 58 sqm, two rooms, kitchen, big hall, bathroom, balcony, cellar, parking space, elevator, playground etc. for about €210,000 (185,000 GBP) in that town is a bargain. With all costs of the transfer and taxes it will be around €240,000 ( 206,000 GBP). Almost everybody advises me not to sell now, as prices are expected to jump higher still, when there is going to  be a no-deal Brexit.

You can see, that the average price per sqm is not only higher than the average in the state of Hessen, but also a lot higher than the average price in whole Germany. I don't think I want to live there again: boring neighbors of only bank employees running from the Brexit living around Frankfurt now!

€9,25 for a bottle Paulaner cannot be deemed very expensive anymore. Gladly cover that, if your friend buys that apartment from me. :)


Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #171 on: March 09, 2019, 12:37:42 PM »
Johnnie, my client has instructed me to begin negotiations with you for the purchase of the condo.  My client is an extremely wealthy banker and already owns a large estate just outside Frankfurt. He is now looking to acquire a number of condos for his domestic staff:- drivers, gardeners etc.  Can we begin negotiations this coming Monday at HOBS bar? My client can be an extremely difficult person and so negotiations are expected to take some time, maybe years.  All Paulaner consumed during the negotiation period is to be to the account of Mr. Johnnie.
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #172 on: March 09, 2019, 12:48:00 PM »
Looks like your client has to find another place for the negotiations, as I am not inclined to come to a HOBS bar further than walking distance from my house. Best preparation would be to open a HOBS bar in this village.  Of course I reserve the right to make another decision upon completion, if it doesn't suit my taste.

And of course all the Paulaner consumed during the negotiations must be included in the final price for the condo. But I wonder, whether three people can drink fast enough for the bill to keep pace with the rising estate prices around Frankfurt due to bankers running from the Brexit. ;)

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #173 on: March 10, 2019, 12:06:55 AM »
Article in the Guardian about a Brexit comedy evening: Never Mind the Brexit: https://www.theguardian.com/stage/2019/mar/08/never-mind-the-backstop-camden-comedy-club-brexit-standups
Here is one of the comments btl:-

An Englishman, a Frenchman, a Spaniard, and a German start to argue about whose native language is the most beautiful.

The Englishman begins. "England is the land of Shakespeare and literature, and our language is filled with beautiful poetry. Take the word 'butterfly'. It conveys such a beautiful image of that creature smoothly flying through the air like butter."


The Frenchman responds. "Nothing in English can compare to the natural beauty of the French language. Bah, 'butter fly'. That can not even begin to compare the angelic beauty of our word, 'papillon'".


The Spaniard now pipes in. "I understand the pride that both of you feel about your languages, but seriously, our word is by far the most word: 'mariposa'".


All turn to the German who is just sitting there, sulking. Finally, he bursts out with, "So ... what's wrong with 'Schmetterling', anyway?"
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Offline thaiga

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #174 on: March 11, 2019, 01:41:50 PM »
Will anybody still be interested in moving back to what is going to remain of the UK, if tomorrow the outcome will be a "no-deal Brexit" and more bankers and businesses run to the mainland Europe? Except Roger of course! ;)
More than 275 financial firms are moving a combined $1.2 trillion in assets and funds and thousands of staff from Britain to the European Union in readiness for Brexit at a cost of up to $4 billion, a report from a think tank said on Monday. finance.yahoo.com
pic@ Reuters

Split and moved here from Thread My troubled email by admin.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #175 on: March 12, 2019, 08:07:16 AM »
Before today's vote:

German newspapers report there were a breakthrough in the negotiations regarding the backstop, but don't explicitly explain details. The Guardian explains:

Here’s a little more detail on what the cabinet secretary, David Lidington, has told MPs about the negotiations in Strasbourg:

  • We will be laying two new documents in the House: A joint, legally binding instrument on the withdrawal agreement and protocol on Northern Ireland; and a joint statement to supplement the political declaration.

    The first provides confirmation that the EU cannot try to trap the UK in the backstop indefinitely and that doing so would be an explicit breach of the legally-binding commitments that both sides have agreed.

    If – contrary to all expectations – the EU were to act with that intention, the UK could use this acceptance of what could constitute an explicit breach as the basis for a formal dispute, through independent arbitration, that such a breach had occurred – ultimately suspending the protocol if thew EU continued to breach its obligations.

    On top of this, the joint instrument also reflect the United Kingdom’s and European Union’s commitment to work to replace the backstop with alternative arrangements by December 2020, setting out explicitly that these arrangements do not need to replicate the provisions of the backstop in any respect.

Reactions seem to be mixed.

Offline thaiga

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Re: The Brexit - Sterling surges as May secures Brexit
« Reply #176 on: March 12, 2019, 02:14:29 PM »
Sterling surges as May secures Brexit assurances, yen dips

Sterling rose sharply on Tuesday as speculation swirled that British Prime Minister Theresa May might be closer to securing approval for her Brexit deal.

The pound extended earlier gains as May won legally binding Brexit assurances from the European Union, in a last ditch attempt to sway rebellious British lawmakers who have threatened to vote down her divorce deal in a parliamentary vote on Tuesday.

Sterling, jumped as high as $1.3290 as some investors bolstered bet the prime minister could secure a divorce deal before Britain’s scheduled March 29 departure from the EU.

The pound was last trading 0.6 percent higher on the day at $1.3223, having been as low as $1.2945 at one stage on Monday.

The euro slid to its lowest on the pound since mid-2017 at 84.71 pence. It was last quoted down about 0.4 percent on the day at 85.15 pence.

At a joint news conference with European Commission head Jean-Claude Juncker late on Monday, May announced three documents aimed at addressing the most contentious part of the exit deal she agreed in November – the Irish backstop.

“Seeing them together in the same screen, is a positive – that there is some hand holding there and working together to move forward,” said Bart Wakabayashi, Tokyo branch manager at State Street Bank.

The Irish backstop is an insurance policy aimed at avoiding controls on the sensitive border between the British province of Northern Ireland and EU member Ireland.

“If they can break (the backstop) down to a level where there can be some negotiation or at least compromise on both sides, there definitely does seem (to be) light at the end of the tunnel,” added Wakabayashi.

If May loses the vote on Tuesday, she has said lawmakers will get a vote on Wednesday on whether to leave without a deal and, if they reject that, then a vote on whether to ask for a limited delay to Brexit.

Most other currencies stayed within familiar trading ranges before U.S. February inflation figures expected later on Tuesday.

The dollar index, which measures the greenback against a basket of six rivals, fell almost 0.2 percent to 97.063 on a modest improvement in investors’ risk appetite.

Against the Japanese yen, a safe-haven currency often bought in times of rising volatility, the dollar was 0.2 percent higher at 111.43 yen.

Data on Monday showed U.S. retail sales rose modestly in January, lifted by an increase in purchases of building materials and discretionary spending, but a drop in December was even larger than initially thought.

The euro found support against the dollar on the Brexit news and the improvement in risk appetite. The single currency was last up about 0.15 percent at $1.1259.

 (Reuters)  magafirstnews.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #177 on: March 12, 2019, 04:27:09 PM »
And now there is even a King's College Frankfurt, so the kids don't have to learn German to go to school or attend that (American) FIS Frankfurt International School or ISF International School Frankfurt  Rhein–Main, or the Metropolitan School Frankfurt etc., when the banking father moves after his job to Frankfurt:

https://kcfrankfurt.de/the-school/kings-college-frankfurt/

One's gotta be really rich to send a kid there! :spin

International Schools are booming in Frankfurt just like the banks! That fairly new King's College is not on the map, yet, but must be near main / taunus international school in the upper part. And Dreieich is in the lower part near Strothoff International School Rhein Main.

Online Taman Tun

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #178 on: March 13, 2019, 07:18:00 AM »
This extracted from order-order.com...a little story about the Attorney General

The PM might feel that she took a bit of a spanking from the Attorney General this morning. Which reminds Guido of an amusing anecdote. Back in 2000 defending Robin Peverett, (66), the former headmaster of the elite Dulwich College, his barrister Geoffrey Cox said “What’s a little buttock fondling after all? It was all such a long time ago”.

“This sort of thing happened all the time in my school. It was a different era when headmasters considered themselves Gods, like barristers,” he added, dismissing a reporter who posed questions afterwards as someone who “went to a little comp somewhere.” Old school Tory…
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Offline Johnnie F.

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Re: The Brexit
« Reply #179 on: March 14, 2019, 12:43:54 PM »
Parliament voted against a no-deal Brexit, that's why PM May wants parliament to vote a third time on her deal. She had two shots already, so why not give the public a second shot referendum on the Brexit?

 



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