Author Topic: The Brexit  (Read 14767 times)

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Offline Aussie

Johnnie F. If Northern Ireland, Gibraltar and Scotland do not want to be part of the UK it would be wise to let them go and let them choose their own future destiny.  It is rather that simple. Why struggle with an Albatross tied to one’s neck when they want to be free and not subject to domination by England? It wasn't too long ago, 18 September 2014 when Scotland was given a referendum “Should Scotland be an independent country”? The "No" side won, with 2,001,926 (55.3%) voting against independence and 1,617,989 (44.7%) voting in favour. The turnout of 84.6% was the highest recorded for an election or referendum in the United Kingdom since the introduction of universal suffrage.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes
 

Offline Johnnie F.


Johnnie F. If those areas do not want to be part of the UK  it would be wise to let them go and let them choose their own future destiny.  It is rather that simple. Why struggle with an Albatross tied to ones neck when they want to be free and not subject to domination by others?
Regards

We finally agree on something. Now we have to wait! Do you really think any conservative Brit will allow any part of "Great" Britain to "disintegrate" and choose its own future and freedom in today's world?  ;)


It wasn't too long ago, 18 September 2014 when Scotland was given a referendum “Should Scotland be an independent country”? The "No" side won, with 2,001,926 (55.3%) voting against independence and 1,617,989 (44.7%) voting in favour. The turnout of 84.6% was the highest recorded for an election or referendum in the United Kingdom since the introduction of universal suffrage.
Regards

You can't imagine things to be different now, after a BREXIT, do you? ;)
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

make England great again.

I agree, it badly needs that now. But with a 52/48 split it will most likely drift the opposite direction.  8)

What Britain needs most now, is unification, not one half suppressing the other half, with only a hand full deciding who suppresses and who gets suppressed. It needs to be a united kingdom, not just using that as name!

Quote
England has a wonderful and prosperous future.

Unless British people and British politicians do run it down even further with more "bar-room politics" and boulevard media manipulation.

Quote
God bless the true Brits.
As a German, what is your agenda in promoting the EU?
Regards

Dear Aussie,

you might not believe how often I heard Brits in Korat "play the nationalist card"! They need help as much as Germans "playing the nationalist card". Because all of those have not understood, that in today's world not only Big Money and Big Business think and act global; people gotta adjust to that, too, especially mentally, if they want to be able to keep their stand against those and not become poorer again by their own "turning back the clock" without proper regard to the times having changed not only in one perspective.

You can't understand, why I, as a German, do not think of Germany and Europe in the first place, but of people and the world?

Now try to understand, why a German does invest the effort and money to run a forum in English for Korat! Could it be that there is something else than nationalism? ;)

BTW, you sound like a deceased member of this forum, when he first met me ten years ago on the old Koratfarang forum. When I was attacked there by some Brits and Aussies with nationalism, he - then still thinking nationalistic himself - aggressively advised me to open my own forum instead of using "theirs". I followed his advice, first with Korat-Info and then this here. He then joined both, having understood, that here in Korat, we cannot live like being in our hometown back in Britain or elsewhere, but also need to move here mentally, broaden our perspectives. He became a very good friend.  ;)
RIP SAF (sicho)
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: After the BREXIT vote - the economy reacting
« Reply #33 on: June 25, 2016, 12:18:09 PM »
Just an example:

Quote
Dear Customer,
Due to recent fluctuations in currency values and exchange rates we have reviewed our pricing across all currencies and wish to inform you we will be making some changes to our pricing.
Where possible we have aimed to bring the benefit of these currency value changes to our customers (for example .co.uk domains will now be priced at 6.51 USD {previously 7.10 USD}) but there will be some domains which are now more expensive, particularly in the GBP and EUR currencies.
A full list of the new pricing is attached to this email.
As these market fluctuations are ongoing and unpredictable, we may be forced to make further changes at short notice in the coming weeks. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we attempt to limit the impact of these external forces.
Thank you very much for you continued business, we hope that the changes are beneficial to your personal requirements.
Yours truly,
The Internet.bs team

That's what our domain host wrote to me yesterday, announcing, that the domain koratfart.com will cost more in future, if paid in GBP or EUR.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: After the BREXIT vote - the economy reacting
« Reply #34 on: June 25, 2016, 01:09:15 PM »
London, 24 June 2016 -- Moody's Investors Service has today changed the outlook on the UK's long term issuer and debt ratings to negative from stable. Both ratings are affirmed at Aa1.

Read here why.

And how do EU politicians react:
"The EU’s top leaders have said they expect the UK to act on its momentous vote to leave the union “as soon as possible, however painful that process may be” and that there will be “no renegotiation”.

The presidents of the European council, commission and parliament – Donald Tusk, Jean-Claude Juncker and Martin Schulz respectively – and Mark Rutte, the prime minister of the Netherlands which holds the EU’s rotating presidency, said any delay to Britain’s exit would “unnecessarily prolong uncertainty”. (Guardian)
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

No Brexiteer

  • Guest
The pints did it!

Restrict pubs' opening times and sales of alcohol to both young and old. :-[
 

Offline Johnnie F.

They seem to have fixed the petitions page. By now:

EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum

734,792 signatures, with a rapidly rising number.

Very interesting is this map, where you can check from which constituency already how many people have voted. The darker red the more votes.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Another petition on change.org

Declare London independent from the UK and apply to join the EU. is at

109,767 votes now.

Now what will Britain do without its capital? Be a "decapitated" country? Or have its capital in the EU only, be governed "from the EU"? ;)

I'm confident that the British citizens will find a way out of the dilemma the populist Boris Johnson has got them into.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Online Taman Tun

Things have not gone quite according to plan for Bo Jo.  He was hoping for a narrow Remain victory which would enable him to take over from Cameron after a decent interval.  Instead he is now faced with having to deal with unraveling from the EU starting from his very first day on the job.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 
The following users thanked this post: Johnnie F.

Offline Johnnie F.

Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

The petition EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum

already passed the million mark and stands at 1,015,700 signatures right now. People do understand the necessity of acting fast to minimize the damage done by the referendum.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Online Taman Tun

It is a well known EU tactic.  If you ask a question and do not get the answer you want then you ask the question again.  The people have spoken.. Just get over it.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline Johnnie F.

It is a well known EU tactic.

It's a British petition; only Brits can vote. And its strings are not pulled by the EU. The EU made things already very clear: Get out fast, to end uncertainties. The Brit government needs to submit its formal resignation. But there seems to be a huge number of British voters who feel cheated and want to reconsider. That is possible until the formal resignation has been submitted. But the EU must push for doing that soon, if at all, so the world can go on with its business as usual.

The vote count on that petition is accelerating very fast: 1,085,516 signatures
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Offline Aussie

The petition EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum [nofollow]

already passed the million mark and stands at 1,015,700 signatures right now. People do understand the necessity of acting fast to minimize the damage done by the referendum.

Johnnie F. - You keep pushing the line of lets return to the EU and minimise the damage.  What a load of .  The damage the EU has caused for the real Brits of the UK for the last 43 years is on record.  I do not understand why you are so elated that people are signing a petition to reverse the outcome of the referendum.  Please come clean with your reasoning.  With respect, I am suspicious of your motives.  Please prove me wrong.
I'm 100 % behind Taman Tun when I say get over it.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Johnnie F. - You keep pushing the line of lets return to the EU and minimise the damage.  What a load of .  The damage the EU has caused for the real Brits of the UK for the last 43 years is on record.  I do not understand why you are so elated that people are signing a petition to reverse the outcome of the referendum.  Please come clean with your reasoning.  With respect, I am suspicious of your motives.  Please prove me wrong.
I'm 100 % behind Taman Tun when I say get over it.
Regards


The EU will be getting over it easily. But why do you project my impartial reporting of what British people are doing right now as "personal interest"?  ;)

Does it hurt you personally? If you don't like it, don't read it, don't answer to it, don't "challenge" it!  :-[
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Aussie

Johnnie F. - Why do you continually push the line of lets return to the EU and minimise the damage?  What damage are you talking about? Why aren't you also presenting  the line that Britain is better off without the Europhiles and the disasters Brussels has caused.  If you want  a balanced reaction on this forum present a balanced view.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes
 

Offline Johnnie F.

My views are balanced. Are yours?  ;)
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

No Brexiteer

  • Guest
Ahh forgive him, JF, it is hot in Australia. Wonder why the chap so aggressively takes side with one side of divided Britain, trying to keep you from reporting about British efforts to redo a mistake? Why should they be hidden? But already these efforts do show the world that Britain isn't so unreliable to let a mistake just sit.

Cheers

No Brexiteer
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Things have not gone quite according to plan for Bo Jo.  He was hoping for a narrow Remain victory which would enable him to take over from Cameron after a decent interval.  Instead he is now faced with having to deal with unraveling from the EU starting from his very first day on the job.

That's exactly the point: an ambitious politician for personal gain led people in populist manner to a disaster he won't be able to help them out anymore. What are the people doing about it, once they have realized what went wrong? Watching that to unfold is very interesting for me. It has nothing to do with other "motives".
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

I'm in the just get over it camp and make the best of what you can - if there is any british spirit left in der country man. But .....

I wonder if the people who voted knew what they were voting for. The expats on a pension living in an EU country, things could go tits up so easily, lets hope it don't.

Those who supported the referendum are already voicing their regret, saying they didn’t think their vote would matter.
The regret is hitting in now.

A BBC interview with a man who voted in favor of the successful Brexit measure to have the U.K. leave the European Union has gone viral after he stated that he didn’t think his vote “was going to matter” and that he is “worried” about its ramifications.

Reaction of Man Who Voted for Brexit Goes Viral: ‘I’m a Bit Shocked’
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Following the EU referendum results,  "What is the EU?" and "Who will replace David Cameron?" were top searched questions in the UK.

As the pound fell after the EU referendum results, search interest in "pound to euro" and "pound to dollar" spiked.

The UK is not the only country searching for the EU referendum. Top questions from across the EU include "What is 'Brexit'?" and "Why does the UK want to leave the EU?"

Google trends

The petition for a new vote is at 1,803,987 signatures.

And young people, who feel cheated by the "old gits politics", protest in London:

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Offline Johnnie F.

Jonathan Hill (The Lord Hill of Oareford), the European Commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union, neither wants to pick up the pieces Johnson and Farage left, has also declared to resign.

And Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament, urges Britain to hand in its notification of intent to leave, invoke Article 50 of the EU Lisbon Treaty, which sets out a two-year timetable for negotiations on withdrawal, at the summit on Tuesday, ending uncertainty.

Theoretically the British parliament can decide to ignore the referendum, but will it dare? That depends partly on the number of people who signed the petition for a second referendum. That stands at

2,731,490 signatures right now.
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Online Taman Tun

Johhnie, It would be a complete travesty if Parliament overturned the will of the people.  Only 2 million have signed the petition but 18 million voted for Brexit.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline Johnnie F.

At the moment the EU is pushing for speeding up Article 50, but British politicians are trying to win time:

"Johnson, the favourite to succeed Cameron, has also said there is no need to hurry triggering the formal process, a move he believes would limit the UK’s room for manoeuvre." (guardian)

Guess the whole (lost) BREXIT gamble of not getting what they had asked for will change Britain's political landscape drastically. As I said before: "Who wants to pick up the pieces?"

Britain will have a hard time now finding politicians to take responsibility. The "old gits" will have to move out for the young. Actually, that was how I used to see Britain 40 - 50 years ago: as a young country with some old advisers. Now it has changed to an over-aged country with young advisers, who are not allowed to speak, "because they're immature dummies". If Britain wants to have a future they'll have to give more power to the young, not let "old gits" determine their future.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Quote from: Taman Tum
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill


That's a huge problem right now: Many Brits, who feel regret, cannot voice it. On the other hand politicians in the EU have a hard time to not express their content about GB leaving on their own volition, because they had been blocking too much. As a problem within the EU the loss of balance is seen by some countries, fearing Germany and France could becoming too powerful now.

"...after an emergency meeting of ministers from the bloc’s six founder members, Germany’s foreign minister, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, said negotiations should begin “as soon as possible” and that Britain had a responsibility to work with the EU on exit terms.

His French counterpart, Jean-Marc Ayrault, suggested that unless the UK acted fast, the sense of crisis could spread. He said there was “a certain urgency … so that we don’t have a period of uncertainty, with financial consequences, political consequences”. The president of the European commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, reinforced the message, saying the split with the UK was “not an amicable divorce” after what was not “a tight love affair, anyway”. Talks to end membership should begin immediately. (guardian)

The Washington Post also mocks the referendum and the #BREGRET:

"The whole world is reeling after a milestone referendum in Britain to leave the European Union. And although leaders of the campaign to exit Europe are crowing over their victory, it seems many Britons may not even know what they had actually voted for. "Even though I voted to leave, this morning I woke up and I just — the reality did actually hit me," one woman told the news channel ITV News. "If I'd had the opportunity to vote again, it would be to stay." That confusion over what Brexit might mean for the country's economy appears to have been reflected across the United Kingdom on Thursday. Google reported sharp upticks in searches not only related to the ballot measure but also about basic questions concerning the implications of the vote. At about 1 a.m. Eastern time, about eight hours after the polls closed, Google reported that searches for "what happens if we leave the EU" had more than tripled.

The run-up to the vote was marked by a bitterly divided campaign, one that was as much about immigration fears as it was about the global economy. But despite the all-out attempts by either side to court voters, Britons were not only mystified by what would happen if they left the E.U.— many seemed not to even know what the European Union is. What is the E.U.? To be fair, that question will now take on a much deeper significance than perhaps Google's users realized when they typed that into their browsers."

Reading European newspapers, many portray BREXIT as the chance to restructure the EU - and move closer together.

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Offline thaiga

Like i said :(


I wonder if the people who voted knew what they were voting for

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

No Brexiteer

  • Guest
It takes some courageous politicians in the House of Commons to declare the referendum invalid. But who wants to risk his political career for a flop?
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Only 2 million have signed the petition...

By now they're already more than 3 million and counting.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

New PM 'should come from Leave camp'

The new prime minister should only come from the Leave camp, former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith has said.

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr show that it would be "very difficult" for a public who voted to leave the EU to have a leader who had opposed this.

Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Friday that he will step down by October.

He had urged the country to vote Remain, but was defeated by 52% to 48%.

"The government itself now had a view... which was to remain and so now we need to change that position and actually deliver on this very clear mandate from the British people," Mr Duncan Smith said.

BBC.com

Of course! But who would be willing to pick up the pieces, and above all, who would be trusted to actually do so? :-[

But... a "very clear mandate"? Hardly, with a 52/48 split and BREGRET unfolding!
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

If this graph is near true, then the Brit "old gits" have really cheated on their children:



Source: BBC.com

The Telegraph devoted a long and detailed article to the possibilities of BREGRET. "It isn't over until it's over!" means Britain's membership will last at least until two years after notifying of article 50, it's intention to leave. Lots of things can happen till then... GB could even apply to join the EU later again.

There is also a good article in English on Spiegel.de about the advantages for the EU, if Britain is actually leaving.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

 



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