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Main Discussion Board => General Discussions => Home: Britain => Topic started by: thaiga on June 13, 2016, 06:46:52 PM

Title: The Brexit
Post by: thaiga on June 13, 2016, 06:46:52 PM
Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM

A government guarantee that protects pensions for millions of elderly people would be under threat if Britain quits the EU, Prime Minister David Cameron warned Sunday.

A so-called triple-lock guarantee has been government policy since 2010, ensuring an annual above-inflation rise in state pensions.

The grey-vote became the battleground in what is the last full week of campaigning ahead of a June 23 national referendum to decide if Britain should remain as a member of the European Union, or leave.

Cameron warned of a self-inflicted recession, leading to a lost decade as Britain grappled with a Brexit success.

"It would be irresponsible not to talk about the risks of leaving," he said, warning of a black hole of up to 57 billion U.S. dollars in Britain's public finances.

In the Sunday Telegraph, Cameron said: "We'd see a decline in the value of the pound, and of the value of the assets we own, like our homes. And because we'd probably need to raise interest rates to help deal with the shock, mortgage rates would rise.

"One area we'd be forced to look at is pensions. We said: pensioners should expect dignity and security in retirement. That's why we introduced the Triple Lock. It means that basic state pension will always rise in line with whichever is higher - earnings, inflation or 2.5 per cent.

"But if we had a big black hole, we could struggle to justify this special protection any longer. Even if we could justify it morally, it wouldn't actually be affordable. Not when pensions represent a huge portion of public spending - over 90 billion pounds (128 billion U.S. dollars) this year - and when inflation is forecast to hit 4 per cent if we leave Europe. So here is the reality: if we leave, the pensioner benefits would be under threat, and the Triple Lock could no longer be guaranteed in the long term."

Cameron's warning was roundly condemned by leave campaigners, with a number of commentators saying scare tactics could send people into the leave camp, resentful at being threatened by big-names in the remain camp.

Three Brexit-supporting MPs from Cameron's own Conservative Party, all rounded on Cameron. John Redwood, said MPs on all sides of the House of Commons would never vote for the triple-lock policy to be dropped.

"Mr Cameron's extraordinary claim that pensions might not be safe on Brexit is wrong," Redwood wrote on his social media site.

Iain Duncan Smith described Cameron's threat as baseless and vindictive, while Priti Patel accused Cameron of scaremongering and spreading fear.

The Sunday Express newspaper claimed emergency battle plans are being drawn up to try to win over "remain" voters after a series of opinion polls put Leave ahead.

The newspaper said plans will see Cameron take a back seat in the campaign after polling showed he has lost the trust of voters on the referendum issue.

Instead Labour, reported the Express, will be put in charge of winning over wavering voters in the North of England, while further efforts will be made to discredit prominent Leave supporters, including former London mayor Boris Johnson.

The Express quoted an unnamed source as saying Downing Street had been given a wake-up call and "now realised the prospect of Britain leaving the EU was very real."

The leader of the Church of England, Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby declared Sunday he supported Remain.

"June 23 is a date on which we, happily, do not literally have to fight for our freedom or future but we are going to make a choice that will change the lives of all of us, and the next generations, both in this country and indirectly for much of Europe," wrote Welby.

news.xinhuanet.com (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-06/13/c_135430899.htm)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: sowhat on June 13, 2016, 08:59:04 PM
What a cock up,Pensions for British elderly threatened,then do something about it,the poor old pensioners threatened again
some have worked all their lives and had it drummed into them "save for your old age".
what return are they getting on their savings,next to nothing,what are the expats here getting to the pound 49 today. :-[

i posted yesterday dear old vera lynn / There'll Always Be An England / yes.
but it will never be the same
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 14, 2016, 03:07:40 PM
Another scare mongering lie from globalist Cameron.  Stop the immigration and use that money spent on the misfits and give it to the pensioners.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 14, 2016, 06:06:47 PM
yes i know it's the sun. But ....

UK tabloid urges Britain to free itself from 'dictatorial Brussels' (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0sl949aX1iw#)

Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on June 15, 2016, 07:04:04 AM
So the Sun has come out firmly for Brexit as has the Mail and Telegraph.  But the world is waiting with baited breath to hear the official stance of Koratfart. WE DEMAND TO BE TOLD!
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 15, 2016, 07:56:37 AM
WE DEMAND TO BE TOLD!

IMO Europe could do fine without GB, FR and DE instead of those trying to dictate EU politics. Whether those could do as well without the EU market is another question.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 15, 2016, 12:04:12 PM
So the Sun has come out firmly for Brexit as has the Mail and Telegraph.  But the world is waiting with baited breath to hear the official stance of Koratfart. WE DEMAND TO BE TOLD!
You could be in for a bit of a wait there t/t :-X
While your waiting you might like to know  "The nervousness around the Brexit story increased the volatility in global bond markets"


World stocks unravel on Brexit fears

Stock markets extended a global sell-off Tuesday on rising prospects of Britain next week voting to leave the European Union.

Investors meanwhile started paying for the privilege of owning rock-solid German government bonds as fears of a possible Brexit and economic worries caused a rush to the safety of German debt.

Strong demand for German sovereign bonds, known as "Bunds", caused prices to peak, in turn pushing their yields into negative territory for the first time ever.

"The nervousness around the Brexit story increased the volatility in global bond markets," said Ipek Ozkardeskaya, market analyst at traders London Capital Group.

In a bid to seek safety, traders are piling also into the yen and gold, or alternative haven investments.

On Tuesday, the euro hit a 3.5-year low at 118.52 yen.

Caution across markets was reinforced also by policy meetings of the US, Japanese and British central banks taking place this week.

The Federal Reserve will conclude a two-day meeting Wednesday and while it is not expected to hike interest rates for several months, investors hope it will give some guidance on monetary policy.

Opinion is divided on whether the Bank of Japan will add to its stimulus when it finishes its own gathering Thursday, while the same day the Bank of England is widely expected to hold rates at 0.5%.

"Expectations of weak global growth and ever-enduring easy monetary policy, likely to be reinforced at central bank meetings this week, is seeing a mass exit from equities and feeding demand for bonds, sending yields to record lows," said Jasper Lawler, analyst at traders CMC Markets.

Around 1030 GMT in stock market trades, London's benchmark FTSE 100 index was down 1.3% compared with Monday's close.

In the eurozone, Frankfurt's DAX 30 lost 0.7% and the Paris CAC 40 slid 1.4%.

In Southeast Asia, stocks were cautious as investors played safe.

Index provider MSCI's decision on whether to allow domestic Chinese shares into its emerging markets index also dampened sentiment.

"MSCI's inclusion of China's A shares can also push the markets further sideways or it could have a short-term negative effect," Aller said.

"Even though inclusion will only take effect next year, it will reduce the weightage of other countries and have a greater impact on larger markets."

A decision to allow yuan-denominated shares - or A shares - into its widely used Emerging Markets Index, could draw $400 billion into Chinese shares in the next decade, MSCI estimates show.

The Philippine index closed down 1.25% on profit taking. Consumer cyclicals and utilities were the biggest drag on the index.

Singapore ended 0.6% weaker, its fourth consecutive day of losses as oil and gas stocks led the index lower on falling global oil prices.

Vietnam and Indonesia closed 0.3% higher, while Malaysia ended 0.2% lower.

Bangkokpost (http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/world/1010041/world-stocks-unravel-on-brexit-fears)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 16, 2016, 12:31:41 PM
Germany warns Brexit could lead to EU 'disintegration'

If the UK votes to leave the EU next week, the move could ultimately lead to the bloc's disintegration, Germany's foreign minister has warned.

Frank-Walter Steinmeier was speaking near Berlin after talks with his French counterpart, Jean-Marc Ayrault.

Mr Steinmeier warned against "a nationalism that pits one European state against another".

Leave campaigners in the UK have previously dismissed similar warnings as scaremongering.

The referendum on whether to leave or remain will be held on 23 June.

Germany is the UK's biggest trade partner in Europe.

"A vote to leave would shake the union," Mr Steinmeier said at a joint news conference in Brandenburg.

"It would not just carry on as 28 [members] minus one. It would require concerted efforts to ensure that the union holds together and that a decades-long, successful integration effort does not end in disintegration."

Mr Ayrault said the EU would keep evolving with the times.

"Europe can't be static, it must keep moving," he said. "Today it faces contradictions, slow-downs, difficulties, anxieties and fears. We want to give Europe a new dynamism."

bbc.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36544641)

England: Britain's EU referendum rivals clash on the Thames (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ioO5J41HoaY#)
Title: Re: “Britain’s not a quitter”
Post by: thaiga on June 20, 2016, 02:12:39 PM
“Britain’s not a quitter” says Cameron in Brexit debate

"Britain's not a quitter" says Cameron in EU tv debate (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RWmONeoco3U#)

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron made an impassioned call for voters to choose to stay in the EU when campaigning resumed on Sunday.

In a televised question and answer programme he said Britain isn't a quitter, Britain is a fighter.

"If we choose to leave, we can leave but let's be clear if we do leave we are walking out the door, we are quitting, we are giving up on this organisation which even if we leave will have a huge effect on our lives, our children, on our opportunities, on our .......

full article: euronews.com (http://www.euronews.com/2016/06/19/britain-s-not-a-quitter-says-cameron-in-eu-tv-debate)
Title: Re:The world waits on UK
Post by: thaiga on June 21, 2016, 01:25:48 PM
The world waits on UK

Thai economy unlikely to be badly hit by exit

Britain's European Union referendum has global markets on a knife edge. Fears of "Brexit" on Thursday have already gripped global equities and revved up demand for safe havens such as the Japanese yen, gold and the US dollar.

Many investors expect Britain to vote to leave the EU, while opinion polls put the Leave camp slightly ahead of the Remain campaign.

Yet the impact from Brexit on Thailand's trade and economy is likely to be limited even though it could have a ripple effect on the capital market.
Macro economy

The Thai economy is not expected to be directly affected by Brexit because exports to Britain only make up about 2% of Thailand's shipments, said Jitipol Puksamatanan, TMB Analytics' vice-president.

Britain's European Union referendum has global markets on a knife edge. Fears of "Brexit" on Thursday have already gripped global equities and revved up demand for safe havens such as the Japanese yen, gold and the US dollar.

Many investors expect Britain to vote to leave the EU, while opinion polls put the Leave camp slightly ahead of the Remain campaign.

Yet the impact from Brexit on Thailand's trade and economy is likely to be limited even though it could have a ripple effect on the capital market.

Macro economy

The Thai economy is not expected to be directly affected by Brexit because exports to Britain only make up about 2% of Thailand's shipments, said Jitipol Puksamatanan, TMB Analytics' vice-president.

"Direct impact on the Thai economy would not be substantial because of the minimal trade volume, but [Brexit] could have an effect on slowing global economic growth, which could in turn affect Thailand's economy," he said.

Since the EU and Britain account for only about 10% of Thailand's trade, slower investment in the EU and Britain could affect Thai exports of cars and integrated circuits, said Mr Jitipol, adding that food shipments are not expected to be affected by Brexit.

more here Bangkokpost (http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/news/1014769/the-world-waits-on-uk)
Title: Re: plunge in the sterling predicted if Britain votes to leave the EU
Post by: thaiga on June 21, 2016, 02:23:07 PM
George Soros predicts Brexit 'Black Friday'

 Billionaire George Soros, who famously profited by betting against the pound in a 1992 currency crisis, has predicted a plunge in the sterling if Britain votes to leave the European Union.

The business magnate forecast an even steeper drop than occurred on "Black Wednesday", which forced Britain to withdraw from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, in an article in the Guardian newspaper published late Monday.

"If Britain leaves the EU it will have at least one very clear and immediate effect that will touch every household: the value of the pound would decline precipitously," the 85-year-old wrote.

He estimated a drop for the currency of at least 15%.

"Then ironically one pound would be worth about one euro –- a method of 'joining the euro' that nobody in Britain would want," Soros added.

The pro-Brexit side have accused "Remain" campaigners of scare tactics by arguing that a vote to leave the EU on Thursday would damage Britain's economy.

Soros warned that leaving the EU would lower house prices and cause job losses, potentially causing a recession.

One of the world's richest men according to Forbes magazine, Soros warned that powerful "speculative forces" would be "eager to exploit any miscalculations by the British government or British voters".

"A vote for Brexit would make some people very rich -– but most voters considerably poorer," Soros wrote.

"A vote to leave could see the week end with a Black Friday, and serious consequences for ordinary people."

After earlier surveys indicated narrow gains for the "Remain" camp, global markets rallied and the pound rose to a three-month peak.

But the latest polls published ahead of the June 23 vote suggest the result could go either way.

Bangkokpos (http://www.bangkokpost.com/business/world/1015997/george-soros-predicts-brexit-black-friday)t
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on June 21, 2016, 04:25:45 PM
Interesting headline in the Guardian today:- David Beckham supports Remain.  Well, Whoopee doo.  Personally, I do not think the country has much future either in or out.  I suspect most people on this forum came to a similar conclusion long ago and I made my own personal Brexit about 15 years back.  Aside from the Beckham story there is an interesting Guardian story about a report on corruption by Transparency International.  Here is a short extract which says it all:-

This has led Transparency International itself to label the City of London the world’s “number-one home for the fruits of corruption”; anti-mafia journalist Robert Saviano believes the practices of the City have transformed the UK into the most corrupt nation on earth. It is impossible to analyse urban corruption in any form without placing London and its financial industry at the heart of the problem. Via its deregulatory impulses and unparalleled influence on the global economic system, London’s financial core has exported the conditions necessary for wide-scale corruption to countless other cities around the planet, while at the same time offering a safe haven for corrupt money that makes the job of tackling urban corruption in all those other cities far more difficult.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 23, 2016, 01:14:17 PM
The ANZACS are waiting for the return of their motherland and the wonderful true Brits into the fold of the Commonwealth. The EU has been a disaster and leaving it is a no brainer.
May God bless the Brits.  Your blood brethren, the ANZACS are with you.
Regards
Title: Re: EU referendum: UK goes to the polls
Post by: thaiga on June 23, 2016, 02:10:45 PM
EU referendum: UK goes to the polls

Polls have opened in a historic referendum on whether the UK should remain a member of the European Union or leave.

An estimated 46,499,537 people are entitled to take part in the vote - a record number for a UK poll.

Polling stations opened at 07:00 BST and will close at 22:00 BST.

It is only the third nationwide referendum in UK history and comes after a four-month battle for votes between the Leave and Remain campaigns.

In common with other broadcasters, the BBC is limited in what it can report while polls are open but you can follow the results as they come in across the BBC after polls close on Thursday evening.

The referendum ballot paper asks the following question: "Should the United Kingdom remain a member of the European Union or leave the European Union?"

Whichever side gets more than half of all votes cast is considered to have won.

The weather forecast for polling day is mixed.

There have been thunderstorms in London and south-east England which caused flooding overnight.

Sunshine and heavy showers are forecast for Northern Ireland and Scotland but it is set to be drier and brighter elsewhere.

After the referendum polls close, sealed ballot boxes will be collected and transported to the count venue for each of the 382 local counting areas.

These represent all 380 local government areas in England, Scotland and Wales, plus one each for Northern Ireland and Gibraltar.

Individual areas' results will then be declared throughout the night, along with results from 11 regional counts.

Depending on how close the poll is, the result may become clear before the final national result is officially declared by the Chief Counting Officer, who will be based at Manchester Town Hall.

The Electoral Commission estimates a final result "around breakfast time" on Friday.

bbc.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36602702)
Title: Re: Value of pensions for British expats in question
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 10:42:10 AM
If you could have changed your GBP savings to THB yesterday, you would have got a decent exchange rate of about 52 THB per GBP. Now you can only hope to get it changed at one of the top swings, which move roughly between 46 and 48.

If a country is as divided at an important question as REMAIN and EXIT,  only those are winners who know how to speculate the exchange rates like George Soros. How much will he gain of it again? And how many expats will have to do visa runs again, because the conversion of their pensions does not fulfill immigration requirements for the annual extension any longer?

Quote
Pound tumbles to lows not seen since 1985

The value of the pound has fallen dramatically as it emerged that the UK had voted to leave the EU.

At one stage, it hit $1.3305, a fall of more than 10%, and a low not seen since 1985.

The Bank of England said it was "monitoring developments closely" and would take "all necessary steps" to support monetary stability.

Before the results started to come in, the pound had risen as high as $1.50, as traders bet on a Remain victory.

But following early strong Leave votes in north-east England, it tumbled to $1.43 and then took another dive after 03:00 BST as Leave maintained its lead.

The move in sterling is the biggest one-day fall ever seen and London's main share index, the FTSE 100, is expected to open sharply lower, with indications of a fall of about 7%.

A weaker pound buys fewer dollars or other foreign currencies, which makes it more expensive to buy products from abroad. However, it should benefit exporters as it makes their goods cheaper abroad.

Against the euro, the pound dropped 7% to about €1.2085.

The euro also fell 3.3% against the dollar, its biggest one-day fall since the currency's inception.

Currency traders say these moves are more extreme than those seen during the financial crisis of 2008.

"Never seen anything like it. These are once-in-a-lifetime moves, bigger than Lehmans and Black Wednesday," said Joe Rundle, head of trading at ETX Capital.

"We're waiting for the big money to crank into action over the coming days and even weeks, which will likely exert further downward pressure on sterling."

Around midnight, sterling had risen to $1.50 after leading Leave campaigner Nigel Farage said it looked as though Remain had "edged" the vote.

But those gains were short-lived as the first results showed surprisingly strong votes to leave the EU.

As for shares, the markets are pointing to a 8% slump when the FTSE 100 opens on Friday.

"The Bank of England is monitoring developments closely," the Bank said in a statement.

"It has undertaken extensive contingency planning and is working closely with HM Treasury, other domestic authorities and overseas central banks. The Bank of England will take all necessary steps to meet its responsibilities for monetary and financial stability."
'Nervous moves'

In Tokyo, the Nikkei 225 share index has fallen by more than 8%, with the yen up 5% as investors piled into the Japanese currency, which is seen as a safe haven.

The Bank of Japan (BoJ) said it stood ready to supply money to the markets if necessary.

"The BoJ, in close co-operation with relevant domestic and foreign authorities, will continue to carefully monitor how the [UK referendum] would affect global financial markets," the Bank's governor, Haruhiko Kuroda, said in a statement.

Japan's finance minister, Taro Aso, said he was ready to respond to movements on the currency market if necessary to prevent "extremely nervous moves".

A increase in the value of the Japanese yen hurts the country's exporting companies.

In commodities, the price of gold jumped nearly 7% to $1,348.27 an ounce.


BBC.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/business-36611512)

Edit 1:25 pm: Quote updated
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 24, 2016, 12:46:51 PM
I exchanged 50% of my assets in the uk to thai bht a little while ago, got just under 51 to the pound.

yes what about those guys that depend on their pension rates to cover their immigration requirements to do the annual extension, not a lot of people see this one coming, shouting from the rooftops leave the EU (inc myself)

So do we change our tune now to in in in ... Expats have been battered one way or another for a long time, wonder if the thai authorities will give any lee way. :-[

todays rates @ bangkokbank

                       buying       selling

USD: 50-100      34.90      35.77    

United Kingdom   45.93    48.86    

Euro Zone           37.87    39.57    
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened - Next steps for EU after Brexit
Post by: thaiga on June 24, 2016, 01:37:18 PM
from the Bangkokpost (http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/world/1018885/dutch-anti-immigration-leader-calls-for-referendum)

Dutch anti-immigration leader Geert Wilders called on Friday for a referendum on the Netherlands' membership in the European Union after Britain voted to leave the 28-member bloc.

Mr Wilders, who is leading opinion polls, said if he is elected prime minister in March general elections in the Netherlands he too will call a referendum.

"We want be in charge of our own country, our own money, our own borders, and our own immigration policy"

Next steps for EU after Brexit

After Britain voted to leave the European Union, the next hours, days and weeks will be crucial for the future of the bloc.

Here are the next steps after Brexit:

SAVE THE MARKETS

With the stability of the global economy at risk, early Friday the European Central Bank is widely expected to make a statement to reassure markets.

TOP EU OFFICIALS REACT

The EU's top officials meet in Brussels at 10.30am on Friday.

EU President Donald Tusk, European Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker, European Parliament head Martin Schulz and Dutch Prime Minister Mark Rutte, whose country holds the six-month EU presidency, are expected to make a statement and address the press at around midday.

MINISTERS TACKLE BREXIT

The EU's 28 European Affairs Ministers meet in Luxembourg to lay the groundwork for Brexit talks at the EU summit on June 28-29. 

GERMAN SOLUTIONS

Foreign ministers from the EU's six founding countries -- France, Germany, Italy, Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxembourg -- are expected to meet on Saturday in Berlin, according to European sources.

French President Francois Hollande will meet with German Chancellor Angela Merkel next week to discuss "European initiatives", expected on Monday.

FRANCO-GERMAN INITIATIVE

The Merkel Hollande meet-up could be the occasion to announce plans for a long-rumoured Franco-German initiative on a better integrated defence and security strategy for Europe.

The leaders are seeking to use the plan to dispel doubts on the EU project unleashed by the British vote campaign.

BRUSSELS ACTS

On Monday the European Commission's top officials, who are nominated by the EU's 28 member states, begin mapping out the long road to an official Brexit at an extraordinary meeting in Brussels.

MEPs have also called for an extraordinary session of the European Parliament to be held in Brussels on Monday in the case of a Brexit vote.

THE 'BREXIT' SUMMIT

The 28 EU leaders -- still including British Prime Minister David Cameron -- meet on June 28 and 29 in Brussels to digest and debate the results of Thursday's Leave vote.

It was originally due to be held on June 23 but was postponed after the British referendum date was announced.

Cameron may trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, officially notifying EU leaders of Britain's intention to leave.

ENTER SLOVAKIA

On July 1st, the Netherlands hands over the EU's six-month rotating presidency to the relatively inexperienced Slovakia, which now must lead the negotiations towards Brexit.

Britain had been due to take the helm at the end of 2017 but will now give that up.

CRUEL SUMMER

EU civil servants delay summer holidays to begin the painstaking legal work to bring about Brexit. The official British divorce from Europe would take at least two years.

But EU president Donald Tusk has warned that the whole process of negotiating trade and immigration deals with a non-EU Britain could take seven years in all.

Bangkokpost (http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/world/1018905/next-steps-for-eu-after-brexit)
Title: Re: ...warned British PM and quits now leaving it to someone else to help
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 03:13:57 PM
Next "good" news:

Brexit: David Cameron to quit after UK votes to leave EU (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36615028)

Now who'll be able to

Average White Band - Pick Up The Pieces (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FnH_zwVmiuE#)

Boris Johnson? Hardly!

And what will the Northern Irish and Scottish have of it? Independence maybe?

not a lot of people see this one coming, shouting from the rooftops leave the EU


It was all over the international press last few days, last Monday in the Guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2016/jun/20/brexit-crash-pound-living-standards-george-soros) for example, that just the infamous George Soros warned of a "Black Friday" in case of a BREXIT vote: "The Brexit crash will make all of you poorer – be warned ". But who could listen to a "carpetbagger" like him?

Quote
"We're waiting for the big money to crank into action over the coming days and even weeks, which will likely exert further downward pressure on sterling."


As the Euro also has been dragged down some by that, all will hope on the much hated ECB to help and dampen the international impact, I guess. The Commonwealth won't be able, I think.

Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 05:06:54 PM
A chance to rethink?

Petition: EU Referendum Rules Triggering a Second EU Referendum

The 48% of voters who wished to Remain in the European Union are so mortified by the Leave result that a parliamentary petition calling for a second referendum has been set up.

‘We the undersigned call upon HM Government to implement a rule that if the remain or leave vote is less than 60% based on a turnout less than 75% there should be another referendum,’ it reads.

At the time of writing, the petition is difficult to access, presumably due to a surge of traffic. The count is at 55,000 right now and climbing at roughly a thousand signatures a minute.

All petitions to the site that receive over 100,000 signatures must be considered for debate in Parliament, as was the case with the cannabis legalisation one.

Update 9:04am: petition.parliament.uk completely inaccessible.

Independent (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/brexit-petition-for-second-eu-referendum-so-popular-the-government-sites-crashing-a7099996.html)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 24, 2016, 05:50:43 PM
I'll bet the Chelsea Premier League champions of 2014/15 were mortified that Leicester City  won the Premier League title in 2015/2016 in one of the greatest sporting results. If we can get enough signatures to ask for  a replay of Leicester City's games maybe we can get the result we want.  But of course if we do get a referendum and win it, whats stopping the opposition for applying for another referendum to change it all back again and so on and so on for infinity.  Spoilt babies crying over not getting what they wanted.  Shame on these people who are unable to abide by the rule of the referee via the ballet box.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 06:24:33 PM
It was extremely naive of Cameron not to set a quorum of 75% participation and a 2/3 majority for a valid result in this highly important matter affecting the whole world to get at least half the voice of the electorate deciding. Neither Johnson asked for that. Both are not qualified to lead Britain and the world out of this man-made crisis. The EU will survive without Britain and not suffer huge losses, but Britain won't become any "greater", but more likely smaller now.

Attempts from Geert Wilders in the Netherlands or Marine Le Pen in France to follow the example neither will make the world any better.

But clever business people playing the stock and money exchange will gain riches; workers and pensioners mainly in Britain and also to some extent in the EU will have to pay the price!
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 24, 2016, 07:30:45 PM
Hello Johnnie F.- There were no percentage thresholds used for the first referendum for the United Kingdom EC referendum of 5 June 1975. It was the side with the most votes to win, as it was for this referendum. At the time the electorate expressed significant support for EEC membership, with 67% in favour on a 65% turnout. So the rules used then are the same rules used for this 2016 referendum.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 07:35:49 PM
That's no reason to repeat a mistake, since it hardly were the same people voting in the same context. But as you might have understood from my previous posts, I personally am pretty unaffected. Germany or my pension won't suffer great losses. ;)

The last time I set foot on that island was in 1986, and I don't see need going there again in my lifetime.  :)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 24, 2016, 07:42:20 PM
Hello Johnnie F - Perhaps the first outcome in 1975 was a mistake?  Perhaps joining the EU was the greatest  mistake? No mistakes were made at either time as both sides knew the rules.  The opposition who lost in the 1975 referendum didn't cry over the results or gather a petition to have the vote taken again.
The side with the most votes wins.  It's as simple as that. I have great faith and optimism for the Brits.  I hope time will make it so.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 08:05:22 PM
Maybe it was a mistake; I can't tell; at that time I knew a few young Brits, who had come over to Germany to seek their fortunes. In 1974 I was visiting Britain for the first time. Of course I was impressed by it being differently, by the popular culture, that could spread in Britain rather freely, while in Germany it was still suppressed by conservative forces, young people still trying to overcome the shackle of WW2 and gain their own identity for young Germans. Britain was FREEDOM for me at that time. That there could be even more FREEDOM I saw the following year, when I went to the US for the first time. Now Germany has developed into almost as much FREEDOM already. Britain appears more like having stood in the rain since then.

It's a natural process, that people become older, sometimes even more mature, by the time. That's why more younger people expressed their intentions to vote REMAIN than older people. But voting for BREXIT or REMAIN wasn't merely a question of reversing the 1975 decision, since not only the electorate but all circumstances have changed in the meantime. It was a decision about it's future, and that needs to get more careful consideration by the people affected, the young people. I hope the petition to be successful.

If one makes a mistake, he has two options: reversing the mistake or making the best of it.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 24, 2016, 08:39:04 PM
Hello Johnnie F - I hope the petition fails because if it doesn't then a civil war with blood in the streets and in the homes may be the result.  The people have spoken via the ballot box.  The future concerns all Brits young and old and we wouldn't be in this current position if we hadn't joined the EU in the first place.  Yes, times have changed for the worse and something had to be done to reverse this trend.  Another petition for another referendum is certainly divisive and dangerous. The people have spoken and reversed the first mistake and opted out of the EU.  Britain will prevail and is now on the right track.  As your own words testify, Britain has stood in the rain since then (1975).  They stood in the rain under a ripped umbrella provided by the faceless unelected bureaucrats in Brussels and were given the privilege of doing so at the rate of 55 million pounds a day. 
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 09:17:11 PM
As I said before: "If one makes a mistake, he has two options: reversing the mistake or making the best of it." Cameron tried to make the best by negotiating with and exerting influence on Brussels, just not successfully. Instead of trying to deliver valid and acceptable arguments he reached for the BREXIT "argument". It backfired! He shouldn't have given up trying to negotiate, and attempting "blackmail" instead. It's for others to suffer now. Sorting out the mess will take years anyway; who knows what will be next? Gibraltar, who voted 96% against BREXIT, doesn't want to be part of the "Ununited Kingdom" anymore, their lives are based on relations to Spain. It's a question of survival for them. Will Britain be able to compensate? Most likely not!

So do Scotland (62% against BREXIT)and Northern Ireland (55.7% against BREXIT). Do you think those people will enjoy the English forcing them to give up what they built their lives on? And in London, the mighty metropolis, 59.9% didn't want BREXIT, either. Do you think there only would be a civil war, if the mistake gets corrected? Britain faces hard times!

London is the center of Britain like Bangkok is the center of Thailand. The London elite will defend what they see as their right, what they built their lives on, like the Bangkok elite does, when the peasants of Isaan rise.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 24, 2016, 09:46:01 PM
Was it a DDOS-attack of BREXIT-supporters, or just too many Brits feeling that things went totally wrong with the referendum?

Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 24, 2016, 11:53:08 PM
As I said before: "If one makes a mistake, he has two options: reversing the mistake or making the best of it." Cameron tried to make the best by negotiating with and exerting influence on Brussels, just not successfully. Instead of trying to deliver valid and acceptable arguments he reached for the BREXIT "argument". It backfired! He shouldn't have given up trying to negotiate, and attempting "blackmail" instead. It's for others to suffer now. Sorting out the mess will take years anyway; who knows what will be next? Gibraltar, who voted 96% against BREXIT, doesn't want to be part of the "Ununited Kingdom" anymore, their lives are based on relations to Spain. It's a question of survival for them. Will Britain be able to compensate? Most likely not!

So do Scotland (62% against BREXIT)and Northern Ireland (55.7% against BREXIT). Do you think those people will enjoy the English forcing them to give up what they built their lives on? And in London, the mighty metropolis, 59.9% didn't want BREXIT, either. Do you think there only would be a civil war, if the mistake gets corrected? Britain faces hard times!

London is the center of Britain like Bangkok is the center of Thailand. The London elite will defend what they see as their right, what they built their lives on, like the Bangkok elite does, when the peasants of Isaan rise.

Johnnie F. If those areas do not want to be part of the UK  it would be wise to let them go and let them choose their own future destiny.  It is rather that simple. Why struggle with an Albatross tied to ones neck when they want to be free and not subject to domination by others?
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 25, 2016, 12:02:53 AM
Was it a DDOS-attack of BREXIT-supporters, or just too many Brits feeling that things went totally wrong with the referendum?
Johnnie F.- I would guess that the cry babies who didn't get their way are responsible for their own feelings.  What went totally wrong with the referendum, for them, is that they lost. Get over it and embrace  the challenge to make England great again. England has a wonderful and prosperous future. God bless the true Brits.
As a German, what is your agenda in promoting the EU?
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 25, 2016, 12:25:28 AM
Johnnie F. If Northern Ireland, Gibraltar and Scotland do not want to be part of the UK it would be wise to let them go and let them choose their own future destiny.  It is rather that simple. Why struggle with an Albatross tied to one’s neck when they want to be free and not subject to domination by England? It wasn't too long ago, 18 September 2014 when Scotland was given a referendum “Should Scotland be an independent country”? The "No" side won, with 2,001,926 (55.3%) voting against independence and 1,617,989 (44.7%) voting in favour. The turnout of 84.6% was the highest recorded for an election or referendum in the United Kingdom since the introduction of universal suffrage.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 09:49:07 AM

Johnnie F. If those areas do not want to be part of the UK  it would be wise to let them go and let them choose their own future destiny.  It is rather that simple. Why struggle with an Albatross tied to ones neck when they want to be free and not subject to domination by others?
Regards

We finally agree on something. Now we have to wait! Do you really think any conservative Brit will allow any part of "Great" Britain to "disintegrate" and choose its own future and freedom in today's world?  ;)


It wasn't too long ago, 18 September 2014 when Scotland was given a referendum “Should Scotland be an independent country”? The "No" side won, with 2,001,926 (55.3%) voting against independence and 1,617,989 (44.7%) voting in favour. The turnout of 84.6% was the highest recorded for an election or referendum in the United Kingdom since the introduction of universal suffrage.
Regards

You can't imagine things to be different now, after a BREXIT, do you? ;)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 10:10:03 AM
make England great again.

I agree, it badly needs that now. But with a 52/48 split it will most likely drift the opposite direction.  8)

What Britain needs most now, is unification, not one half suppressing the other half, with only a hand full deciding who suppresses and who gets suppressed. It needs to be a united kingdom, not just using that as name!

Quote
England has a wonderful and prosperous future.

Unless British people and British politicians do run it down even further with more "bar-room politics" and boulevard media manipulation.

Quote
God bless the true Brits.
As a German, what is your agenda in promoting the EU?
Regards

Dear Aussie,

you might not believe how often I heard Brits in Korat "play the nationalist card"! They need help as much as Germans "playing the nationalist card". Because all of those have not understood, that in today's world not only Big Money and Big Business think and act global; people gotta adjust to that, too, especially mentally, if they want to be able to keep their stand against those and not become poorer again by their own "turning back the clock" without proper regard to the times having changed not only in one perspective.

You can't understand, why I, as a German, do not think of Germany and Europe in the first place, but of people and the world?

Now try to understand, why a German does invest the effort and money to run a forum in English for Korat! Could it be that there is something else than nationalism? ;)

BTW, you sound like a deceased member of this forum, when he first met me ten years ago on the old Koratfarang forum. When I was attacked there by some Brits and Aussies with nationalism, he - then still thinking nationalistic himself - aggressively advised me to open my own forum instead of using "theirs". I followed his advice, first with Korat-Info and then this here. He then joined both, having understood, that here in Korat, we cannot live like being in our hometown back in Britain or elsewhere, but also need to move here mentally, broaden our perspectives. He became a very good friend.  ;)
RIP SAF (sicho)
Title: Re: After the BREXIT vote - the economy reacting
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 12:18:09 PM
Just an example:

Quote
Dear Customer,
Due to recent fluctuations in currency values and exchange rates we have reviewed our pricing across all currencies and wish to inform you we will be making some changes to our pricing.
Where possible we have aimed to bring the benefit of these currency value changes to our customers (for example .co.uk domains will now be priced at 6.51 USD {previously 7.10 USD}) but there will be some domains which are now more expensive, particularly in the GBP and EUR currencies.
A full list of the new pricing is attached to this email.
As these market fluctuations are ongoing and unpredictable, we may be forced to make further changes at short notice in the coming weeks. We appreciate your patience and understanding as we attempt to limit the impact of these external forces.
Thank you very much for you continued business, we hope that the changes are beneficial to your personal requirements.
Yours truly,
The Internet.bs team

That's what our domain host wrote to me yesterday, announcing, that the domain koratfart.com will cost more in future, if paid in GBP or EUR.
Title: Re: After the BREXIT vote - the economy reacting
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 01:09:15 PM
London, 24 June 2016 -- Moody's Investors Service has today changed the outlook on the UK's long term issuer and debt ratings to negative from stable. Both ratings are affirmed at Aa1.

Read here (https://www.moodys.com/research/Moodys-changes-outlook-on-UK-sovereign-rating-to-negative-from--PR_350566) why.

And how do EU politicians react:
"The EU’s top leaders have said they expect the UK to act on its momentous vote to leave the union “as soon as possible, however painful that process may be” and that there will be “no renegotiation”.

The presidents of the European council, commission and parliament – Donald Tusk, Jean-Claude Juncker and Martin Schulz respectively – and Mark Rutte, the prime minister of the Netherlands which holds the EU’s rotating presidency, said any delay to Britain’s exit would “unnecessarily prolong uncertainty”. (Guardian (https://www.google.co.th/search?q=juncker+britain+brexit&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&client=firefox-b&gws_rd=cr&ei=fSFuV_P0H4P6vATdkJyYBg))
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: No Brexiteer on June 25, 2016, 01:53:27 PM
The pints did it!

Restrict pubs' opening times and sales of alcohol to both young and old. :-[
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 02:25:16 PM
They seem to have fixed the petitions page. By now:

EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum (https://petition.parliament.uk/petitions/131215)

734,792 signatures, with a rapidly rising number.

Very interesting is this map (http://petitionmap.unboxedconsulting.com/?petition=131215), where you can check from which constituency already how many people have voted. The darker red the more votes.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 03:19:17 PM
Another petition on change.org (https://www.change.org/)

Declare London independent from the UK and apply to join the EU. (https://www.change.org/p/sadiq-khan-declare-london-independent-from-the-uk-and-apply-to-join-the-eu) is at

109,767 votes now.

Now what will Britain do without its capital? Be a "decapitated" country? Or have its capital in the EU only, be governed "from the EU"? ;)

I'm confident that the British citizens will find a way out of the dilemma the populist Boris Johnson has got them into.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on June 25, 2016, 03:53:11 PM
Things have not gone quite according to plan for Bo Jo.  He was hoping for a narrow Remain victory which would enable him to take over from Cameron after a decent interval.  Instead he is now faced with having to deal with unraveling from the EU starting from his very first day on the job.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 03:59:38 PM
(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/BREXIT.png)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 04:52:53 PM
The petition EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum (http://EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum)

already passed the million mark and stands at 1,015,700 signatures right now. People do understand the necessity of acting fast to minimize the damage done by the referendum.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on June 25, 2016, 04:59:06 PM
It is a well known EU tactic.  If you ask a question and do not get the answer you want then you ask the question again.  The people have spoken.. Just get over it.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 05:16:23 PM
It is a well known EU tactic.

It's a British petition; only Brits can vote. And its strings are not pulled by the EU. The EU made things already very clear: Get out fast, to end uncertainties. The Brit government needs to submit its formal resignation. But there seems to be a huge number of British voters who feel cheated and want to reconsider. That is possible until the formal resignation has been submitted. But the EU must push for doing that soon, if at all, so the world can go on with its business as usual.

The vote count on that petition is accelerating very fast: 1,085,516 signatures
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 25, 2016, 05:17:56 PM
The petition EU Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum ([url]http://EU[/url] Referendum Rules triggering a 2nd EU Referendum)

already passed the million mark and stands at 1,015,700 signatures right now. People do understand the necessity of acting fast to minimize the damage done by the referendum.

Johnnie F. - You keep pushing the line of lets return to the EU and minimise the damage.  What a load of (http://serve.mysmiley.net/sign/sign0055.gif).  The damage the EU has caused for the real Brits of the UK for the last 43 years is on record.  I do not understand why you are so elated that people are signing a petition to reverse the outcome of the referendum.  Please come clean with your reasoning.  With respect, I am suspicious of your motives.  Please prove me wrong.
I'm 100 % behind Taman Tun when I say get over it.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 05:25:02 PM
Johnnie F. - You keep pushing the line of lets return to the EU and minimise the damage.  What a load of ([url]http://serve.mysmiley.net/sign/sign0055.gif[/url]).  The damage the EU has caused for the real Brits of the UK for the last 43 years is on record.  I do not understand why you are so elated that people are signing a petition to reverse the outcome of the referendum.  Please come clean with your reasoning.  With respect, I am suspicious of your motives.  Please prove me wrong.
I'm 100 % behind Taman Tun when I say get over it.
Regards


The EU will be getting over it easily. But why do you project my impartial reporting of what British people are doing right now as "personal interest"?  ;)

Does it hurt you personally? If you don't like it, don't read it, don't answer to it, don't "challenge" it!  :-[
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Aussie on June 25, 2016, 05:45:02 PM
Johnnie F. - Why do you continually push the line of lets return to the EU and minimise the damage?  What damage are you talking about? Why aren't you also presenting  the line that Britain is better off without the Europhiles and the disasters Brussels has caused.  If you want  a balanced reaction on this forum present a balanced view.
Regards
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 05:57:00 PM
My views are balanced. Are yours?  ;)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: No Brexiteer on June 25, 2016, 06:16:39 PM
Ahh forgive him, JF, it is hot in Australia. Wonder why the chap so aggressively takes side with one side of divided Britain, trying to keep you from reporting about British efforts to redo a mistake? Why should they be hidden? But already these efforts do show the world that Britain isn't so unreliable to let a mistake just sit.

Cheers

No Brexiteer
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 06:24:59 PM
Things have not gone quite according to plan for Bo Jo.  He was hoping for a narrow Remain victory which would enable him to take over from Cameron after a decent interval.  Instead he is now faced with having to deal with unraveling from the EU starting from his very first day on the job.

That's exactly the point: an ambitious politician for personal gain led people in populist manner to a disaster he won't be able to help them out anymore. What are the people doing about it, once they have realized what went wrong? Watching that to unfold is very interesting for me. It has nothing to do with other "motives".
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 25, 2016, 06:46:20 PM
I'm in the just get over it camp and make the best of what you can - if there is any british spirit left in der country man. But .....

I wonder if the people who voted knew what they were voting for. The expats on a pension living in an EU country, things could go tits up so easily, lets hope it don't.

Those who supported the referendum are already voicing their regret, saying they didn’t think their vote would matter.
The regret is hitting in now.

A BBC interview with a man who voted in favor of the successful Brexit measure to have the U.K. leave the European Union has gone viral after he stated that he didn’t think his vote “was going to matter” and that he is “worried” about its ramifications.

Reaction of Man Who Voted for Brexit Goes Viral: ‘I’m a Bit Shocked’ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HrdJi0daG-Y#)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 25, 2016, 10:32:46 PM
Following the EU referendum results,  "What is the EU?" and "Who will replace David Cameron?" were top searched questions in the UK.

As the pound fell after the EU referendum results, search interest in "pound to euro" and "pound to dollar" spiked.

The UK is not the only country searching for the EU referendum. Top questions from across the EU include "What is 'Brexit'?" and "Why does the UK want to leave the EU?"

Google trends (https://www.google.com/trends/story/GB_cu_EoBj9FIBAAAj9M_en)

The petition for a new vote is at 1,803,987 signatures.

And young people, who feel cheated by the "old gits politics", protest in London:

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/brexit-jugendbewegung.jpeg)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 09:24:09 AM
Jonathan Hill (The Lord Hill of Oareford), the European Commissioner for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union, neither wants to pick up the pieces Johnson and Farage left, has also declared to resign.

And Martin Schulz, President of the European Parliament, urges Britain to hand in its notification of intent to leave, invoke Article 50 of the EU Lisbon Treaty, which sets out a two-year timetable for negotiations on withdrawal, at the summit on Tuesday, ending uncertainty.

Theoretically the British parliament can decide to ignore the referendum, but will it dare? That depends partly on the number of people who signed the petition for a second referendum. That stands at

2,731,490 signatures right now.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on June 26, 2016, 10:51:31 AM
Johhnie, It would be a complete travesty if Parliament overturned the will of the people.  Only 2 million have signed the petition but 18 million voted for Brexit.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 11:08:12 AM
At the moment the EU is pushing for speeding up Article 50, but British politicians are trying to win time:

"Johnson, the favourite to succeed Cameron, has also said there is no need to hurry triggering the formal process, a move he believes would limit the UK’s room for manoeuvre." (guardian (http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/25/uk-faces-brexit-crisis))

Guess the whole (lost) BREXIT gamble of not getting what they had asked for will change Britain's political landscape drastically. As I said before: "Who wants to pick up the pieces?"

Britain will have a hard time now finding politicians to take responsibility. The "old gits" will have to move out for the young. Actually, that was how I used to see Britain 40 - 50 years ago: as a young country with some old advisers. Now it has changed to an over-aged country with young advisers, who are not allowed to speak, "because they're immature dummies". If Britain wants to have a future they'll have to give more power to the young, not let "old gits" determine their future.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 12:50:38 PM
Quote from: Taman Tum
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill


That's a huge problem right now: Many Brits, who feel regret, cannot voice it. On the other hand politicians in the EU have a hard time to not express their content about GB leaving on their own volition, because they had been blocking too much. As a problem within the EU the loss of balance is seen by some countries, fearing Germany and France could becoming too powerful now.

"...after an emergency meeting of ministers from the bloc’s six founder members, Germany’s foreign minister, Frank-Walter Steinmeier, said negotiations should begin “as soon as possible” and that Britain had a responsibility to work with the EU on exit terms.

His French counterpart, Jean-Marc Ayrault, suggested that unless the UK acted fast, the sense of crisis could spread. He said there was “a certain urgency … so that we don’t have a period of uncertainty, with financial consequences, political consequences”. The president of the European commission, Jean-Claude Juncker, reinforced the message, saying the split with the UK was “not an amicable divorce” after what was not “a tight love affair, anyway”. Talks to end membership should begin immediately. (guardian (http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/jun/25/uk-faces-brexit-crisis))

The Washington Post (https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-switch/wp/2016/06/24/the-british-are-frantically-googling-what-the-eu-is-hours-after-voting-to-leave-it/?wpisrc=nl_wemost-draw4&wpmm=1) also mocks the referendum and the #BREGRET:

"The whole world is reeling after a milestone referendum in Britain to leave the European Union. And although leaders of the campaign to exit Europe are crowing over their victory, it seems many Britons may not even know what they had actually voted for. "Even though I voted to leave, this morning I woke up and I just — the reality did actually hit me," one woman told the news channel ITV News. "If I'd had the opportunity to vote again, it would be to stay." That confusion over what Brexit might mean for the country's economy appears to have been reflected across the United Kingdom on Thursday. Google reported sharp upticks in searches not only related to the ballot measure but also about basic questions concerning the implications of the vote. At about 1 a.m. Eastern time, about eight hours after the polls closed, Google reported that searches for "what happens if we leave the EU" had more than tripled.

The run-up to the vote was marked by a bitterly divided campaign, one that was as much about immigration fears as it was about the global economy. But despite the all-out attempts by either side to court voters, Britons were not only mystified by what would happen if they left the E.U.— many seemed not to even know what the European Union is. What is the E.U.? To be fair, that question will now take on a much deeper significance than perhaps Google's users realized when they typed that into their browsers."

Reading European newspapers, many portray BREXIT as the chance to restructure the EU - and move closer together.

Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 26, 2016, 03:18:02 PM
Like i said :(


I wonder if the people who voted knew what they were voting for

Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: No Brexiteer on June 26, 2016, 04:21:59 PM
It takes some courageous politicians in the House of Commons to declare the referendum invalid. But who wants to risk his political career for a flop?
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 04:28:15 PM
Only 2 million have signed the petition...

By now they're already more than 3 million and counting.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 04:47:23 PM
New PM 'should come from Leave camp'

The new prime minister should only come from the Leave camp, former Conservative leader Iain Duncan Smith has said.

He told the BBC's Andrew Marr show that it would be "very difficult" for a public who voted to leave the EU to have a leader who had opposed this.

Prime Minister David Cameron announced on Friday that he will step down by October.

He had urged the country to vote Remain, but was defeated by 52% to 48%.

"The government itself now had a view... which was to remain and so now we need to change that position and actually deliver on this very clear mandate from the British people," Mr Duncan Smith said.

BBC.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-36633595)

Of course! But who would be willing to pick up the pieces, and above all, who would be trusted to actually do so? :-[

But... a "very clear mandate"? Hardly, with a 52/48 split and BREGRET unfolding!
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 05:18:59 PM
If this graph is near true, then the Brit "old gits" have really cheated on their children:

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/gra624_by_age.png)

Source: BBC.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/magazine-36619342)

The Telegraph (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2016/06/25/could-britain-actually-have-a-second-referendum-on-brexit/) devoted a long and detailed article to the possibilities of BREGRET. "It isn't over until it's over!" means Britain's membership will last at least until two years after notifying of article 50, it's intention to leave. Lots of things can happen till then... GB could even apply to join the EU later again.

There is also a good article in English on Spiegel.de (http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/britain-exit-may-not-be-such-a-disaster-for-the-eu-a-1099797.html) about the advantages for the EU, if Britain is actually leaving.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 26, 2016, 07:04:30 PM
Nigel Farage on May 16 to the Mirror (http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/nigel-farage-wants-second-referendum-7985017): “In a 52-48 referendum this would be unfinished business by a long way. If the remain campaign win two-thirds to one-third that ends it.” Sad, he doesn't want to hear of that threshold set by himself anymore. ;)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on June 27, 2016, 12:28:48 PM
I wonder how it will effect the British expats in thailand - here's a piece from ctvnews.ca (http://www.ctvnews.ca/world/british-expatriates-fear-for-their-future-after-u-k-vote-1.2962081)  Dawson, a 51-year-old Englishman who has lived in Spain since the 1990s, admits the decoupling of Britain from the EU other 27 member nations has him spooked.

His future is suddenly uncertain.

 "We're very scared because I've been here 23 years. I've got my house, my kids were born here, they went to a British-Spanish school, I've got a bar, I've got a lot to lose," Dawson said at his pub, which was decked out with the red-and-white English flags featuring the St. George's Cross.

EU leaders are due soon to begin unprecedented -- and knotty -- negotiations on how to extricate the U.K. from the bloc. Crucially for British expatriates, EU laws stipulate that the bloc's citizens have the same rights as those nationals in any other member nation.

Nobody is saying what the rights of Britons living in the EU might be in a future outside the bloc. Dawson worries about losing his entitlements in Spain, which is part of the EU.

"We don't know how we're going to be now," he said. "We might have no pension. We might have no medical. We may have to sell our properties. We've lived here for a lot of years. We don't know how it's going to affect us anymore."
Title: Re: Brexit - will the impact be shortlived
Post by: thaiga on June 27, 2016, 04:36:34 PM
Vote ructions shortlived, British tourists, expats say

British expats can see no immediate effects from Brexit. However, they say Thailand now may look a more appealing retirement option than Europe for those looking to retire outside their home country.

Simon Landy, vice-chairman of the British Chamber of Commerce Thailand, said Brexit may have an impact on Britons looking to retire outside of the UK. In that case, Thailand could be a good option. About 1.2 million British citizens live in the EU.

Thailand offers many things that appeal, such as a low cost of living. "The only real disadvantage is distance. So for people who are looking to spend several months or a year in a friendly, welcoming, warm climate, Thailand is very attractive," he said.

"Much will depend on the nature of the settlements which the UK makes with the EU,'' said Mr Landy, who is also executive chairman of Colliers International Thailand.

Justin Moseley, managing director of Consortium UK, said he is "delighted" by Brexit, citing the difference in culture, language and laws.

"We don't know exactly what's going to happen, but I don't think it would make much difference," said Mr Moseley, who has lived in Thailand for 23 years.

He added that while more Britons might come to Thailand to retire, he is "embarrassed about the behaviour of some of the people who retire here now".

George McLeod, a manager at PricewaterhouseCoopers, said one negative impact of Brexit will be the weakening of the pound, which fell to a 31-year-low against major currencies. However, the impact will be shortlived.

The negotiations over Britain's status in the EU would involve many checks and balances, and Britain would not isolate itself from its biggest trading partners.

Dominic Faulder, a foreign correspondent and author, said he didn't expect any significant effects of Brexit, apart from concerns that it would restrict the options of his children if they wanted to work in Europe.

full story bangkokpost.com (http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/general/1020765/vote-ructions-shortlived-british-tourists-expats-say)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 28, 2016, 08:55:34 AM
Britain got kicked out of the Euro Cup by Iceland 2:1, but worst is, that the fans who came had to pay 12% more for the beer needed after that, thanks to BREXIT vote's aftermath.

After 50 years S&P downgraded Britain from AAA to AA and set the outlook to negative, which means Britain will have it harder to borrow money they need to restructure their country.

Brits with Irish ancestry or born in Northern Ireland before 2005 are rushing to get Irish passports. Brits residing in EU countries also rush to apply for citizenship of those countries: British EU officials in Brussels applying for Belgian citizenship etc..

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIbVLrX6zIU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BIbVLrX6zIU#)

But as long as British politicians have not submitted their article 50 intend to leave the EU there is status quo, i. e. Britain still a member of the EU. Brit politicians now seem in no hurry to do what they promised their electorate (scared EU with).
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 28, 2016, 05:55:07 PM
Tax rises and spending cuts will be needed to deal with the "shock" to the UK economy caused by leaving the EU, Chancellor George Osborne has said.

"We are absolutely going to have to provide fiscal security to people, in other words we are going to have to show the country and the world that the country can live within its means."

Asked if that meant tax rises and spending cuts, he said: "Yes, absolutely. But that decision will come under a new prime minister - it's obviously not possible while the Conservative Party is having a leadership contest."

BBC.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-36647006)

Hopefully they do not start with the "old gits", making them liable by cutting their pensions first.  :-[
Title: Re: A Brexit won't happen in the end - Here's why
Post by: thaiga on June 29, 2016, 03:38:47 PM
The independent.co.uk. seems to think -  A Brexit won't happen in the end - Even though people voted for it - a few points (below) why they think it won't happen. Already many people who voted out are already feeling a bit betrayed as certain fundamental truths sink in. Most important to people is the value their homes, which is where most people’s wealth is stored.

Here are the reasons, in some sort of logical order, why Brexit won’t happen:

The margin for Leave was pretty small, in reality, and so the mandate is weak. Most countries have a constitutional convention that big changes have to command a two-thirds vote in a legislature or referendum, and this was nowhere near it. In the early 1970s, when Ted Heath took us in (without a referendum), the phrase used by him was that he needed the “full-hearted consent” of the British people to take such a momentous decision. It probably wasn’t there in 1971-72, but it certainly isn’t there now. Some Brexiteers are suffering profound regret, and we may as well acknowledge that, such is the gravity of the situation. They do not want to wait the many years, perhaps decades it will take for Brexit to be the better option for them and their families (ironically it is the young who have time on their side to enjoy the post-Brexit future, but I won’t press that point).

Voters don't actually get to decide

We live in a democracy where Parliament is sovereign. That means that only Parliament can give effect to the will of the people.   David Lammy's idea that Parliament can just ignore the referendum is going too far, but it is true that Parliament's job is to decide what to do next. So what shall we do next?

The EU has too much to lose

Whoever takes over from David Cameron will, as recent events show, be under intense pressure not to press the exit button and activate “Article 50”, which puts us more or less on the escalator out. He or she may well be tempted to go back to Brussels and ask for a better deal within the EU.

If they had any sense – and Angela Merkel does – the European leaders will see the danger of Brexit contagion and offer the British, and the wider Eurosceptic movement across Europe, something that recognises people’s concerns, meaning probably some brakes on migration. This, on top of what David Cameron managed to secure, could form the basis for a second referendum choice – Brexit or the “New Deal”. Of course the EU’s establishment should have given that to Mr Cameron in the first place, but, as they say, we are where we are. I notice this is basically the suggestion now being put about by Jeremy Hunt; it will gain a lot of support outside Ukip, I suspect.

Hardly any Tories want to leave - including Boris Johnson

It will be highly attractive for whoever does succeed David Cameron to be seen as the leader who at last settled the European issue to Britain's satisfaction for ever. Theresa May, after all, is a Remainer, albeit reluctant, so we see where her instincts lie. Boris Johnson, let us recall, also first advocated voting Leave as a way for Britain to go back and get a better deal in his earliest intervention in the campaign, just after he declared for Leave. I quote, then, from an article Boris wrote, published on 16 March (I’ve retained the stuff about the economy, which is also of interest: “There is only one way to get the change we need, and that is to vote to go, because all EU history shows that they only really listen to a population when it says No… It is time to seek a new relationship, in which we manage to extricate ourselves from most of the supranational elements.

“The people who run the various EU institutions – whom we like to ply with crass abuse – are, in my experience, principled and thoughtful officials… They just have a different view of the way Europe should be constructed. I would hope they would see a vote to leave as a challenge, not just to strike a new and harmonious relationship with Britain (in which those benefits could be retained) but to recover some of the competitiveness that the continent has lost in the last decades.”
Some of Boris’ Tory colleagues think he didn’t believe a word of what he was saying in the campaign, and that the whole thing was just a vehicle for his ambition. Hence, perhaps, his confused flip-flopping on whether he wants us in the Single Market.  If so, then one can see him executing an almighty U-turn in about six months’ time and recommending a Remain vote with him leading the opposite campaign to the one just gone. He has the shamelessness, ambition and dexterity to do just that, in true Churchillian style.

A general election will change everything

If there is a general election and Labour get in (strange as it may be) maybe with SNP and Lib Dem support, they will not want to apply to leave the EU formally without going back to Brussels for a deal. Indeed they would be quite desperate to do so and would claim the general election result gave them a mandate for that. We’d almost certainly have a second referendum then, and probably a narrow Remain win.

We all know that if there was a referendum on holding a second referendum, the people would be in favour of having another vote. It is certainly the general view in Parliament, and of course we now have the Scottish and Irish dimensions to the problem now crystallising, as well as economic realities. People want to think again, and the politicians have a duty to let them.

independent.co.uk (http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/brexit-wont-really-happen-second-referendum-markets-value-housing-pound-a7106996.html)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on June 30, 2016, 07:26:14 PM
Well, Boris Johnson has decided not to become PM, not to pick up the pieces, not to help putting the spirits he called back into the bottle.

Looks like banks have put daily limits on international transfers. Might be a problem for some expats to get their pensions over here. And it might cost more due to minimum fees.
Title: Re: Brexit protesters take to streets of London
Post by: thaiga on July 02, 2016, 04:04:50 PM
Brexit protesters take to streets of London

Crowds are set to march through London on Saturday in protest against Britain's vote to leave the EU, which has plunged the government into political turmoil and left the country deeply polarised.

Demonstrators plan to gather on Park Lane around 11am (5pm Thailand time) before making their way towards the Houses of Parliament, in the second show of public anger this week over the shock results of the referendum.

"We can prevent Brexit by refusing to accept the referendum as the final say and take our finger off the self-destruct button," said organiser Keiran MacDermott on the march's Facebook page.

"Let's not leave the next generation adrift... Let's march, let's protest, and let's stop Brexit."

Inside the halls of power, the favourites to succeed Prime Minister David Cameron in the ruling Conservative Party have been pushing for a delay in starting the process that will see Britain leave the 28-member European Union.

Contender Michael Gove said Friday he had "no expectation" that Article 50 -- the formal procedure for leaving the EU -- would be invoked this year, echoing similar comments from his frontrunner rival Theresa May.

But EU leaders have called for a swift divorce, fearful of the impact of Britain's uncertain future on economic growth and a potential domino effect in eurosceptic member states.

"The decision has been taken, it cannot be delayed and it cannot be cancelled," said French President Francois Hollande Friday, on the sidelines of Battle of the Somme centenary ceremonies.

A speedy Brexit "would avert all the uncertainties and instability, especially in the economic and financial domains," he said. "The faster it goes, the better it will be for them."

Last week's shock vote plunged financial markets into crisis, wiping trillions off equities around the world and sending the pound to its lowest point in more than three decades against the dollar.

Bank of England chief Mark Carney hinted on Thursday he could unleash monetary stimulus this summer, saying that the economic outlook had "deteriorated" since Britain voted to leave the EU.

In further signs of the fallout, the government warned it would likely abandon its promise to achieve a budget surplus by 2020, while no-frills airline EasyJet announced contingency plans to protect its European operations.

'Liars, liars'

The vote to leave the EU was deeply split. Voters in Scotland, Northern Ireland and the capital London backed remaining, while the 52% that chose to leave were largely from less affluent areas in England and Wales.

The narrow victory has triggered anger in Britain among those who wanted to remain in the EU and more than four million people have signed a petition calling for a second referendum.

Thousands gathered in London's Trafalgar Square on Tuesday, defying pouring rain to vent their anger at the result of the June 23 referendum as they marched towards Westminster.

"Liars, liars!" booing crowds shouted outside parliament, urging lawmakers to "do your job, vote it down!"

A poll for BBC's Newsnight programme found that 16% of voters think Britain will stay in the bloc, and 22% said they do not know if it will leave.

Home Secretary May, who is expected to take over from Cameron in September after signing up dozens of MPs to her campaign, has assured "Leave" supporters she will respect the result.

In the coming days, Conservative MPs will whittle down the candidates to two in a series of votes and the rivals will then tour the country to appeal to some 150,000 party members for their vote.

Gove, who torpedoed fellow anti-EU campaigner Boris Johnson's leadership hopes on Thursday, cast doubt on whether May could lead the country out of the EU after supporting a "Remain" vote.

"The best person to lead Britain out of the European Union is someone who argued to get Britain out of the European Union," he said.

"I will end free movement (of EU nationals), introduce an Australian-style points-based system for immigration, and bring numbers down."

Bangkokpost (http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/world/1025693/brexit-protesters-take-to-streets-of-london)
Title: Re: Brexit - Tens of thousands of Britons marched across the capital - video
Post by: thaiga on July 03, 2016, 01:05:48 PM
Tens of thousands of Britons marched across the capital on Saturday

From London, with love: tens of thousands rally against Brexit vote (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lqd-a_yf9DM#)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on July 04, 2016, 05:47:08 PM
Now Nigel Farage resigns as Ukip leader after 'achieving political ambition' of Brexit. The third time already! Anybody shedding tears?

And George Osborne wants to cut corporation tax to keep companies from leaving the island/sinking ship, presumably expecting the EU to praise him for doing just the opposite of what they're strongly enforcing and then give GB after Brexit best conditions for trade with the EU. What's wrong with British politicians? Did they all loose their minds? And will investors risk more investments upon such a "stabilizing", or better nonsensical, move, that can only lead to a tax raise again in future?

Though she is not supposed to interfere with politics, maybe the Queen should have a word now.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on July 05, 2016, 07:45:52 PM
Investors in Standard Life’s property funds have been told that they cannot withdraw their money, after the firm acted to stop a rush of withdrawals following the UK’s decision to leave the EU. (guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/business/2016/jul/04/standard-life-shuts-property-fund-post-brexit-withdrawals))

NEWSFLASH: Aviva, the savings and investment group, has suspended redemptions from its £1.8bn property fund.

It took the decision following the Brexit vote, which triggered a surge of requests from investors to pull their money out of its UK Property Trust. (guardian (https://www.theguardian.com/business/live/2016/jul/05/mark-carney-to-outline-bank-of-englands-brexit-stability-moves-business-live))

...and the Pound went down further!



Title: Re: Sterling falls to new low against the dollar in Asia trade
Post by: thaiga on July 06, 2016, 12:24:35 PM
Sterling falls to new low against the dollar in Asia trade

The pound has hit a new low in Asian trading as concerns about the UK's vote to leave the European Union continue to weigh on investor confidence.

It touched $1.2798 against the dollar on Wednesday, which is a 31-year low.

US government bond yields also fell to record lows as investors rushed to put money in perceived safe havens.

The falls follow decisions by fund managers, including Standard Life and Aviva, to stop investors withdrawing money from their UK property funds.

They said the high levels of uncertainty caused by the referendum had led to investors rushing to pull their money out.

Investor confidence was further undermined by the Bank of England's warning on Tuesday that there was evidence some of the risks it identified related to Brexit were already emerging.

Asian markets

Meanwhile, Asian stock markets are falling due to the renewed Brexit concerns.

Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 has dropped nearly 3% and the broader Topix has shed 2.6% as the yen, another safe haven investment, strengthened against the US dollar.

South Korea's Kospi fell 2% and Australia's S&P/ASX 200 index is down 1.4%.

Hong Kong's Hang Seng fell 1.9% and the Shanghai Composite is 0.4% lower.

Indonesia, India, Singapore, Malaysia and the Philippines stock markets are closed for holidays.

more here bbc.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/business-36721016)
Title: Re: Brexit wins - A female PM for the UK
Post by: thaiga on July 08, 2016, 12:11:21 PM
The UK's Home Secretary Theresa May has come out on top in the Conservative Party leadership contest, with 199 votes. Her victory was predicted in polls ahead of the second-round ballot.

A female PM for the UK: Gove eliminated from Conservative Party leadership race (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UuVm3-oepPU#)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on July 08, 2016, 04:55:58 PM
I wonder why Boris dropped out? There he was with the ball in front of an open goal and for some reason he just walked off the pitch.  There must be some scandal to be revealed.  Boris is well known for his womanizing but some politicians can get away with it.  Boris and Kennedy to name but two.  Whatever the scandal their political reputations are undamaged.  On the other hand Clinton could not survive a quick gobble.  I can only think that a photo exists of Boris in bed with two boys.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: KiwiCanadian on July 08, 2016, 05:35:21 PM
I wonder why Boris dropped out? There he was with the ball in front of an open goal and for some reason he just walked off the pitch.  There must be some scandal to be revealed.  Boris is well known for his womanizing but some politicians can get away with it.  Boris and Kennedy to name but two.  Whatever the scandal their political reputations are undamaged.  On the other hand Clinton could not survive a quick gobble.  I can only think that a photo exists of Boris in bed with two boys.

The rumor I heard was that his campaign manager (the link to Boris's money people) stabbed him in the back and decided to run himself, so Boris has no campaign money.
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on July 08, 2016, 06:04:00 PM
KC that rumor does not hold water. Boris has loads of money
Title: Re: Britain’s new leader May seen as more Merkel than Maggie
Post by: thaiga on July 13, 2016, 11:19:07 AM
Britain’s new leader May seen as more Merkel than Maggie

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10747/BritainMayandMerkel-a7308.jpg)

Within moments of Theresa May’s confirmation as the next prime minister of Britain, London tabloids and wags were comparing her to Britain’s “iron lady” of the 1980s, Margaret Thatcher. But those taking a closer look see more in common with Europe’s most powerful woman today: Germany’s “iron chancellor,” Angela Merkel.

Both women have a track record of cautious pragmatism. Merkel famously will sit on the fence on many issues waiting for consensus to build before she commits herself to whichever side is more likely to work. May demonstrated her own grasp of patient tactics, opting to stay on the policy sidelines during Britain’s bruising referendum on European Union membership — positioned in the middle, seemingly the best spot from which to take charge of a divided Conservative Party in the wake of David Cameron’s resignation.

“It’s often said that you cannot tell what Merkel thinks about an issue until the last moment, if even then. May seems to be similarly inscrutable. She waits for her moment,” said Hans Kundnani, a London-based foreign policy analyst at the German Marshall Fund think tank.

lots more here washingtonpost.com (https://www.washingtonpost.com/national/britains-new-leader-may-seen-as-more-merkel-than-maggie/2016/07/12/480f580c-485f-11e6-8dac-0c6e4accc5b1_story.html)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on July 14, 2016, 06:27:00 AM
Boris Johnson to be foreign secretary? What'll be the tune?

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10001/bojo.jpg)
Boris Johnson fretting a guitar behind the capo

Source (https://twitter.com/cushac/status/753351056323674116/photo/1)

Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: thaiga on July 14, 2016, 11:27:38 AM
While others come and go LARRY the cat stands firm

Post-Brexit stability at last as Larry the Cat remains at Number 10 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iWEfeUs4Cxw#)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Taman Tun on July 14, 2016, 03:36:47 PM
 I think Bo Jo is an excellent choice for Foreign Secretary.  He will definitely put Johnny Foreigner in his place. (no offence meant, Johnnie!)
Title: Re: Pensions for British elderly threatened if Brexit wins, warns British PM
Post by: Johnnie F. on July 14, 2016, 04:56:18 PM
It was definitely a very courageous move of Teresa May to assign him to that. He'll keep making the news.

A Short History of Boris Johnson Insulting Foreign Leaders (http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2016/07/boris-johnsons-foreign-strained-relations/491237/)
Title: Re: Brexit wins - In and Out: Team May - and of course Boris
Post by: thaiga on July 15, 2016, 01:02:00 PM
In and Out: Team May - and of course Boris who shrugs off Europe’s shock at top diplomatic job

ENGLAND: In and Out: Team May (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q6pGJdx-BXM#)

ENGLAND: Boris Johnson shrugs off Europe’s shock at top diplomatic job (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l-OeEa16t-o#)
Title: Re: Brexit may send EU 'down the drain'
Post by: thaiga on August 29, 2016, 12:04:26 PM
Brexit may send EU 'down the drain' - German vice chancellor

Germany's vice-chancellor has warned the future of the EU could be in doubt if the UK's exit is handled badly.

Sigmar Gabriel said the EU would go "down the drain" if other states followed Britain's lead and that the UK could not keep the "nice things" about Europe while taking no responsibility.

It comes as Theresa May summoned ministers for a meeting on Wednesday to discuss ideas for the UK's withdrawal.

Downing Street said Brexit was "top" of the prime minister's agenda.

But a report in The Sunday Times suggested her cabinet was split over leaving the single market.

The UK voted to leave the European Union in a referendum vote on 23 June.

Mr Gabriel, who is also economy minister in Germany's governing coalition and Chancellor Angela Merkel's deputy, told a news conference that as a result, the world now regarded Europe as an unstable continent.
'Deep trouble'

"Brexit is bad but it won't hurt us as much economically as some fear - it's more of a psychological problem and it's a huge problem politically," he said.

"If we organise Brexit in the wrong way, then we'll be in deep trouble, so now we need to make sure that we don't allow Britain to keep the nice things, so to speak, related to Europe while taking no responsibility."

Mrs Merkel has met a number of European leaders during the past week to prepare the ground for a September summit focused on the EU's future post-Brexit.

She has said remaining member states must listen to each other carefully and avoid rushing into policy decisions.

Meanwhile, Mrs May is due to begin drawing up blueprints for Brexit on Wednesday, when she hosts cabinet ministers at Chequers, the prime minister's country retreat in Buckinghamshire.

BBC political correspondent Chris Mason said Mrs May would hear different answers to the question "what does Brexit actually mean?" from around the cabinet table and in Parliament.

Trade talks

It comes as a new cross-party group called Open Britain was launched.

In a joint article for the group in the Sunday Times, three former ministers from the Conservatives, Labour and the Liberal Democrats accept that the free movement of people cannot continue, but they warn against "pulling up the drawbridge."

Mr Gabriel also said on Sunday that trade talks between the EU and the US had "de facto failed".

The plan - known as the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership or TTIP - aimed to remove or reduce a wide range of barriers to EU-US trade and investment.

However, the move has been controversial in many of countries involved, including Germany and the UK. Critics say TTIP is driven by big business and would be bad for jobs, consumers and the environment.

In 14 rounds of talks, the two sides had not agreed on a single common chapter out of 27 being discussed, Mr Gabriel said.

"In my opinion the negotiations with the United States have de facto failed, even though nobody is really admitting it," said Mr Gabriel.
'Don't submit'

He suggested Washington was angry about a deal the EU struck with Canada, because it contained elements the US does not want to see in the TTIP.

"We mustn't submit to the American proposals," said Mr Gabriel, who is head of Germany's centre-left Social Democratic Party, which is in coalition with Mrs Merkel's centre-right Christian Democratic Union.

The BBC's Andrew Walker said ending the negotiations would not be a decision for Mr Gabriel, as he is the leader of centre-left Social Democratic Party, which is in coalition with Mrs Merkel's centre-right Christian Democratic Union.

Nonetheless, Mr Gabriel is an important voice and his view that TTIP has in effect failed is a sign of just how much political difficulty it faces, our correspondent added.

He has also been forced to defend his actions after he flicked the middle finger to a group of right-wing protesters earlier this month.

Sigmar Gabriel said his only mistake was not using both hands, and told his critics to think about what they would do if faced with 12 "young, aggressive, swearing and ready-for-violence Nazis".

Mr Gabriel had been confronted by the hecklers in northern Germany.

bbc.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-37210138)
Title: Re: Brexit - It means getting the best deal for Britain
Post by: thaiga on September 09, 2016, 11:55:52 AM
Brexit minister already has team of 300 working on arranging Britain's exit from EU

British politicians returned to the Houses of Parliament Monday with the fallout from the decision to quit the European Union top of the agenda.

It was a baptism of fire for the MP (member of the parliament) David Davis, making his debut on the front benches as Theresa May's newly appointed Secretary of State for Exiting the EU, also known as the government's Brexit Minister.

In his first major speech as Brexit Secretary, Davis reiterated the message from Theresa May that there will be no attempt to stay in the EU by the back door, no attempt to delay, frustrate or thwart the will of the British people and no attempt to engineer a second referendum.

Instead, he told MPs that his newly set up department already has over 180 staff in London, plus the expertise of over 120 officials in Brussels, "and we are still growing rapidly with first class support from other government departments."

Davis said: "The people have spoken in the referendum and all of us, on both sides of the argument, must respect the result. That is a simple matter of democratic politics. Naturally, people want to know what Brexit will mean.

"Simply, it means the UK leaving the European Union. We will decide on our borders, our laws, and taxpayers' money.

"It means getting the best deal for Britain -- one that is unique to Britain and not an 'off the shelf' solution. This must mean controls on the numbers of people who come to Britain from Europe -- but also a positive outcome for those who wish to trade in goods and services."

But pro-remain politicians waiting to hear details of what Brexit means, were disappointed if they expected full details.

"Is that it," they shouted across the chamber of the House of Commons, protesting that Davis had failed to hand over more details.

During questions from MPs, Davis gave the strongest hint that a single market deal with Europe would be improbable if the EU demanded Britain giving up control of its borders as a condition.

Davis added: "Brexit is not about making the best of a bad job. It is about: place for Britain in the world. There will be new freedoms, new opportunities, and new horizons for this great country."

"We can create a more dynamic economy, a beacon for free trade across the world. We can create an immigration system that allows us to control numbers and encourage the brightest and the best to come to this country," he said.

full article news.xinhuanet.com (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2016-09/06/c_135664666.htm)
Title: Re: Brexit - It means getting the best deal for Britain
Post by: Johnnie F. on September 09, 2016, 04:26:27 PM
Instead, he told MPs that his newly set up department already has over 180 staff in London, plus the expertise of over 120 officials in Brussels, "and we are still growing rapidly with first class support from other government departments."

Target reached: It has created new jobs in government.
Title: Re: Brexit
Post by: thaiga on September 09, 2016, 11:39:39 PM
Can it get any worse

German exports plunge, fuelling slowdown fears (http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/world/1082196/german-exports-plunge-fuelling-slowdown-fears)
Title: Re: Brexit
Post by: Johnnie F. on September 10, 2016, 07:40:17 AM
Can it get any worse

German exports plunge, fuelling slowdown fears ([url]http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/world/1082196/german-exports-plunge-fuelling-slowdown-fears[/url])


That article must have been written by somebody who really understands viewing politics from all sides! :-[

Having the EU complain heavily about Germany's huge export surplus for years, now people see the whole world in danger, if it starts getting back into balance.
Title: Re: Brexit - we don't want to put a penny more into your kitty
Post by: thaiga on October 12, 2016, 02:51:33 PM
Who would have forecast all this when we moved here, the pound looks like it's found it's place at a steady 42 + at the moment  :( So guys looks like the 30 bht noodle stalls are on the menu if your from the uk.

UK 'may still have to pay into EU even after Brexit'

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10747/_91771736_mediaitem91771735.jpg)

Whitehall officials believe the UK may need to make big payments to the EU to secure preferential trading terms after Brexit, BBC Newsnight has learned.

During the EU referendum, Vote Leave claimed leaving the EU could save the UK £350m a week in contributions.

But an unnamed cabinet minister has told Newsnight that the UK may end up "paying quite a lot" of that money to secure access to the single market.

The government said it would not give a "running commentary" on negotiations.

The UK's contributions to the EU became one of the most contentious issues in the EU referendum campaign after Vote Leave pledged to repatriate £350m a week - its estimate of the UK's gross weekly contributions to the EU.

This is reduced by subsidies paid to the UK and by the UK budget rebate.

But a leading light in the Brexit campaign said they now expected the UK could still end up paying as much as £5bn a year into EU funds, in return for access to the single market.

This is roughly half of what the UK would have expected to contribute to the EU - estimated by the Office for Budget Responsibility to average around £9.6bn a year from 2015.

A senior official has described the prospect of continuing UK contributions to the EU as the "dog that hasn't barked" after Prime Minister Theresa May made no reference to the issue when she set out her red lines for her forthcoming EU negotiations last week.

full article bbc.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-37627308)
Title: Re: The Brexit - Commons vote to ratify Brexit deal likely
Post by: thaiga on October 19, 2016, 08:58:45 PM
Commons vote to ratify Brexit deal likely, says No 10

Downing Street has said it is "very likely" MPs will be able to vote on the final Brexit agreement reached between the UK and the European Union.

Number 10 confirmed the comment by a government lawyer in the High Court represented the "government's view".

The vote would take place after negotiations have taken place and with Brexit already triggered using Article 50 of the Lisbon Treaty.

Campaigners have been calling for a vote before Article 50 is triggered.

Open Britain, formerly the Remain campaign, said the government's comments were an "encouraging sign" but renewed calls for a debate and vote earlier in the process, before Article 50 begins two years of formal negotiations.

The UK is expected to leave the European Union in 2019.

Prime Minister Theresa May opposes a vote before Article 50, saying those calling for one are "trying to subvert" the outcome of June's referendum.

The issue is currently the subject of a landmark legal challenge, with the government defending what it says is its right to invoke Article 50 without Parliamentary approval.

It's the question pre-occupying many MPs as Britain prepares to leave the EU. What role will they have in shaping and approving the final withdrawal deal the UK reaches with Brussels? Theresa May plans to begin talks with the EU by the end of March and negotiations will last for two years.

The government's legal team have now clarified what they believe happens then.

James Eadie QC said it was "very likely" the UK and the EU would agree a new treaty that would have to be ratified by Parliament.

A law passed in 2010 gave MPs the power to block a treaty indefinitely. But in practice, would Parliament at that point derail the UK's withdrawal agreement with the EU?

David Pannick QC, acting for one of the claimants in the High Court case, said even if Parliament refused to approve the final Brexit deal, the UK would have to leave the EU anyway - with or without an agreement. That is why, he argued, parliament needed to vote before formal talks began.

Judges who heard the case said they would give their decision "as quickly as possible". An appeal to the Supreme Court later in the year is expected, whatever the outcome.

During the High Court hearing, government lawyer James Eadie QC moved on to what was likely to happen at the end of the negotiations, in 2019, saying: "The government view at the moment is it is very likely that any such agreement will be subject to ratification."

If this vote ends with MPs rejecting the Brexit deal, the UK would still leave the EU, Lord Pannick, who is acting for the campaigners challenging the government, told the court.

"Parliament cannot reverse the notification," he said.

The UK would either leave with no agreement or reach a new one, he said, adding: "But the new agreement cannot restore the rights that are irretrievably lost, and whether there is a new agreement is out of the hands of Parliament."

Labour's shadow Brexit secretary Sir Keir Starmer said: "A vote so late in the day would put MPs between a rock and a hard place. It would ask us to choose between a deal on the government's terms or leaving the European Union with no deal at all."

UK voters opted in favour of leaving the EU by 51.9% to 48.1% in a referendum in June.

bbc.com (http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-37691270)
Title: Re: The Brexit - Britain’s decision to leave is irreversible
Post by: thaiga on October 20, 2016, 01:46:59 PM
I see the euro is following suit, Bank Note Buying Rates @ 37.69 bangkokbank.com (http://www.bangkokbank.com/BangkokBank/WebServices/Rates/Pages/FX_Rates.aspx) today

Theresa May to tell EU's other leaders 'there will be no second referendum'

Theresa May is to warn her 27 fellow European Union leaders over a working dinner in Brussels that Britain’s decision to leave is irreversible and there can be no second referendum.

Thursday’s meeting of the European council will be the prime minister’s first opportunity to address the leaders of all the other member states since the UK voted to leave the European Union in June.

Donald Tusk, the European council president, has insisted Britain’s future relationship with the EU will not be on the formal agenda for the two-day meeting, but he will give May the opportunity to set out the “current state of affairs in the country” over coffee at the end of the meal.

A No 10 source said she would tell her fellow EU leaders: “The British people have made a decision and it’s right and proper that that decision is honoured. There will be no second referendum. The priority now has got to be looking to the future, and the relationship between the UK, once we leave”.

The source added that the prime minister would also seek to reassure the other member states, amid growing fears that Brexit could unleash political and economic instability in Britain and the rest of Europe.

“She wants the outcome at the end of this process to be a strong UK, as a partner of a strong EU,” the source said. “She doesn’t want the process of the UK leaving to be damaging for the rest of the EU. She wants it to be a smooth, constructive, orderly process.”

With speculation rife about how Britain plans to conduct the negotiations, Tusk wants to avoid a discussion and will not invite other EU leaders to respond. May’s remarks are down as an “any other business point”, underscoring that Britain is far down the priority list for the summit despite public interest in the issue.

British diplomats in Brussels have been pressing for preparatory talks before May launches article 50, the EU exit process, which she has promised by the end of March 2017. So far their entreaties have been rebuffed and EU diplomats insist the consensus on “no negotiations without notification” is intact.

All 27 member states will have to be ...

full article theguardian.com (https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/oct/20/theresa-may-to-tell-eus-other-leaders-there-will-be-no-second-referendum?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=195602&subid=20190052&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2_footer)
Title: Re: The Brexit - Hard Brexit would damage 'almost every sector' of UK economy
Post by: thaiga on November 28, 2016, 01:11:37 PM
Hard Brexit would damage 'almost every sector' of UK economy

Leaving the single market would be damaging to almost every sector of the British economy from manufacturing and energy to retail and financial services, according to a new report commissioned by an alliance of Tory, Labour and Liberal Democrat politicians trying to stop a hard Brexit.

The study, by the Centre for Economics and Business Research, found every major wealth-creating sector would be affected negatively, with manufacturing hit if there are tariff barriers to EU trade and the creative industries suffering a “body blow” if there were strict controls on immigration.

The report examines the consequences of leaving the single market in favour of a free trade agreement struck on a bespoke basis for individual industries.

Theresa May has hinted she favours this so-called “sectoral” approach but the CEBR report warns that “all major sectors are linked to the EU and could be harmed if the UK government sought a free trade agreement which prioritised some sectors over others”.

 The release of the report comes at a time of growing mobilisation among MPs and political figures trying to stop the UK heading for a clean break with the EU single market and customs union, which is favoured by the most Eurosceptic cabinet ministers and leading Brexit campaigners such as Michael Gove.

For the first time since the referendum, MPs from across the parties – Tory Anna Soubry, Chuka Umunna of Labour and Nick Clegg from the Liberal Democrats – will appear together at an Open Britain event, pushing for continued membership of the single market.

Soubry will accuse those backing of a sector-by-sector deal of pursing a “simplistic fantasy”.

more from the theguardian.com (https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2016/nov/28/hard-brexit-would-damage-almost-every-sector-of-uk-economy?utm_source=esp&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=GU+Today+main+NEW+H+categories&utm_term=201755&subid=20190052&CMP=EMCNEWEML6619I2)
Title: Re: The Brexit
Post by: Johnnie F. on March 18, 2018, 10:20:48 AM
And how's that Brexit going?


UK should consider remaining in EU beyond March 2019, Brexit committee proposes
Committee chairman Hilary Benn says Border issue ‘deeply concerning’

Britain should consider remaining in the European Union beyond March 2019 to allow more time to resolve issues such as the future of the Border, the House of Commons Brexit committee has proposed (https://www.irishtimes.com/news/world/uk/uk-should-consider-remaining-in-eu-beyond-march-2019-brexit-committee-proposes-1.3431458)(Irish Times)
Title: Re: The Brexit
Post by: Taman Tun on March 19, 2018, 12:34:30 PM
Johnnie, this is a far more controversial topic than Driving in Thailand.  I have no skin in the game as I Brexited many years ago.  However, if I were still in the UK I would definitely be a Brexiteer.  I do not like the idea of a Union of Socialist European States, just look what happened to the USSR.
Title: Re: The Brexit
Post by: Johnnie F. on March 24, 2018, 09:59:54 PM
Cambridge Analytica is now said to not only have meddled in the US elections but also in the brexit vote:

"In an exclusive interview, Brittany Kaiser, Cambridge Analytica’s business development director until two weeks ago, said the work with Leave.EU involved analysis of data provided by Ukip." (The Guardian] (https://www.theguardian.com/news/2018/mar/23/cambridge-analytica-misled-mps-over-work-for-leave-eu-says-ex-director-brittany-kaiser))

Title: Re: The Brexit
Post by: Taman Tun on March 26, 2018, 10:35:49 AM
Brexit, yawn
Title: Re: The Brexit
Post by: thaiga on March 26, 2018, 12:48:10 PM
that sure is a brexit meter t/t - it's broke - now lets try the brexit b/s meter - looks like they need a little hand ;)

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10747/bullshit-meter_eb259d37011843e4668228cdf4b0b26e.gif)
Title: Re: The Brexit - A year away Britons' views remain as entrenched as ever
Post by: thaiga on March 28, 2018, 04:54:22 PM
A year away from Brexit, Britons' views remain as entrenched as ever

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GREAT YARMOUTH, England - Leaning over the counter of his seafood stall in the English seaside town of Great Yarmouth, Darran Nichols-George says those still moaning about the British vote to leave the European Union need to stop complaining.

"At the end of the day we live in a democracy and therefore they've had the vote," said 51-year-old Nichols-George, peering over cartons of prawns, crabs, mussels and jellied eels.

"We voted out so we're going to go out."

The fishmonger was one of the 17.4 million Britons who voted to quit the EU in a 2016 referendum, giving the Brexit campaign victory over the 16.1 million voters who wanted to stay.

Since then, Brexit has never been far from the headlines, from difficult talks with the EU and leaks of government forecasts that Britain will be worse off, to fish dumped into the River Thames by fishermen angry at European quotas.

A year before Britain leaves the bloc in March 2019, allegations that the main campaign for leaving the EU broke the law have revived memories of the bitter referendum battle.

Despite the issue dominating discussions in parliament and the pages of newspapers, voters' views seem entrenched as ever.

"People now think of themselves as Leavers or Remainers and see developments from that perspective," Sara Hobolt, a professor of politics at the London School of Economics, told Reuters. She estimates that 80 to 90 percent of Britons have not changed their minds since 2016.

Some senior figures, such as former Prime Minister Tony Blair, have demanded a second referendum on the final deal agreed with the EU, so people could have a say in full knowledge of the possible outcome. But polls and research suggest there is no overwhelming support for another vote.

Even if there was another plebiscite, the surveys show Britons are still deeply divided and most would probably vote the same way.

"Tony Blair -- he should keep his snout out," said retired 68-year-old Michael Cutting, who voted Leave and has lived in Great Yarmouth his whole life.

His view is shared by many in the rundown holiday resort, a once bustling fishing port some 140 miles (200 km) northeast of London, where paint peels off windswept ferris wheels and mainly elderly visitors wander past its "Golden Mile" sandy beach and drab amusement arcades.

"NO MESSING AROUND"

Great Yarmouth has the country's lowest percentage of college graduates -- 14.2 percent -- and a high rate of unemployment. In 2016, 71.5 percent of votes cast here were for Leave, putting it in one of the top 10 Brexit-supporting areas in the country.

"I think we should all get out of [the EU] now, straight away, no messing around," said Philip Blake, 60, between chopping cuts of prime British beef for display at his family-run butchers.

"They're taking too long over it now. Just go. Hard Brexit, whatever, I don't mind."

While an EU flag flies in tatters beside Great Yarmouth's seaside promenade, in the affluent university city of Norwich just 21 miles (34 km) away, the sentiment about Europe could hardly be more different but the intransigence is the same.

"I hate it, I really do," said Gaye Sorah, 59, who was close to tears at the thought of Brexit. "One year to go, it’s a disaster. I just wish we could rewind the clock."

Norwich, where tourists wander between the market's stalls, chattering in a variety of tongues while students cycle down medieval cobbled streets, bucked the trend for the region with 56 percent of voters backing staying in the EU.

Pro-EU posters adorn the whole foods stall owned by Gareth Butcher, 69, and his 66-year-old wife Jane Wirgman, who proudly wears a "We are Europe" badge.

"I could see no advantage in leaving, particularly not on a dream of empires past," Butcher said. "I’ve not changed my mind at all and it's a source of some amusement to me that as the ramifications become clear ... that a lot of other people’s minds are being concentrated."

Expressions of such regret are hard to find, but dishing out bags of chunky fries from his van in Great Yarmouth, Robin Platten thinks he was wrong to vote to leave.

"I've been thinking maybe I might have made a mistake," Platten, 60, whose family have run the Brewer Chip Saloon takeaway stall in the town's market since 1902.

"It's a great big tunnel with no light at the end of it, as far as I'm concerned," he told Reuters. "I think maybe everybody should be given a second chance for the mistakes that they've made. But I don't think that's going to happen."

Even some voters who backed remain have no desire to see the process dragging on, however -- despite their continued misgivings.

"I think we may as well get on with it now," said Kathryn Fabian, 20, a student in Norwich. "I feel like we had our say back then, it's been decided. Let's just move on." REUTERS

todayonline.com (http://www.todayonline.com/world/year-away-brexit-britons-views-remain-entrenched-ever)
Title: Re: The Brexit - How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK
Post by: thaiga on August 03, 2018, 12:48:02 PM
How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK

How Brexit could end flights in and out the UK (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdVx6QrFqfM#)
Title: Re: The Brexit - How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK
Post by: Johnnie F. on August 03, 2018, 02:41:21 PM
How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK

How Brexit could end flights in and out the UK ([url]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DdVx6QrFqfM#[/url])


Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson would probably say: What do we need airtravel for? The British Empire has been great at sea. We can just invest in our fleet again!" 8)
Title: Re: The Brexit - Britain is so broken
Post by: thaiga on August 08, 2018, 02:28:55 PM
Harsh words spoken as the pound struggles to stay at the 40 mark :-[

In England's forgotten 'rust belt', voters show little sign of Brexit regret

(http://koratfart.com/gallery/albums/userpics/10747/1111.png)

Green, who runs a Miners’ Welfare Club in an area where there are no longer any working miners, says both of Britain’s main political parties have shown no interest in the Yorkshire town of Knottingley for generations.

“It’s desperate really - I feel that Knottingley is a forgotten community, and all the surrounding areas are forgotten communities as well, through lack of investment and red tape,” he said, standing in a youth boxing gym at the club.

The 55-year-old former railwayman is not alone. Such anger drove many Britons to vote to leave the European Union in 2016, though tumult in the Brexit process has prompted some supporters of EU membership to call for a rerun of the referendum.

full article reuters.com (https://www.reuters.com/article/uk-britain-eu-voters/in-englands-forgotten-rust-belt-voters-show-little-sign-of-brexit-regret-idUSKBN1KS0VM)
Title: Re: The Brexit - Risk of no-deal Brexit rising, everyone needs to prepare
Post by: thaiga on August 14, 2018, 08:53:41 PM
Risk of no-deal Brexit rising, 'everyone needs to prepare': British foreign minister

The risk of a no-deal Brexit has been increasing and the European Union commission needs to change its attitude if a deal is to be reached, British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt said on Tuesday.

"Everyone needs to prepare for the possibility of a chaotic no-deal Brexit," Hunt told reporters in Helsinki.

With less than eight months until Britain quits the EU, the government has yet to agree a divorce deal with Brussels and has stepped up planning for the possibility of leaving the bloc without any formal agreement.

"I think the risk of a no Brexit deal has been increasing recently ... there is absolutely no guarantee that we will get a deal," Hunt said after a meeting with his Finnish counterpart Timo Soini.

"But it's not what anyone wants and I hope very much that we'll find a way to avoid that ... the British government has been doing everything it can to avoid that outcome," he said.

"We do need to see a change in approach by the European Commission."

Both London and Brussels say they want to get a divorce deal at the Oct. 18 EU Council, but diplomats think that target date is too optimistic. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier rejected key elements of British Prime Minister Theresa May's new trade proposals last month.

Economists say a failure to agree the terms of the divorce would cause serious harm to the world's No.5 economy as trade with the EU, Britain's largest market, would become subject to tariffs.

Supporters of Brexit say there may be some short-term pain for the economy but that long-term it will prosper when cut free from the EU. Meanwhile, some lawmakers are pushing for a rerun of the 2016 referendum. REUTERS

todayonline.com (https://www.todayonline.com/world/risk-no-deal-brexit-rising-everyone-needs-prepare-british-foreign-minister)