Author Topic: The Brexit  (Read 15286 times)

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Offline thaiga

Hard Brexit would damage 'almost every sector' of UK economy

Leaving the single market would be damaging to almost every sector of the British economy from manufacturing and energy to retail and financial services, according to a new report commissioned by an alliance of Tory, Labour and Liberal Democrat politicians trying to stop a hard Brexit.

The study, by the Centre for Economics and Business Research, found every major wealth-creating sector would be affected negatively, with manufacturing hit if there are tariff barriers to EU trade and the creative industries suffering a “body blow” if there were strict controls on immigration.

The report examines the consequences of leaving the single market in favour of a free trade agreement struck on a bespoke basis for individual industries.

Theresa May has hinted she favours this so-called “sectoral” approach but the CEBR report warns that “all major sectors are linked to the EU and could be harmed if the UK government sought a free trade agreement which prioritised some sectors over others”.

 The release of the report comes at a time of growing mobilisation among MPs and political figures trying to stop the UK heading for a clean break with the EU single market and customs union, which is favoured by the most Eurosceptic cabinet ministers and leading Brexit campaigners such as Michael Gove.

For the first time since the referendum, MPs from across the parties – Tory Anna Soubry, Chuka Umunna of Labour and Nick Clegg from the Liberal Democrats – will appear together at an Open Britain event, pushing for continued membership of the single market.

Soubry will accuse those backing of a sector-by-sector deal of pursing a “simplistic fantasy”.

more from the theguardian.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 


Online Taman Tun

Re: The Brexit
« Reply #92 on: March 19, 2018, 12:34:30 PM »
Johnnie, this is a far more controversial topic than Driving in Thailand.  I have no skin in the game as I Brexited many years ago.  However, if I were still in the UK I would definitely be a Brexiteer.  I do not like the idea of a Union of Socialist European States, just look what happened to the USSR.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: The Brexit
« Reply #93 on: March 24, 2018, 09:59:54 PM »
Cambridge Analytica is now said to not only have meddled in the US elections but also in the brexit vote:

"In an exclusive interview, Brittany Kaiser, Cambridge Analytica’s business development director until two weeks ago, said the work with Leave.EU involved analysis of data provided by Ukip." (The Guardian])

Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: The Brexit
« Reply #94 on: March 26, 2018, 10:35:49 AM »
Brexit, yawn
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit
« Reply #95 on: March 26, 2018, 12:48:10 PM »
that sure is a brexit meter t/t - it's broke - now lets try the brexit b/s meter - looks like they need a little hand ;)

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

A year away from Brexit, Britons' views remain as entrenched as ever



GREAT YARMOUTH, England - Leaning over the counter of his seafood stall in the English seaside town of Great Yarmouth, Darran Nichols-George says those still moaning about the British vote to leave the European Union need to stop complaining.

"At the end of the day we live in a democracy and therefore they've had the vote," said 51-year-old Nichols-George, peering over cartons of prawns, crabs, mussels and jellied eels.

"We voted out so we're going to go out."

The fishmonger was one of the 17.4 million Britons who voted to quit the EU in a 2016 referendum, giving the Brexit campaign victory over the 16.1 million voters who wanted to stay.

Since then, Brexit has never been far from the headlines, from difficult talks with the EU and leaks of government forecasts that Britain will be worse off, to fish dumped into the River Thames by fishermen angry at European quotas.

A year before Britain leaves the bloc in March 2019, allegations that the main campaign for leaving the EU broke the law have revived memories of the bitter referendum battle.

Despite the issue dominating discussions in parliament and the pages of newspapers, voters' views seem entrenched as ever.

"People now think of themselves as Leavers or Remainers and see developments from that perspective," Sara Hobolt, a professor of politics at the London School of Economics, told Reuters. She estimates that 80 to 90 percent of Britons have not changed their minds since 2016.

Some senior figures, such as former Prime Minister Tony Blair, have demanded a second referendum on the final deal agreed with the EU, so people could have a say in full knowledge of the possible outcome. But polls and research suggest there is no overwhelming support for another vote.

Even if there was another plebiscite, the surveys show Britons are still deeply divided and most would probably vote the same way.

"Tony Blair -- he should keep his snout out," said retired 68-year-old Michael Cutting, who voted Leave and has lived in Great Yarmouth his whole life.

His view is shared by many in the rundown holiday resort, a once bustling fishing port some 140 miles (200 km) northeast of London, where paint peels off windswept ferris wheels and mainly elderly visitors wander past its "Golden Mile" sandy beach and drab amusement arcades.

"NO MESSING AROUND"

Great Yarmouth has the country's lowest percentage of college graduates -- 14.2 percent -- and a high rate of unemployment. In 2016, 71.5 percent of votes cast here were for Leave, putting it in one of the top 10 Brexit-supporting areas in the country.

"I think we should all get out of [the EU] now, straight away, no messing around," said Philip Blake, 60, between chopping cuts of prime British beef for display at his family-run butchers.

"They're taking too long over it now. Just go. Hard Brexit, whatever, I don't mind."

While an EU flag flies in tatters beside Great Yarmouth's seaside promenade, in the affluent university city of Norwich just 21 miles (34 km) away, the sentiment about Europe could hardly be more different but the intransigence is the same.

"I hate it, I really do," said Gaye Sorah, 59, who was close to tears at the thought of Brexit. "One year to go, it’s a disaster. I just wish we could rewind the clock."

Norwich, where tourists wander between the market's stalls, chattering in a variety of tongues while students cycle down medieval cobbled streets, bucked the trend for the region with 56 percent of voters backing staying in the EU.

Pro-EU posters adorn the whole foods stall owned by Gareth Butcher, 69, and his 66-year-old wife Jane Wirgman, who proudly wears a "We are Europe" badge.

"I could see no advantage in leaving, particularly not on a dream of empires past," Butcher said. "I’ve not changed my mind at all and it's a source of some amusement to me that as the ramifications become clear ... that a lot of other people’s minds are being concentrated."

Expressions of such regret are hard to find, but dishing out bags of chunky fries from his van in Great Yarmouth, Robin Platten thinks he was wrong to vote to leave.

"I've been thinking maybe I might have made a mistake," Platten, 60, whose family have run the Brewer Chip Saloon takeaway stall in the town's market since 1902.

"It's a great big tunnel with no light at the end of it, as far as I'm concerned," he told Reuters. "I think maybe everybody should be given a second chance for the mistakes that they've made. But I don't think that's going to happen."

Even some voters who backed remain have no desire to see the process dragging on, however -- despite their continued misgivings.

"I think we may as well get on with it now," said Kathryn Fabian, 20, a student in Norwich. "I feel like we had our say back then, it's been decided. Let's just move on." REUTERS

todayonline.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit - How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK
« Reply #97 on: August 03, 2018, 12:48:02 PM »
How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK

How Brexit could end flights in and out the UK
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: The Brexit - How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK
« Reply #98 on: August 03, 2018, 02:41:21 PM »
How Brexit could end flights in and out of the UK

How Brexit could end flights in and out the UK


Nigel Farage and Boris Johnson would probably say: What do we need airtravel for? The British Empire has been great at sea. We can just invest in our fleet again!" 8)
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit - Britain is so broken
« Reply #99 on: August 08, 2018, 02:28:55 PM »
Harsh words spoken as the pound struggles to stay at the 40 mark :-[

In England's forgotten 'rust belt', voters show little sign of Brexit regret



Green, who runs a Miners’ Welfare Club in an area where there are no longer any working miners, says both of Britain’s main political parties have shown no interest in the Yorkshire town of Knottingley for generations.

“It’s desperate really - I feel that Knottingley is a forgotten community, and all the surrounding areas are forgotten communities as well, through lack of investment and red tape,” he said, standing in a youth boxing gym at the club.

The 55-year-old former railwayman is not alone. Such anger drove many Britons to vote to leave the European Union in 2016, though tumult in the Brexit process has prompted some supporters of EU membership to call for a rerun of the referendum.

full article reuters.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit - Risk of no-deal Brexit rising, everyone needs to prepare
« Reply #100 on: August 14, 2018, 08:53:41 PM »
Risk of no-deal Brexit rising, 'everyone needs to prepare': British foreign minister

The risk of a no-deal Brexit has been increasing and the European Union commission needs to change its attitude if a deal is to be reached, British foreign minister Jeremy Hunt said on Tuesday.

"Everyone needs to prepare for the possibility of a chaotic no-deal Brexit," Hunt told reporters in Helsinki.

With less than eight months until Britain quits the EU, the government has yet to agree a divorce deal with Brussels and has stepped up planning for the possibility of leaving the bloc without any formal agreement.

"I think the risk of a no Brexit deal has been increasing recently ... there is absolutely no guarantee that we will get a deal," Hunt said after a meeting with his Finnish counterpart Timo Soini.

"But it's not what anyone wants and I hope very much that we'll find a way to avoid that ... the British government has been doing everything it can to avoid that outcome," he said.

"We do need to see a change in approach by the European Commission."

Both London and Brussels say they want to get a divorce deal at the Oct. 18 EU Council, but diplomats think that target date is too optimistic. EU Brexit negotiator Michel Barnier rejected key elements of British Prime Minister Theresa May's new trade proposals last month.

Economists say a failure to agree the terms of the divorce would cause serious harm to the world's No.5 economy as trade with the EU, Britain's largest market, would become subject to tariffs.

Supporters of Brexit say there may be some short-term pain for the economy but that long-term it will prosper when cut free from the EU. Meanwhile, some lawmakers are pushing for a rerun of the 2016 referendum. REUTERS

todayonline.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit - Brexit vote could 'in theory' be reversed
« Reply #101 on: August 21, 2018, 12:58:48 PM »
Brexit vote could 'in theory' be reversed: EU minister Moscovici

Britain's vote to leave the European Union could "in theory" be reversed although there is a still a strong probability it will go ahead, said the European Commissioner for Economic and Financial Affairs Pierre Moscovici on Monday.

Moscovici was replying on French radio to a question related to a move by the co-founder of fashion brand Superdry to donate a million pounds ($1.28 million) to the campaign for a referendum on the final Brexit agreement.

Asked whether the Brexit vote could be reversed, Moscovici told France Inter radio: "It is, in theory...it is up to the British themselves who have made the decision to leave, to decide ultimately if they will or not, and how they will do it."

"The probability of Brexit is nevertheless very strong because there has been a vote of the people, a referendum..." added Moscovici.

Asked if there would definitely be a deal between Britain and the European Union regarding the terms of Brexit, Moscovici also replied: "Not necessarily." REUTERS

todayonline.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit - £1 million donated to fund a second Brexit referendum
« Reply #102 on: August 21, 2018, 05:37:13 PM »
The cofounder of fashion brand Superdry is donating £1 million to fund a second Brexit referendum

The British millionaire founder of clothing brand Superdry is donating £1 million to a group trying to secure a second referendum on the UK's final Brexit deal.

Julian Dunkerton is donating the sum to campaign group the People's Vote, according to the Observer. The People's Vote is a campaign group set up in April 2018 calling for a vote on the final terms of Britain's exit from the EU. The group was set up by campaigners and MPs from across the political spectrum. It is led by Labour MP Chuka Umunna.

Dunkerton told the Observer: "I’m putting some of my money behind the People’s Vote campaign because we have a genuine chance to turn this around.

"It’s becoming clear there is no vision for Brexit and the politicians have made a mess of it. Increasingly, the public knows that Brexit is going to be a disaster. Maybe they just need to be given that little bit of hope that comes when they see how opinion is moving."

The deadline for Britain leaving the EU is March 2019 and it is looking increasingly likely that Britain will crash out of the bloc without any agreement on future trading relations. Britain's International Trade Secretary Liam Fox warned in recent weeks that the likelihood of a "no deal" scenario has risen to 60% and it emerged this week that the government is drawing up emergency plans for what to do if this is the case.

The People's Vote wants Brits to be given a vote on the final terms of Britain's exit from the EU, with the option to remain in the bloc if the public decides that the plan for leaving isn't good enough.

Dunkerton's donation will fund "one of the most detailed polling exercises ever undertaken by a campaign," he told the Observer. The polling will look at whether there is an appetite for a second vote across the UK. YouGov polling earlier this month found 45% of people support a People's Vote on the final deal, while 34% do not.

Dunkerton cofounded Superdry in Cheltenham, England, in 2003 and floated the business on the London stock exchange in 2010. Superdry has a market value of over £900 million and had sales of £752 million in 2017. Dunkerton left the business earlier this year but is still the largest single shareholder, with a stake of just over 18%. The Telegraph estimated his net worth earlier this year at £350 million.

Dunkerton told the Observer: "If Brexit had happened 20 years earlier, Superdry would never have become the global success that it did. We would have struggled to cope with negotiating customs and tariffs."

markets.businessinsider.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Newsy

Re: The Brexit UK: My Brexit plan or no plan
« Reply #103 on: September 18, 2018, 10:31:44 AM »
bangkokpost.com

UK: My Brexit plan or no plan

 British Prime Minister Theresa May insisted her Brexit plan was the only alternative to leaving the EU without an agreement -- something the IMF said Monday would inflict "substantial costs" on the UK economy.

Despite strong opposition in her Conservative party and criticism in Brussels, Mrs May has stuck by the so-called Chequers proposal to keep close trade ties with the European Union after Brexit on March 29 next year.

"The alternative to that will be not having a deal," she told the BBC in an interview out Monday

Mrs May will meet EU leaders in Salzburg on Wednesday and Thursday, as she seeks a breakthrough in talks on the Brexit divorce and the future UK-EU trading relationship.

The International Monetary Fund on Monday said Britain's economy would suffer "substantial costs" should it leave the EU without a deal.

Brussels and London have failed to resolve "fundamental" aspects of Brexit and this could leave London defaulting to World Trade Organization (WTO) tariffs, the IMF said in its annual outlook on the UK economy.

"Fundamental questions -- such as the future economic relationship between the two and the closely related question of the status of the land border with Ireland -- remain unanswered," it noted in a statement.

"Resolving these questions is critical to avoid a 'no-deal' Brexit on WTO terms that would entail substantial costs for the UK economy -- and to a lesser extent the EU economies -- particularly if it were to occur in a disorderly fashion," the IMF added.

Problems in parliament

The gloomy assessment contrasts with that of Mrs May, who indicated last week that a no-deal hard Brexit would not be a disaster for Britain.

Mrs May remains confident of striking an acceptable deal with Brussels.

But even if she gets an accord in the coming weeks, it must be signed off in parliament, where she can only muster a slender majority.

The main opposition Labour party's Brexit spokesman said Sunday that it could not back a deal unless it delivered the "exact same benefits" as Britain currently has inside the single market and customs union -- an unlikely prospect.

That would mean only a small number of Mrs May's Conservative MPs need to rebel in order to bring down her blueprint -- and plenty of hardcore Brexiteers are infuriated by it.

Mrs May expressed confidence parliament would approve the deal -- but warned there was no alternative if Britain wanted to avoid a "no deal" scenario.

"Do we really think... that if parliament was to say, 'No, go back and get a better one', do we really think the EU is going to give a better deal at that point?" she said.

Mrs May has proposed that Britain follow EU rules in trade in goods after Brexit, to protect manufacturing supply lines and avoid a "hard border" between Northern Ireland, part of the United Kingdom, and the Republic of Ireland.

Mrs May also insisted no other plan on the table would ensure "frictionless" trade on the island of Ireland.

Kurz: Avoid hard Brexit

But critics say her proposal would tie Britain too closely to the EU and argue that the Irish issue can be resolved through trusted trader schemes and the use of technology.

Former foreign minister Boris Johnson, who quit in July in protest at the Chequers plan, launched a fresh attack on it in his weekly newspaper column on Monday.

"The whole thing is a constitutional abomination," Mr Johnson, who has previously compared the plan to a "suicide vest", wrote in The Daily Telegraph.

Austria holds the EU's rotating presidency and Chancellor Sebastian Kurz said the EU should strain to strike a deal with London at the Salzburg summit.

"We have to do everything possible to avoid a hard Brexit and to make possible that there will be a strong cooperation between the UK and the European Union," Mr Kurz said Monday ahead of talks with French President Emmanuel Macron.

Mr Macron added that it was "essential that we find a deal, that the rules of cohesion and protection of Europe, of its single market, are fully preserved while the United Kingdom respects the vote by its people".
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Brexit - Don't rip Britain apart
« Reply #104 on: September 20, 2018, 07:00:02 PM »
Don't rip Britain apart, May appeals to fellow EU leaders on Brexit

Prime Minister Theresa May appealed directly to fellow European leaders on Wednesday to drop "unacceptable" Brexit demands that she said could rip Britain apart, and urged the bloc to respond in kind to her "serious and workable" plan.

Over Wiener schnitzel in Salzburg, Mrs May tried to win over the leaders of the European Union by effectively asking them what they would do if they were asked to agree a "legal separation" of their countries - something she says the EU is asking for by insisting Northern Ireland might stay under EU economic rules.

It may be a high-risk strategy. EU officials again said Britain had to move its own position over what has become known as the Irish backstop - how to avoid erecting border posts between the British province and EU member Ireland - as well as on future economic cooperation after Brexit day in March.

A government source suggested Britain would come up with other proposals to try to reach agreement on Northern Ireland "in due course", but Mrs May has so far been reluctant to move from her Chequers plan, hashed out at her country home in July.

With just over six months to Brexit day, both sides agree on one point - that time is running out to secure a deal that will mark Britain's biggest policy shift in almost half a century.

"I believe that I have put forward serious and workable proposals. We will of course not agree on every detail, but I hope that you will respond in kind," she told the other leaders at the Felsenreitschule theatre -- known to film fans for a scene in the musical 'The Sound of Music'.

"The onus is now on all of us to get this deal done," she said, according to the senior British government source.

BORDER PLAN "NOT CREDIBLE"

The talks, which have gone on for over a year, are bogged down in how to ensure that what will become Britain's only land border with the EU, between Northern Ireland and Ireland, will not become home again to the checks and tensions of the past.

Mrs May has rejected an EU proposal to keep the province in a customs union with the bloc if they fail to reach a deal to keep the entire EU-UK border open, instead offering a time-limited customs arrangement that would cover the whole of Britain.

Over dinner, she said the problem could be solved by securing the type of "frictionless trade" envisaged in her Chequers plan, and that Britain was still committed to agreeing a fall-back scheme with the EU.

"However, the Commission's proposal for this protocol - that I should assent to a legal separation of the United Kingdom into two customs territories - is not credible," she said.

Mrs May has shown little sign of moving away from her Brexit plan, shrugging off criticism not only from Brussels but also at home over her proposals for future trade relations and Northern Ireland.

She may have little option. Facing the annual Conservative Party conference later this month, she is keen to show hardline Brexiters who have called on her to "chuck Chequers" that her plan is the only one that can be negotiated with the EU.

And, possibly for that audience, she told the EU leaders that although time was short, "delaying or extending these negotiations is not an option" and rule out the option of a second referendum on Britain's EU membership.

EU officials are minded not to paint Mrs May into a corner, aware of the increasing opposition to her plans in her Conservative Party, and that she needs a victory of sorts to persuade a reluctant parliament to back a deal.

But while they were keen to emphasise the positive movement seen in the Chequers plan, some said no deal could be reached until there was movement from Britain on Northern Ireland.

REUTERS

full article: businesstimes.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Newsy

Pound sinks as May sticks to Brexit guns
« Reply #105 on: September 22, 2018, 11:52:09 AM »
bangkokpost.com

Pound sinks as May sticks to Brexit guns

The pound dropped the most since November after British Prime Minister Theresa May warned on Friday that Brexit negotiations were at an impasse.

Sterling fell below US$1.31 as May said the UK and European Union were a long way apart on two big issues and reiterated that no deal was better than a bad deal.

Friday’s newspaper front pages in Britain talked of May’s “humiliation” at the Salzburg summit of EU leaders, 10 days ahead of the annual Conservative Party conference where she will face intense scrutiny.

May on Friday hit back at the EU for flatly rejecting her Brexit plans, accusing the bloc of failing to treat the UK with respect, as the stalemate in negotiations deepened.

The prime minister revived a warning that no deal is better than a bad deal, a day after EU leaders bluntly told her that her blueprint for the divorce won’t work.

In a statement in London, a day after EU leaders used their meeting to tell her that her approach won’t work, May told them it was “not acceptable to simply reject” her plan.

On Wednesday, May was left looking isolated after leaders told her to rework her plans, and set her a deadline of next month to come back with new ideas. British officials had been hoping for warmer words from European leaders at the Austrian event -- to bolster May as she prepares for her party’s conference.

“Throughout this process I have treated the EU with nothing but respect. The UK expects the same. A good relationship at the end of this process depends on it” and “at this late stage in the negotiations it’s not acceptable to simply reject the other side’s proposals without a detailed explanation and counter proposals,” she said at her 10 Downing Street residence on Friday.

The prime minister said in March that she wouldn’t be “buffeted” by calls to walk away from talks, but as the tone of negotiations deteriorated on Thursday, she hinted that she might have changed her mind. She said the UK would continue to prepare for a no deal exit.

The pound dropped as much as 1.4% against the dollar as May spoke, the most on a closing basis since November. It was trading 1.3% lower at 1.3095 at mid-afternoon in London.

Britain is due to leave the EU in March, with or without a deal. If there’s no divorce agreement, there will be no transition -- a two-year grace period designed to prevent the country and its businesses tumbling into a legal limbo.

“May seems willing to call the EU’s bluff here, sticking to her guns,” said Valentin Marinov, head of Group-of-10 foreign-exchange research at Credit Agricole. “Trading the pound off the Brexit headlines has been plagued by fatigue in recent days, and we may see a bit of revival in the downside pound hedges.”
 
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Offline Johnnie F.

Re: The Brexit
« Reply #106 on: September 22, 2018, 02:10:27 PM »
Looks like PM May still doesn't understand the impact of her "plan to be respected" on the EU member Ireland with the only land border to the UK, and that the 27 EU countries just stick to each other on that point. Is it just the problem of not letting a colony go (back) to their own culture and rules? Probably she won't last very much longer as PM. Might be good for the UK!
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: The Brexit
« Reply #107 on: September 22, 2018, 02:39:33 PM »
Yes, would be good if she were replaced as PM.  She did something to redeem herself yesterday but it was too little and too late.  The trouble with May is that she is so suburban.  The country needs a true Brexit believing PM to carry out its democratic wishes.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

 



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