Author Topic: Margaret Thatcher  (Read 16369 times)

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sicho

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #60 on: April 14, 2013, 06:54:42 PM »
The outcry ay her death is unprecedented and shows the strength of feeling against her that exists even today. The demonstrators are only the tip of the iceberg.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #61 on: April 14, 2013, 07:41:32 PM »
Saf. I agree. So is the MT 'secret' for receiving her adulation, when, one has cocked up NEARLY everything else and one is losing support with the electorate - FIGHT A WAR ! That's an original talent - I do wish !
TT as I suggested before, she SHOULD have a statue, and it should be on the top of Canary Wharf. (About 2" high).
As for Yamoo - I don't think I have ever heard a more bizarre suggestion about anything at all, in all my life.
Happy Songkran to all !

 

sicho

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #62 on: April 14, 2013, 08:00:00 PM »
The common enemy - George Orwell 1984.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #63 on: April 14, 2013, 08:11:01 PM »
Her Death doesn't matter so much more than anyone else's.
Sorry for the Old Gal - she who tried so hard. But she messed up.
I don't suppose she meant harm but she did do harm.
IMHO
 

Offline thaiga

Re: thatcher is dead lets do the conga ♦ video
« Reply #64 on: April 14, 2013, 08:49:15 PM »
Thatcher: Conga in Glasgow to mark hated legacy

About 12 protesters attempted a conga while chanting “Maggie, Maggie, Maggie, dead, dead, dead”. Most were under 30, if not 25. Why come to celebrate the death of a woman who lost power before you were born?

http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/top-stories/thatcher-conga-in-glasgow-to-mark-hated-legacy-1-2894386


THATCHER IS DEAD : LET'S DO THE CONGA : GLASGOW 8/4/13 george sq.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

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Re: thatcher is dead lets do the conga ♦ video
« Reply #65 on: April 15, 2013, 06:51:35 AM »
Thatcher: Conga in Glasgow to mark hated legacy

About 12 protesters attempted a conga while chanting “Maggie, Maggie, Maggie, dead, dead, dead”. Most were under 30, if not 25. Why come to celebrate the death of a woman who lost power before you were born?

http://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/top-stories/thatcher-conga-in-glasgow-to-mark-hated-legacy-1-2894386


THATCHER IS DEAD : LET'S DO THE CONGA : GLASGOW 8/4/13 george sq.


Perhaps their families still suffer from what she did. Perhaps they are politically and economically knowledgable and can see the damage that she did.

She was so engrossed in pleasing her boyfriend Reagan and doing the bidding of her masters that she lost sight of the needs of the people.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Margaret Thatcher's funeral
« Reply #66 on: April 17, 2013, 11:18:11 PM »
coverage from today's events in central London


Another great image from Goldthorpe: the horse drawn hearse carrying the effigy and a coffin pass Goldthorpe Union Jack Memorial club. Photograph: John Giles/PA


An effigy of Margaret Thatcher in a 'coffin' is burnt together with a sofa as people gather to celebrate her death in Goldthorpe, northern England. Photograph: Andrew Yates/AFP/Getty Images


Another country, another wake: locals at Danderhall Miners Club Scotland hold a celebration party to mark the funeral of Lady Thatcher. Photograph: David Cheskin/PA


Dame Shirley Bassey leaves the reception held at the Guildhall this afternoon. Photograph: Matthew Lloyd/Getty Images


Carol Thatcher, Marco Grass, Sarah Thatcher, Mark Thatcher, Michael Thatcher and Amanda Thatcher watch the coffin depart from St Paul's. Photograph: Tim Rooke/Rex Features


Mark Thatcher walks behind the coffin of his mother as it leaves St Paul's Cathedral. Photograph: Toby Melville/Reuters


A protester's banner in the Strand, outside the Royal Courts of Justice. Photograph: David Levene for the Guardian.


David Cameron gives a reading next to the coffin during Lady Thatcher's funeral service. Photograph: Christopher Furlong/Getty Images


Demonstrators turn their backs as the funeral procession of the former prime minister Margaret Thatcher travels towards St Paul's Cathedral. Photograph: Paul Hackett/Reuters


Miners arrive at Easington colliery club for today's gathering as the funeral of Lady Thatcher takes place. Photograph: Owen Humphreys/PA


Another view of the cortege passing along Fleet Street towards St Paul's. Photograph: Michael Regan/Getty Images


A protester holds a sign at Trafalgar Square. Photograph: Jordan Mansfield/Getty Images

and lots lots more here

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Offline Roger

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #67 on: April 19, 2013, 02:56:34 PM »
Taman Tun - As much as we disagreed about MT - I just wanted to say that I was pleased that her Funeral went as planned.
For the most part, the Protestors behaved in dignified manner. To their credit. Thankfully earlier fears were largely unfounded.
Perhaps young Cameron can now get stuck in and sort out the good ole' UK now.
ATB
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #68 on: April 19, 2013, 07:10:11 PM »
Yes Roger, glad there were no major disturbances.  Unfortunately I do not hold out much hope for great things from Mr. Cameron.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: McLoughlin hits back at Margaret Thatcher critics
« Reply #69 on: April 19, 2013, 07:11:23 PM »
Former miner turned Cabinet minister Patrick McLoughlin hits back at Margaret Thatcher critics

A Conservative Cabinet minister who refused to go on strike when he was working as a miner in 1984 has hit back at critics of Baroness Thatcher.


Margaret Thatcher’s first visit underground to a coalface at Moorgreen Colliery in Nottinghamshire

Patrick McLoughlin, the Transport secretary, told The Daily Telegraph: “I was there. I worked through it. And much of what is being said now just isn’t true.”

Mr McLoughlin said he wanted to tackle the distortion of the facts around the 1984 miners’ strike, when pit workers clashed with police during a longer period of protest against a major mines closure programme, did so much to define Margaret Thatcher’s premiership.

Earlier this week, as tens of thousands of people gathered in London to mark Baroness Thatcher’s funeral, former miners in Yorkshire burnt her effigy to and staged a march in a 'celebration' of her death.

He said: “As a cabinet minister now and a miner in the 1980s, I have been listening to the debate about Baroness Thatcher with particular interest.

“Words like ‘divisive’ have been flung about. The miners’ strike has been laid at her door. Well I was there. I worked through it. And much of what is being said now just isn’t true.”

Mr McLoughlin, a member of the National Union of Mineworkers at the time, continued: “I was a pit worker among 1,600 others at Littleton Colliery in Staffordshire, part of what was then called the Western Region of the National Coal Board.

“I was a member of the Conservative Party and stood in Wolverhampton South East in 1983. I was also a member of the National Union of Miners when Arthur Scargill became leader the year before. And he knew that many working miners weren’t with him.”

Mr McLoughlin continued: “Scargill wasn’t interested in listening to the voice of his members and he tried to get round the ballots. It was Scargill, not Margaret Thatcher, who drove the divisions that followed the miners’ strike, by ignoring the miners’ democratic rights.

“Mrs Thatcher was not willing to cede to non-balloted strikes and, as with so many occasions when she stood her ground, she was absolutely right.

“As she herself said of the matter: ‘there are those who are using violence and intimidation to impose their will on others who do not want it ... the rule of law must prevail over the rule of the mob’.”

The Cabinet minister told how at “Littleton colliery, initially only around 20 of us kept on working though many, many more had voted against action.

“They were torn between what the union bosses wanted to do and what they thought was right. We kept the pit open, even if it sometimes it almost felt like we were bringing a lump each up ourselves.

“But despite the flying pickets, the number of working miners grew. We wanted the industry to thrive. It wasn’t a political game.”

Mr McLoughlin also criticised Labour failing to criticise the strike at the time.

He said: So be careful when people who weren’t there at the time tell you confidently of how a divisive Thatcher caused a strike that scarred communities across the midlands and the north.

“It wasn’t Mrs Thatcher who imposed a strike without a democratic mandate. Nor was it Mrs Thatcher who bit her tongue while that non-balloted strike took place and miners who wanted to continue to work were prevented from doing so.

“Yes, everyone agrees that the miners’ strike was a terrible and divisive period. But let’s be clear where the responsibility lies.”

source
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Offline thaiga

Re: Does David Cameron have the stomach for a fight like Lady Thatcher
« Reply #70 on: April 20, 2013, 11:29:44 AM »
Does David Cameron have the stomach for a fight like Lady Thatcher did?

Downing Street says the Prime Minister, David Cameron, is offering a Thatcherite vision of a better Britain

Sometimes in politics, numbers speak more eloquently than any words. Those figures are not a grid reference, yet they point to the central issue in Conservative Party politics after Margaret Thatcher. They also describe the struggle facing the man trying to fill her shoes.

The first three numbers are the share of the vote Baroness Thatcher took in the general elections she fought as Conservative leader, in 1979, 1983 and 1987. The last, smaller, figure is Mr Cameron’s score in 2010. The difference forced him into coalition with the Liberal Democrats.

What were the components of Lady Thatcher’s victories? And can Mr Cameron ever hope to reassemble all the pieces of the puzzle and build something not seen since 1997 – an all-Conservative Government?

It’s possible, of course, that the task is actually impossible. Some analysts believe that Thatcher-scale victories can now never be replicated, that the two-party system is broken, that voters’ affinity with traditional parties is in terminal decline. No one directing the Conservative campaign will accept that argument in public, but their strategy reveals a tacit acceptance of the difficulty of winning really big majorities in the current climate.

The Conservatives now have 304 seats, some 22 short of a simple Commons majority. Their target list of potential gains has only 40 entries. Winning every one would give Mr Cameron a working majority of less than 40; senior strategists say even a majority in single figures would be a “champagne moment”.

lots more


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Offline Roger

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #71 on: April 20, 2013, 02:08:44 PM »
MT was able to go for one target at a time. But DC had the whole darn shebang to sort out - all at once ! Probably fair to say MT would have acted more strongly and sooner as the DT suggests.
My view is that Cameron and Osborne have flunked duty already - by tiptoeing around benefit cuts and fiscal policy for so long - they should have been very tough, very quick.
Now they've lost support, having opted for death by 1000 cuts and Government borrowing is still rising. Some meaningful savings and benefit cuts are emerging at last - but it's too late.
Cameron will not, (and probably cannot), be bold unless the markets force him to be so. And that might happen !

 

Online Taman Tun

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #72 on: April 20, 2013, 04:21:34 PM »
The trouble is that it is a Coalition and the Lib Dumbs will always stand in the way of decisive action.  Maybe the only way forward is to fold the Coalition, and let Labour get re-elected.  They can then be held responsible for sorting out the mess that they created.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #73 on: April 20, 2013, 06:47:56 PM »
I agree - Lib dumbs - very cruel. Maybe we should have had another election after 3 months.
If Labour get in next time - they should leave in place all benefit cuts, cut Corporation Tax, introduce higher rates of income Tax etc.
Should they get in, (I think it unlikely), by that time the Economy will be buried in a corner - they will have to be tough. Market forces will demand it.
And the Euro will have been rejigged somehow by then.
If elected, Labour will have a mess to sort out, largely created by them as you say, but not tackled effectively by the Tory led coalition over  a 5 year period.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: David Cameron gives backing to £15million Thatcher museum
« Reply #74 on: April 21, 2013, 12:45:31 PM »
David Cameron has given his backing to the £15million museum and library which is planned as a permanent memorial to Margaret Thatcher.

The Prime Minister said the ambitious project, to be modelled on the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library and Museum in California, would “ensure [Lady Thatcher’s] legacy lives on”.

His public backing is likely to boost support significantly from other ministers and leading figures for the Margaret Thatcher Library, to be based in or close to Westminster, and which will run training courses and exchange programmes with overseas students.

It will also house artefacts from her time in power - 1979 to 1990 - likely to include a selection of her suits and handbags.

Mr Cameron said: “During her life Margaret Thatcher believed in action - and this memorial will produce real results for generations to come.

“I am delighted that young people will be able to come to the Thatcher Centre and learn about her achievements, and ensure her legacy lives on.”

As fundraising got seriously under way, the project, first revealed by The Sunday Telegraph last week, also received support from leading conservative figures from overseas - including John Howard, the former Australian prime minister, Newt Gingrich, the former speaker of the House of Representatives in the US, Fred Ryan, President Reagan’s chief of staff and Karl Rove, who performed the same role for President George W Bush.

Mr Rove said: “Baroness Thatcher championed freedom around the world and was a strong friend of America in the dangerous days of the Cold War. The Margaret Thatcher Centre will be a timeless tribute to her fighting spirit, unwavering courage, and principled conservative leadership.”

Meanwhile, an opinion poll today shows Conservative activists are more likely to characterise Mr Cameron as the “heir to [Tony] Blair” than the “heir to Thatcher.”

In the survey by the ConservativeHome website, 34 per cent of party members said the Prime Minister was the heir to Mr Blair, with only 11 per cent allying him with Lady Thatcher. Most, however, (55 per cent) said he was following his own individual path.

telegraph.co.uk
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #75 on: April 21, 2013, 02:58:23 PM »
Why not use that money for setting up a "Margaret Thatcher Social Foundation for Unemployed Industrial Workers" or similar? I bet a lot of people would rather starve than accept support from a foundation named after her.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #76 on: April 21, 2013, 04:48:44 PM »
Johnnie what would be the purpose of a MTSFUIW?  Maybe it would just keep people in perpetual idleness at the expense of others.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #77 on: April 21, 2013, 07:05:28 PM »
Maybe it would raise pride among the underprivileged, not to accept help, if it was associated with MT's name.

Rarebird-"Sympathy" music video


And when you climb into your bed tonight
And when you lock and bolt the door
Just think of those out in the cold and dark
'Cause there's not enough love to go 'round

And sympathy is what we need my friend
And sympathy is what we need
And sympathy is what we need my friend
'Cause there's not enough love to go 'round
No, there's not enough love to go 'round

Now half the world hates the other half
And half the world has all the food
And half the world lies down and quietly starves
'Cause there's not enough love to go 'round

And sympathy is what we need my friend
And sympathy is what we need
And sympathy is what we need my friend
'Cause there's not enough love to go 'round
No, there's not enough love to go 'round
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: After Margaret Thatcher, who's next?
« Reply #78 on: April 21, 2013, 09:05:36 PM »
After watching the BBC’s coverage of Lady Thatcher’s funeral, I’ve been wondering how they’ll handle Nelson Mandela’s inevitable demise

Now that’s all over, I wonder who’s next for the big send-off?

Sad to say, Margaret Thatcher’s old mate Mikhail Gorbachev, who coined the Iron Lady moniker she revelled in, must be a front-runner to follow his heroine through the Pearly Gates some time soon.

Gorby, the only recognisably human Russian politician of his generation – or any other generation – who helped destroy Soviet communism from within, was judged to be too ill to attend Lady T’s funeral. He’s 82 and has recently undergone operations on his heart, spine and prostate.

Doesn’t sound good, does it?

There aren’t many other Cold War warriors who strode the world stage alongside Maggie left alive now.

Cuba’s wrinkly old retired revolutionary Fidel Castro is 86 and looking it.

Fidel recently handed over the family dictatorship business to his 81-year-old kid brother Raul. Surely he can’t go on much longer? In the past few years he’s been patched up more often than one of those ancient Chevys you see puttering around the streets of Havana.

If I were a betting man, though, my money would be on Nelson Mandela. He’s 94 and not at all well, either.

Jacob Zuma, South Africa’s current flaky and frightening president, has urged the nation to pray for him.

Which sounds worryingly like the kiss of death.

After watching the BBC’s coverage of Lady Thatcher’s funeral, I’ve been wondering how they’ll handle Mandela’s inevitable demise.

They’ll fly about 200 staff to Cape Town, headed by the Grand Wizard of World Affairs John Simpson, supported by David Dimbleby, Huw Edwards, Fearne Cotton, Billy Bragg and those two muppets from The One Show. Everyone will wear black, obviously.

On Wednesday the BBC could hardly wait to cut away from the funeral procession to show some sensitive souls in a former mining village in Yorkshire dancing about and setting fire to an effigy of the dead woman. Charming.

Do you imagine they’d be so quick to turn the spotlight on a bunch of white South African nutters out in Biltongsdorp swigging champagne to celebrate Mandela’s passing and reminding interviewers he once founded a terrorist organisation called Spear of the Nation which led a murderous bombing campaign against government targets?

I’m guessing not.

Earlier, they’d managed to find a sour-faced woman who said she’d been a class milk-monitor when Lady Thatcher was Education Secretary and had cut free school milk. She’d been reduced to tears because her classmates had blamed this inhuman punishment on HER.

I didn’t know whether to laugh or cry.

Laugh, I decided.

source

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Posters of Margaret Thatcher banned on London Underground
« Reply #79 on: April 25, 2013, 06:36:02 PM »
Iron Lady exhibition hits the rails: Posters of Margaret Thatcher banned on London Underground

Posters featuring Margaret Thatcher that were due to be displayed at Westminster Tube station have been banned by advertising bosses.


Regal pose: Margaret Thatcher as Queen Victoria in one of the posters (Picture: Peter Kennard)

The late prime minister was to appear in six portraits that first ran in an exhibition at Gallery Different in central London, which opened on the day of Lady Thatcher’s funeral last Wednesday.

CBS Outdoor, which sells advertising space on the London Underground, said using the images would breach Transport for London (TfL) guidelines.

One poster features the late Tory leader as Queen Victoria and another, an alternative take on Peter Paul Ruben’s The Assumption of the Virgin Mary, replacing Mary’s face with Mrs Thatcher’s.

Westminster station is the closet to the Houses of Parliament.


Pastiche: Margaret Thatcher’s face replaces the Virgin Mary (Picture: Ben Moore)

A CBS Outdoor spokeswoman told the BBC: ‘If an advert has messages or images that relate to public controversy or sensitivity it will not be run.’

The advert was not been referred to the independent regulator, the Advertising Standards Authority, she added.

CBS Outdoor said it reserves the right to refuse a poster design without providing specific reasons under its copy approval policy.

‘CBS Outdoor will endeavour to refer to the guidelines laid down by our franchise partners who include London Underground, London Buses and all of our other bus, rail and tram franchises,’ she added.

TfL said the decision had been CBS Outdoor’s.

‘Our advertising contractor took the view that it could have been considered insensitive to have displayed the posters at the time of Baroness Thatcher’s funeral,’ it added.

‘As her funeral has passed, they will be happy to consider them again.’

Ben Moore, from Art Below, said was hopeful the decision would be overturned or ‘the guidelines will evolve to reflect a more democratic state’.

He added he wanted passengers at Westminster station to enjoy a ‘refreshing alternative of the Thatcher icon’.

source

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Thatcher wanted UK to withdraw from EU
« Reply #80 on: May 09, 2013, 06:07:47 PM »
Baroness Thatcher wanted UK to withdraw from EU, says biographer

Baroness Thatcher believed that Britain should withdraw from the European Union but was persuaded by her advisors to remain silent, it emerged.

Charles Moore, Lady Thatcher’s official biographer, who spent ten years working on the project with the co-operation of the former Prime Minister, revealed her hitherto unknown views during an interview organised by The Spectator Magazine.

Writing in this week’s edition he said he had been asked by the former Sunday Times editor Andrew Neil about her views on Europe after she left office.

“He asked me if, after leaving office, Lady Thatcher had come to the view that Britain should leave the European Union,” he wrote.

“I said yes (I think it happened after the Maastricht Treaty in 1992), although advisers had persuaded her that she should not say this in public since it would have allowed her opponents to drive her to the fringes of public life.”

But Mr Moore, a former editor of the Daily Telegraph, appeared unaware that what he had said was previously unknown.

“I had believed this was widely known, but according to Andrew, it is a story,” he added, before stating that he believed it showed that she was ahead of her time in seeing the current debate on Britain’s membership of the EU.

“My revelation, if such it was, came on the same day as Nigel Lawson’s piece in the Times saying that he would now vote for Britain to leave the EU.

“In this year, the 25th anniversary of (Thatcher’s) Bruges speech, people can see much more clearly that, far from living in ‘a ghetto of sentimentality about the past’ she was thinking harder than her contemporaries about the future of Europe.”

independent.co.uk
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #81 on: May 18, 2013, 10:18:28 PM »
I like this comment in "Der Spiegel" on an article about Angela Merkel, a protestant pastor's daughter,  having been granted a private audience with the Pope:


3. Schamlos
ruedigerguenter heute, 15:24 Uhr
Papst wird für Wahlkampf missbraucht. "The witch is alive !!!"

It translates:

shameles

The Pope is getting abused for the election campaign...


Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Doctor Who vs Mrs Thatcher
« Reply #82 on: November 17, 2013, 01:48:50 PM »
Doctor Who vs Mrs Thatcher – the showdown: The late leader appears as an evil tyrant in a 50th anniversary story

The year is 1984 and a genocidal Margaret Thatcher wants to replace the human race with time-travelling aliens from another dimension. There is only one person who can help: not Neil Kinnock, not Arthur Scargill, but Doctor Who.

Travelling in his infinitely accommodating Tardis, the Time Lord has vanquished the Daleks and dispatched the universe's most evil tyrants. But now, in a special story marking his 50th anniversary, Matt Smith's Doctor comes face to face with the Kin, an ancient foe of the Time Lords, which have adopted the persona of the late prime minister and now plan to rid the planet of humans.

In the story written by Neil Gaiman, the alien "Thatcher" has persuaded British homeowners to sell their properties at a vast profit under a plan to rid the planet of humans and replace them with the sinister Kin, an ancient time-travelling enemy of the Time Lords. The Doctor is tasked with rescuing humanity from her devilish plotting.

While left-wing scriptwriters are reported to have inserted anti-Thatcher storylines in the series during the 1980s, according to former Doctor Sylvester McCoy, the new tale is the first official meeting of the two cultural titans.

"Nothing O'Clock" has been written for a Penguin anthology of new short stories featuring all 11 Doctors. Gaiman, the best-selling author who has written two Matt Smith episodes for the BBC series, said he wanted to create "a creepy Doctor Who monster of the kind that we haven't quite seen before".

The creator of the Sandman graphic novel series added: "I wanted to see if I can scare people. I got to do lots of really interesting things including have the voice of the late Margaret Thatcher.

"She's there in 1984 and it was really a strange discovery that actually there's nothing quite as scary as a classic Doctor Who villain with Margaret Thatcher's speech patterns."

In the story, published this week, the fictional Thatcher – in reality the Kin wearing a mask – introduces herself to the Doctor in a familiar "breathy female voice". "You do know who we are, dear?' she asks with familiar menace. "It would be such a shame if you didn't."

Because the Kin has adopted the Thatcher guise, the Doctor says, people "are going to be much more willing to sell big important things, places that belong to the country, not to an individual, when they believe that the leader of their country is asking for them, personally". "Mrs Thatcher" explains that they will create "reservations" for the displaced humans but "they will die out. Well, dear … it won't be pretty". The Doctor rips off the Thatcher mask to reveal a face that "writhed and squirmed".

Readers can discover whether the Doctor foils the alien Thatcher master plan when Gaiman's story is released as an ebook download on Thursday. A physical anthology, including 10 other Doctor Who stories written by authors including Charlie Higson and Children's Laureate Malorie Blackman, will also be published.

Gaiman would like to see a television adaptation of the Thatcher/Doctor face-off. "There was definitely part of me who went, 'You know, wouldn't it be fun to put this on screen?'" he said. "Wouldn't this be fun to see if I can actually make people wee themselves with terror in real life?"

During the 1980s, a Doctor Who television story, The Happiness Patrol, featured a caricature of Thatcher, called Helen A, a big-haired despotic ruler of a human colony on the planet Terra Alpha, played by Sheila Hancock.

Andrew Cartmel, a former Doctor Who scriptwriter who once inserted a speech based on CND material in an episode, wrote a spin-off children's novel, which featured a villain called Rehctaht – Thatcher spelt backwards.

Sylvester McCoy said: "We were a group of politically motivated people and it seemed the right thing to do. Our feeling was that Margaret Thatcher was far more terrifying than any monster the Doctor had encountered."

The BBC marks the 50th anniversary next Saturday with a 75-minute special, The Day of the Doctor, starring Matt Smith, David Tennant, John Hurt and Billie Piper.

independent.co.uk
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Margaret Thatcher judged to be best post-war prime minister by politicians of all parties

Iron Lady valued for decisiveness, over traits such as honesty
Tony Blair came third in poll of 158 MPs by University of London
Of 13 post-war PMs, excluding David  Cameron, Gordon Brown came last

Politicians of all parties have voted Margaret Thatcher the most successful prime minister since the Second World War.

The Iron Lady was valued for her decisiveness, with most MPs citing this as a more important trait than principles, honesty or intelligence.

Mrs Thatcher, who spent 11 years at No10,  beat Labour’s Clement Attlee, who oversaw the creation of the NHS.

Dr Nicholas Allen, senior lecturer in politics at Royal Holloway, University of London, said: ‘The Iron Lady remain divisive, idolised by some, condemned by others.’

Tony Blair came third in the poll of 158 MPs by the university’s politics department.

Winston Churchill came fourth when judged on his second term from 1951 to 1955.

Of the MPs who took part, 69 were Tories, 67 Labour, 14 Lib Dem and eight from other parties.

Of the 13 post-war PMs, excluding David  Cameron, Gordon Brown came last.

Party affiliation was generally the strongest predictor of a leader’s success.

The exception to the rule was Edward Heath, the Conservative PM who took Britain into Europe.
Heath was unseated by Thatcher as party leader in 1975 and was rated more highly by Labour and Liberal Democrat MPs than by Conservatives.

Dr Allen added: 'It’s not surprising that MPs perceive Thatcher, Attlee and Blair to be the most successful prime ministers.

'Attlee and Thatcher both presided over fundamental shifts in British politics, while Blair, like Thatcher, was a proven election winner.

'When it comes to winning big majorities, David Cameron still has much to prove.'

dailymail.co.uk
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sicho

  • Guest
Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #84 on: January 04, 2014, 09:02:38 AM »
The Iron Lady was valued for her decisiveness, with most MPs citing this as a more important trait than principles, honesty or intelligence.

That just about sums up politics!
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #85 on: November 01, 2015, 04:28:05 PM »
Floating round the media today - What's the nickname of Margaret Thatcher

Ramkhamhaeng U's exam. "What's the nickname of Margaret Thatcher?" Stupid Bitch & Dumb Doll are in the answer choices. or can you think of a better one.


Pic@twitter.com/Ryn_writes
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: Margaret Thatcher
« Reply #86 on: November 01, 2015, 04:36:00 PM »
Her Royal Highness, Devoted Wife of Denis, Mother, Scourge of the Socialists, Greatest Prime Minister of All Time, the list is endless………

Wonder what names there would be for T. Blair or G. Brown?
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

 



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