Author Topic: I Vow To Thee My Country  (Read 2702 times)

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sicho

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I Vow To Thee My Country
« on: March 29, 2014, 03:19:39 PM »
Perhaps, after our Scottish friends have separated from the UK and, in anticipation of the Welsh reviving their similar aim, this should become England's national anthem.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bvouc8Qs_MI


I vow to thee, my country
All earthly things above
Entire and whole and perfect
The service of my love

The love that asks no questions
The love that stands the test
That lays upon the alter
The dearest and the best

The love that never falters
The love that pays the price
The love that makes undaunted
The final sacrifice

A love that asks no questions
A love that stands the test
That lays upon the alter
The dearest and the best

I vow to thee, my country
All earthly things above
Entire and whole and perfect
The service of my love

And there's another country
I've heard of long ago
Most dear to them that love her
Most great to them that know

We may not count her armies
We may not see her King
Her fortress is a faithful heart
Her pride is suffering

And soul by soul and silently
Her shining bounds increase
And her ways are ways of gentleness
And all her paths are peace

We may not count her armies
We may not see her King
Her fortress is a faithful heart
Her pride is suffering

And soul by soul and silently
Her shining bounds increase
And her ways are ways of gentleness
And all her paths are peace
 

Offline Roger

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Re: I Vow To Thee My Country
« Reply #1 on: April 06, 2014, 03:26:00 AM »
Aaawww Saf - you feeling homesick?
I'd certainly echo the last few verses though.
Some hope though !
ATB
 

Offline thaiga

Re: I Vow To Thee My Country
« Reply #2 on: April 06, 2014, 12:39:08 PM »
Yes homesick - sick of the uk - it ain't the same anymore - Arrrr this'll cheer you up.


                                                Dame Vera Lynn - Land of Hope and Glory

Dame Vera Lynn - Land of Hope and Glory
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: I Vow To Thee My Country
« Reply #3 on: April 06, 2014, 03:52:24 PM »
Cheers T. One great stirring song - almost nauseating in some ways.
Do I remember singing this at The Gaumont in Swindon at a young age before Saturday morning pictures - along with the 'Yellow Rose of Texas' ........... oh but we won't go there.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: I Vow To Thee My Country
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2014, 05:48:38 PM »

oh but we won't go there.
Whoopssssss to late - a trip down memory lane

First opened as The Regent in 1929 - then Renamed Gaumont in 1952 - then renamed again in 1963 as the Odeon Closed on 28/08/1974



The Regent Theatre was built by Gaumont British Theatres/Provincial Cinematograph Theatres and Albany Ward. It opened on 16th September 1929. Seating was on a stadium plan, with a raised section at the rear, rather than a conventional balcony. The Regent Theatre was equipped with a Compton 2Manual/6Rank organ which was opened by Compton’s own employees J.I. Taylor and W. Raymond. The cinema had a 42 feet wide proscenium.

Initially designed by architect W. Sydney Trent, in 1931 a new frontage was built which was designed by architects William Edward Trent and Ernest F. Tulley and this was completed in November 1931.

The Regent Theatre was re-named Gaumont Theatre from 1952 and it was re-named Odeon from 2nd June 1963. The Odeon was closed by the Rank Organisation on 24th August 1974 with Walt Disney’s "Robin Hood" and "Wild Geese Calling".

From November 1974 it was converted into a Top Rank Bingo Club, in later years becoming a Mecca Bingo Club. The Mecca Bingo Club closed suddenly on 10th April 2008, the building having been purchased by Swindon Borough Council for possible re-generation of the area. It was re-opened on 11th December 2010 as the M.E.C.A.(Music Entertainment Cultural Arena). Thanks to cinematreasures.org.

                                            A look at Swindon from today's perspective and yesteryear

SWINDON PAST & PRESENT
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Offline Roger

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Re: I Vow To Thee My Country
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2014, 09:50:50 PM »
Thanks Thaiga - Pics of the Gaumont great. Watched the Youtube too. I'll pass this on. ATB
 

Offline thaiga

Re: I Vow To Thee My Country
« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2014, 03:48:07 PM »
Why we're only 'somewhat proud' to be British

Forty-seven per cent of Britons are 'somewhat' proud of their country. The word is a splendid tool of British understatement – and perfectly in keeping with the national character


Yes, he's got the face paint, but he's not sure how he feels about it. Photograph: Julian Finney/Getty Images

Is Britain suffering a crisis of patriotic feeling? According to the latest British Social Attitudes survey, only 35% of Brits are now willing to say they are "very proud" to be British, down from 43% a decade ago. Another 47%, however, say they are "somewhat proud", which is an increase from last time.

What are we to make of this? Have we become slightly sheepish, as some have suggested, because of the Iraq war and the financial crisis? After the Olympics, and the national roar heard from space when Mo Farah won his second gold, that seems implausible. Could it be, rather, that claiming to be "very proud" of being British these days is too uncomfortably reminiscent of resurgent far-right parties and bonkers ale-quaffing anti-Europeanism?

For language-fanciers, the real news here is the continuing charm of that marvellously British word "somewhat", which has been used in English to mean "a little" or "to a certain extent" since the 14th century. In Chaucer's dream-vision poem "House of Fame" (c.1380), the poet hopes charmingly that the god Apollo will find his verse "sumwhat agreable", which critics have interpreted as a rejoinder to the more fame-hungry, laurel-chasing invocation of Apollo by Dante in his Paradiso. If so, then perhaps Chaucer invented the bardic humblebrag.

"Somewhat" has been a splendid tool of fine British understatement ever since. Helpfully, to say one is "somewhat proud" to be British is less ambiguous than saying one is "quite proud" to be British, since "quite" itself, in wonderfully British fashion, can mean either "a bit" or "very", depending on subtleties of tone and stress. (Compare "rather".)

It's therefore tempting to interpret the reduction in people saying they are "very proud" to be British as something to be, er, somewhat proud of. Being very proud to be British, after all, has never been very British. Much more in keeping with the national character is the polite, diffident murmur of "somewhat", with its ironic and modest deferral of judgment. This is the reasonable and hesitant land of "somewhat", and all the better for it. More or less.

theguardian
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