Author Topic: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage  (Read 8819 times)

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Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #30 on: August 19, 2012, 09:45:25 PM »
What now for Assange?


London (CNN) -- Julian Assange demanded that the United States drop its "witch hunt" against WikiLeaks on Sunday as he made his first public appearance after months effectively confined to the Embassy of Ecuador in London.

"As WikiLeaks stands under threat, so does the freedom of expression and the health of all our societies," the founder of website said to cheers from his supporters outside the embassy.

"The U.S. war on whistleblowers must end," Assange said, calling for the freedom of Bradley Manning, the U.S. soldier suspected of giving hundreds of thousands of pages of secret American government documents to Assange for publication on WikiLeaks.

Assange also referred to The New York Times, the Bahraini activist Nabeel Rajab and the Russian feminist punk band Pussy Riot in his 10-minute appearance.

The founder of WikiLeaks spoke from a balcony at the Embassy of Ecuador in London, where he has been holed up since June.

His lawyer Baltasar Garzon called earlier for him to be given safe passage to Ecuador from Britain.

"Mr. Assange is going to continue fighting for his rights," Garzon declared, saying that Assange had instructed his legal team to take action.

Garzon, an attorney from Spain who is best known from his years as a crusading judge, did not say what that legal action would be. Garzon was barred from the Spanish bench earlier this year for authorizing the wire-tapping of corruption suspects speaking to their lawyers.

Assange fled to the embassy avoid extradition to Sweden to face questioning about alleged sex crimes.

Sunday marks two months since Assange fled to the embassy. Monday marks two years since Swedish prosecutors first issued a warrant for his arrest, alleging that he raped one woman and sexually molested another.

Assange has been effectively confined for the past two months to the diplomatic mission -- a suite of rooms covering half of one floor of a townhouse in a posh London neighborhood south of Hyde Park.

Ecuador raised the stakes in its diplomatic row with the United Kingdom on Thursday, officially offering Assange asylum in the South American country -- but the British say they will not give him safe passage out of the embassy.

The Foreign Office says Britain has a legal obligation to hand him over to Sweden, after Assange's legal efforts to avoid extradition were rejected by British courts up to the Supreme Court.

Garzon said that Assange was willing to answer Swedish prosecutors' questions, but only if he is given certain guarantees.

Assange, an Australian, and his supporters claim a U.S. grand jury has been empaneled to consider charges against him.

Assange claims to fear Sweden will transfer him in turn to the United States, where he could face the death penalty for the work of WikiLeaks.

Sweden angrily rejected the allegation on Thursday.

"Sweden does not extradite individuals who risk facing the death penalty," the Foreign Ministry said after Ecuador granted Assange asylum.

Assange says the charges in Sweden are politically motivated and tied to the work of his website, which facilitates the publication of secret documents. He has published hundreds of thousands of pages of American government diplomatic cables and assessments of the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq.

His expected appearance comes as foreign ministers from various South American countries gather in Ecuador to discuss his fate.

The dispute between Britain and Ecuador exploded when the British Foreign Office, in a letter to Ecuadorian officials, cited a little known law that could temporarily suspend the embassy's diplomatic protection and allow authorities to enter and arrest Assange.

President Rafael Correa on Saturday slammed Britain's behavior toward Ecuador, describing it as "intolerable" and "unacceptable."

"Who do they think they're dealing with?" Correa asked rhetorically during his weekly address. "They don't realize Latin America is free and sovereign. We won't tolerate interference, colonialism of any kind."

The president said Ecuador had sought, but did not receive, guarantees that Assange would not be extradited to a third country.

Correa is seeking support on the issue from foreign ministers of the the Union of South American Nations and the leftist Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA), who are gathered in Guayaquil, Ecuador, this weekend.

ALBA, whose membership includes Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez, warned Britain on Saturday against raiding the embassy.

"We warn the government of the United Kingdom that it will face grave consequences around the world if it directly breaches the territorial integrity of the Embassy of the Republic of Ecuador in London," according to a statement read by Foreign Minister Nicolas Maduro on behalf of ALBA nations.

Assange was arrested in Britain in 2010 because Swedish authorities wanted to question him about the allegations. Two women accused him of sexually assaulting them during an August 2010 visit to Sweden in connection with a WikiLeaks release of internal U.S. military documents.

Assange denies the allegations and argues they are in retribution for his organization's disclosure of American secrets.

CNN
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Offline dodgeydave

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #31 on: August 20, 2012, 04:06:02 AM »
But you're still posting off-topic, BF! This thread is about the treatment of a guy by the British, a guy the Swedish want "for questioning about the accusation of having raped" only, a human rights issue, not the embarrassment he might have brought to Americans in general.

Johnnie F

Not sure of i agree with your comment above. as surely it is all related. As without Assange publishing the details on wikileaks. These trump up charges wouldn't see him wanted for anything. the swedes wouldn't want him extradited for the benefit of the yanks. and the brits wouldn't need to be lent on by the yanks to get him to sweden / america.
 

Offline Baby Farts

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #32 on: August 20, 2012, 05:08:38 AM »
BF, when the Pentagon Papers were revealed, Neil Sheehan, an American, the journalist of the New York Times, was praised by the international and the American public and other journalists for his detective work and revealing the lies and coverups of the time. The revelation of the Pentagon Pagers indirectly saved thousands or more like hundreds of thousands of American soldiers' lives and billions or even trillions of American tax-payers' dollars being wasted in Vietnam. What Wikileaks did with the United States embassy cables was just the same. The big difference though, is, that due to technological development Wikileaks did not only reach a far bigger and not only professionally-concerned and local or national audience, but almost everybody in the whole world, and especially relatively unfiltered by the press in between, it reached its audience directly via the internet; the embarrassment for the involved politicians was very much bigger due to that. But from the perspective of the people revealing these "secrets" it wasn't any different in the process of revealing secret government documents for the benefit of the people seeking true and complete information to base their own actions upon, i.e. who to vote for, who to demonstrate and agitate against etc., in short: to exercise democracy.

BTW the Nixon administration, especially Henry Kissinger, did also flips and twists to keep the New York Times from informing about the documents. But the Supreme Court decided in New York Times Co. v. United States (403 U.S. 713) for the right to publish that information. They based their decision on the First Amendment. The question before the court was whether the constitutional freedom of the press, guaranteed by the First Amendment, was subordinate to a claimed need of the executive branch of government to maintain the secrecy of information. The Supreme Court ruled that the First Amendment did protect the right of the New York Times to print the materials. If you agree now as a defender of the American Constitution, that the leaking of the Pentagon Papers by the New York Times, an American newspaper, was worth the embarrassment and spoiled political careers of some American politicians and administratives, you cannot deny that Wikileak's revelations have the same value! But that was long ago, got forgotten already... ;)

The internet gave us more democracy, and the internet gave people more direct access to information. Julian Anssanges and Wikileaks's "crime" might have been using the internet for this democratic purpose of informing their audience instead of newspapers nobody reads anymore. The times they have been changing. Politicians have to get used to the "downsides for their purposes" of the new media, too, instead of just using them for getting into power.

But you're still posting off-topic, BF! This thread is about the treatment of a guy by the British, a guy the Swedish want "for questioning about the accusation of having raped" only, a human rights issue, not the embarrassment he might have brought to Americans in general.


Stay on topic?  Look at what you just wrote.  With all due respect you have just swayed way off topic talking about Vietnam etc.  Have you ever served as a soldier in the US military?  I haven't, but my father was a fighter pilot in both the Korean war AND Vietnam who put his life on the line.  Don't even talk about Vietnam unless you were there.  Millions of lives saved?  What about the lives of our informants, their families, etc., who are now at risk due to Assange?  Doesn't that mean anything?  I guess not....trying to embarrass America is more important.   ::)  I don't know how many times I have to say it but I don't give a crap about the embarrassment to America or the careers of politicians being ruined.  You're eluding to the fact that he put peoples lives at risk, and now demanding the freedom of Bradley??????  The one who illegally gave top secret documents to Assange????   What do you have to say about that?  It's ok what he did?  Assange is basically saying free the man who betrayed his own country and gave away top secret documents illegally????  Who do you think pays for that soldier's salary.  OUR TAX dollars.  That soldier took an oath to protect our country and instead he sold his soul to the devil.  It's not the first time it has happened, but for him I can bet it's his last.  I hope the fame and glory was worth it.

The internet gave us more democracy?  C'mon JF that really is a poor excuse. I don't even want to go down that road.....but we can start a different topic about that if you want.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #33 on: August 20, 2012, 05:29:47 AM »
Sorry, BF, if I didn't make it simple enough for you! You had asked: Why don't you ask the American people how they feel about his "best intentions" for the planet and Americans." So I compared the Pentagon Papers affair and the impact of their revelation to the Embassy Cables affair to make you understand that the American public has already taken a stance on press freedom as it is guaranteed in the First Amendment. The American people not only wrote their own constitution they should keep respecting now, the judges of the Supreme Court were representing the American people when they decided that the publication of the Pentagon Papers was in accordance with the American Constitution, no matter how little politicians like Henry Kissinger et al appreciated that. The whole world was grateful.

Wikileaks did nothing else, and the publication of the Embassy Cables is as much in agreement with the Constitution of the US. If you don't like the constitution of your country, you can revoke your citizenship and give back your passport. But wait! Then you might not be able to show your passport, when a sniper from the CIA aims at you. ;D

The CIA should take his ass out.

2) Killing Julian Assange would send a message: Julian Assange is not an American citizen and he has no constitutional rights. So, there’s no reason that the CIA can’t kill him.

Ironic isn't it considering he's not an American citizen.

Ouch, is that what you mean to say, that an American citizen would have had the constitutional right guaranteed in the First Amendment of the Constitution of the United States to publish those Embassy Cables on the internet, but Julian Assange as a Swede does not have that right? :-[

Shouldn't they have written then: "We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men Americans(with the exception of the native Americans) are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People Americans (with the exception of the native Americans) only to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness."

And what to do with this: "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the American press publishing on the internet; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances."

Once more: What made Americans more unhappy about the publishing of the less harmful Embassy Cables than about the publishing of the Pentagon Papers in the (printed and sold) New York Times is the medium internet used. That came with technological development. If the internet had been there in its present availability already in 1971, and had been used for the publishing of the Pentagon Papers, Americans would have been far more angry about the revelation of the Pentagon Pagers than about the publishing of the Embassy Cables.
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Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #34 on: August 20, 2012, 05:53:46 AM »
But you're still posting off-topic, BF! This thread is about the treatment of a guy by the British, a guy the Swedish want "for questioning about the accusation of having raped" only, a human rights issue, not the embarrassment he might have brought to Americans in general.

Johnnie F

Not sure of i agree with your comment above. as surely it is all related. As without Assange publishing the details on wikileaks. These trump up charges wouldn't see him wanted for anything. the swedes wouldn't want him extradited for the benefit of the yanks. and the brits wouldn't need to be lent on by the yanks to get him to sweden / america.


As we did already discuss the Wikileaks Affair over and over on threads dedicated to that topic only, I don't see any reason to repeat the whole discussion at every related occurrence. A reference to the stance you expressed in another thread can be posted with just a link there. No need for repeating yourself over and over again. Just imagine how confused and bored our readers must get to read the same over and over again, just on another thread. If you have something significant to add, posting it on the original thread would keep this board a lot clearer. If you have nothing new to say anyway, a link to where you posted your opinion before is sufficient.

Julian Assange & Wikileaks (76 posts)

Julian Assange Loses Extradition Appeal (20 posts)

WikiLeaks cable reveals US role in 2006 Thai coup (5 posts)

WikiLeaks publishes 'millions' of Stratfor emails (1 post)

There is definitely no reason to go into the same discussion on each of those topics. It would help people interested in reading our contributions a lot more, if we would confine the discussion to the topic named in the title of the thread, instead of inserting repetitions of discussions we had on other threads before,  under another title now, but  with no different content or outcome. Aren't you worried about what impression you give by doing that? I usually smile about others' discussions going around in circles just repeating hard-headed assertions.

BF should especially be worried by his use of words that need to be blocked by the swear word filter. He should preview each post carefully instead of posting "hot-blooded", especially watch out to not keep repeating assertions that have already been refuted as not proven, do keep up the presumption of innocence!

I read in a post by Alfie on his forum yesterday: "Perhaps that should be a topic - how to debate." I must say, that is a great idea, learning to debate first instead of constantly making a fool of yourself. It certainly does apply to more people than his posters.
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Offline Baby Farts

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #35 on: August 20, 2012, 01:12:57 PM »
Jf, you have gone completely off topic and have continued ( in your own words) to rant about a subject that is going no where.  I'm not interested in this discussion anymore.  You continue to elude to the fact that Assange has caused collateral damage in his quest to expose America.  You were the one one who brought up Nixon, Vietnam, Pentagon papers etc, and yet you are asking me to stay on topic? 

You make reference to my comments about the CIA, but let me ask you this. If you had the chance to take out hitler before he slaughtered millions of Jews, would you seize the opportunity to lay him to rest?
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #36 on: August 20, 2012, 02:03:37 PM »
If you had the chance to take out hitler before he slaughtered millions of Jews, would you seize the opportunity to lay him to rest?

Definitely yes, and that's why I am convinced that Julian Assange did the world a great service by exposing those ambassadors' chat etc. Let's hope they've learned now to be more careful about their way of representing people.

If Hitler could have been exposed that way, on the internet with direct access by about everybody, he could never have gotten into power and done those horrible things. The internet gives us the power to keep "other Hitlers" from rising, in whichever country that might be.

Now that you proceeded "according to protocol", let's ask the question why I as a German can so easily condemn what Hitler and my countrymen have done, while you for example go nuts and deny, when you're confronted with "the engagement" of your countrymen in Southeast Asia 40 years and longer ago.
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Offline dodgeydave

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #37 on: August 20, 2012, 02:11:06 PM »
Trying to get this back on track

The Union of South American Nations has said it backs Ecuador
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #38 on: August 20, 2012, 02:17:03 PM »
For them of course it's a welcome occasion for PR, though hardly any of their politicians is any better than the ones involved on the other side. It's hard to make any predictions, but it appears that the British, Swedish and American governments didn't understand what they're up against. It's just a little game, but they've already made themselves the losers. No doubt Julian Assange knows what he's doing, how he's pulling strings. Who would have had the idea to run into the Embassy of Ecuador?
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Offline dodgeydave

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #39 on: August 20, 2012, 02:51:32 PM »
You would not run to the Ecuador embassy by chance. So there has to be a bit of money changing hands.

http://www.therichest.org/celebnetworth/celeb/internet/julian-assange-net-worth/

according to the above website he is worth $1.3 million. But i wouldn't think that would last very long even in Ecuador.so he must have money stashed away. i dont think anyone declares to the authority's there full net worth.

the longer this goes on the worse it is looking for the  British , American & Swedish governments.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #40 on: August 20, 2012, 03:02:11 PM »
You would not run to the Ecuador embassy by chance. So there has to be a bit of money changing hands.

While awaiting the court decision about his extradition Julian Assange was hosting a talkshow for cable TV. The Ecuadorian ambassador had recently been a guest to his talkshow. That's where they met, and where maybe the foundation to this friendship was laid. I think the PR from having somebody like Assange as a friend is worth a lot more than just a few million dollars. He is a clever media man. Most politicians struggle to have such popular media people as friends.
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Offline dodgeydave

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #41 on: August 20, 2012, 11:39:14 PM »
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-19323783

George Galloway has been criticised by anti-rape campaigners after suggesting Julian Assange was accused of nothing more than "bad sexual etiquette".

Mr Assange is wanted in Sweden to face allegations - which he denies - of sexual assault made by two women.

The Respect MP said the women's claims were "totally unproven" and the Wikileaks founder had been "set up".

Rape charity Crisis said Mr Galloway's comments were "offensive" and "deeply concerning".

The UK has said Mr Assange must be extradited to Sweden despite being given political asylum by Ecuador.

Mr Assange remains holed up in the Ecuadorean embassy in London but the UK has said he will not given safe passage to the Latin American country.

'Bad manners'

Mr Assange insists that he had consensual sex with each of the women who have made allegations against him.

Start Quote

If the allegations made by these two women were true, 100 per cent true, and even if a camera in the room captured them, they don't constitute rape”

George Galloway
His legal team has said he wants assurances from the Swedish government that he will not be extradited to the US - where Wikileaks caused a storm last year by publishing thousands of leaked diplomatic cables and correspondence.

Mr Galloway, a frequent critic of the US and UK governments, said Mr Assange's "only crime was to expose, through Wikileaks, malfeasance by states including our own and the US on a truly gargantuan scale".

In a thirty minute podcast, the controversial anti-war MP said it was "an extraordinary coincidence that public enemy number one, Julian Assange, somehow gets inveigled with two women with incredibly complex political backgrounds who just, at the right time, come forward with allegations of sexual misconduct against him".

"Let me tell you, I think that Julian Assange's personal sexual behaviour is sordid, disgusting, and I condemn it," he said.

"But even taken at its worst, if the allegations made by these two women were true, 100 per cent true, and even if a camera in the room captured them, they don't constitute rape.

"At least not rape as anyone with any sense can possibly recognise it. And somebody has to say this."

'Factually incorrect'

The Bradford West MP suggested one of the women had claimed she invited Mr Assange back to her flat, had consensual sex with him and then "woke up to him having sex with her again - something which can happen, you know".

On the issue of whether this would constitute rape or not, Mr Galloway suggested that "not everybody needs to be asked prior to each insertion".

"Some people believe that when you go to bed with somebody, take off your clothes, and have sex with them and then fall asleep, you're already in the sex game with them.

"It might be really bad manners not to have tapped her on the shoulder and said, 'do you mind if I do it again?'

"It might be really sordid and bad sexual etiquette, but whatever else it is, it is not rape or you bankrupt the term rape of all meaning."

Rape Crisis said the MP's understanding of what constituted rape was "factually incorrect" and that if the woman concerned was asleep when the sexual encounter began, consent could not "reasonably" have been given.

"Having had consensual sex with a woman once does not give a man licence to then have sex with her again at any time and in any way he pleases and assume consent is given," a spokeswoman said.

"By the same token, having had consensual sex with someone once does not mean a woman has forever forfeited her right to withdraw or refuse her consent to further sex with that person.

"Sex without consent is rape. Mr Galloway's description of such sexual violence as 'really bad manners' is offensive and deeply concerning."

Mr Galloway was not available for comment.
 

Offline dodgeydave

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #42 on: August 20, 2012, 11:42:21 PM »
and some interesting comments from the uk and world press

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-19316973

Julian Assange urged the US to end its "witch-hunt" against Wikileaks in his first public statement since entering Ecuador's London embassy. Speaking from a balcony on Sunday he thanked Ecuador's president for granting him asylum.

But what did commentators and pundits from across the UK and the world think of his performance?

UK reaction

Luke Harding, the Guardian: "At around 2.30pm Assange emerged on to the balcony, a pallid figure dressed in a business-blue shirt and maroon tie. There was an enormous roar. Assange managed a thumbs-up, then tapped the microphone and inquired: "Can you hear me?" This, perhaps, was the moment for someone to shout: "'E's not the Messiah! 'E's a very naughty boy!"

"Still, one senses Scotland Yard may get the last laugh. Ecuador is a long way away. 'He's not going anywhere,' one police officer said of Assange, as the crowds melted away in the rain."

Andy McSmith, the Independent: "A competent image consultant could have warned him not to emerge into the public eye looking as he did. Far from giving him a Churchillian look, his blue shirt, crimson tie and cropped hair created - as one wag pointed out on Twitter - a curious resemblance to John Inman, from the 1970s' sitcom Are you Being Served?

"But what was much more serious - the elephant in the room, so to speak - was Assange's wilful failure to say anything about the actual reason that the Swedish police want to question him."

The Sun's editorial: "Odious Julian Assange loved every second of his pompous balcony rant. His speech was long on egotistical claptrap, but oddly failed to mention what this extradition case is actually about — the rape of one woman and sexual molestation of another.

"If Mr Assange really does believe in the importance of transparent justice in a democratic state, he should subject HIMSELF to it now and get on the first plane to Sweden."

Melanie Phillips, the Daily Mail: "Posing as a champion of justice and human rights, Assange made a theatrical statement from the balcony of the Ecuador embassy in London's exclusive Knightsbridge, for all the world like an Eva Peron of the ether. Instead of the adoring multitude, however, all he addressed was a few bedraggled if noisy supporters, scores of police officers trying both to stop a riot and protect him from being shot, and phalanxes of the world's media delighted by a dramatic story in the August silly-season.

"Not since the Argentines invaded the Falklands has Britain had its tail so humiliatingly tweaked by a Latin American dictatorship. Suddenly, Ecuador is on the lips of people who previously would have struggled to find it on a map. All this merry mayhem is, of course, being orchestrated by Assange, who continues to play the British governing class for suckers."

Gary Slapper, the Times: "He got off to a bad start. It was an explicit precondition of his being granted asylum by Ecuador that he did not use his status within the embassy to make political speeches. So technically his outrageous address denied him the right to be on the balcony from which he spoke.

"The appropriate palladium of justice is a law court. The case of Mr Assange cannot be adequately judged on the pages of Facebook, by a million tweets and counter-tweets or by political balcony declarations and governmental counter-declarations."

World press reaction

Sydney Morning Herald, editorial: "The case of Julian Assange gets ever more curious - with the Andean nation of Ecuador now thoroughly drawn into the web of conspiracy fears and paranoia surrounding the WikiLeaks founder.

"We now have a democratic government in the American hemisphere granting asylum to someone on the basis of well-grounded fear of political persecution in the United States. The case is a dark hole of legal and human rights suspicions that needs the light of transparent judicial process."

The Australian editorial: "Should you try to peer through the suspended animation currently encircling Julian Assange's medium-term future you might be tempted to punt that he won't be extradited to the US to face espionage charges.

"Assange is an Australian and Australia is a staunch US ally. If Assange's legal future became a major talking point in this country, you could probably expect a bit of nationalism to intrude. It's likely, though not certain, that Assange would be seen as wearing the white jersey and the US perceived as wearing a black one. In other words, it probably wouldn't transpire as a US public relations triumph."

Anita Isaacs, New York Times: Ecuador's decision to grant asylum to Julian Assange, the founder of WikiLeaks wanted in Sweden for questioning over claims of rape and sexual molestation, has put the country in a political standoff with Britain, where he is holed up in the Ecuadorean Embassy.

"But the confusion in London has, in fact, little if anything to do with Ecuadorean-British relations and everything to do with regional and local politics in the Western Hemisphere."

Martin Jonsson, Svenska Dagbladet, Sweden: "Julian Assange's speech on the balcony to the Ecuadorean Embassy in London was the culmination of a week of diplomatic chaos. But also: further evidence of how totally Assange seems to have lost its grip on reality."

Anshel Pfeffer, Israel's Haaretz: "Many were reminded of the famous scene in Monty Python's Life of Brian, and began shouting 'Release Julian, release Julian'. That was followed by cries of 'I am Julian, I am Julian'. Thus the fugitive's emergence took a farcical atmosphere."
 

sicho

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #43 on: August 21, 2012, 08:29:00 AM »
The establishment press has been briefed on what to say, it seems.

If what George said about one of the alleged incidents is correct, then the charge is frivolous and I don't understand why the Court decided in favour of extradition - other than the obvious one.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #44 on: August 22, 2012, 03:29:53 PM »
Speaking to reporters, President Rafael Correa said Britain must "withdraw the grave error it committed by threatening Ecuador to possibly raid its diplomatic mission to arrest Mr Julian Assange."

Wonder why they never done that for WPC Yvonne Fletcher at the Libyan embassy


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #45 on: August 22, 2012, 07:26:47 PM »
Speaking to reporters, President Rafael Correa said Britain must "withdraw the grave error it committed by threatening Ecuador to possibly raid its diplomatic mission to arrest Mr Julian Assange."

Wonder why they never done that for WPC Yvonne Fletcher at the Libyan embassy

Read the research information about that I posted above.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #46 on: August 22, 2012, 07:35:14 PM »
DUH page 1    :cheers GOT IT
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #47 on: August 25, 2012, 09:13:32 PM »
Police note lets slip Julian Assange arrest plan


A document is held by an unidentified British police officer, which outlines that Assange to be arrested under all circumstances, if he comes out of the Embassy of Ecuador, in central London, Friday Aug. 24, 2012. The briefing paper photographed as an official carried it outside the Ecudorian embassy, lays out the major difficulty the WikiLeaks founder Assange faces even though hes received diplomatic asylum, he is safe from arrest as long as he stays inside the embassy.

THE order is simple and the note brief but it points to a likelihood of a complex and lengthy impasse between Ecuador and Britain over the future of Wikileaks founder Julian Assange.

"Assange to be arrested under all circumstances," the confidential Scotland Yard note seen yesterday being carried by an officer outside the Ecuador embassy reads.

And therein lies the problem. He has political asylum in Ecuador but cannot get there with Britain refusing to let him step onto public soil without immediate arrest, detention and extradition to Sweden to face sexual assault allegations.

Scotland Yard acknowledged the handwritten note was from a briefing and stressed that the force's objective is to arrest Assange for breach of bail.

"Under no circumstances would any arrest be made which was in breach of diplomatic immunity," Scotland Yard said.

Mr Assange has been living in the backroom of the Ecuador embassy in upmarket Knightsbridge now since June 19 when he claimed asylum on the grounds if he was sent to Sweden he would likely be extradited to the US to face life in jail for the leaking of 250,000 secret US diplomatic and military cables. The stand off could last for months.

About a dozen British police guard the front and back entrances to the building housing the embassy and routinely patrol about fire escapes and an adjoining loading dock, used by the embassy’s neighbor the luxury department store Harrods.

Yesterday, South American countries backed their small fellow Andean nation in its decision to grant asylum to Mr Assange. Ambassadors from several South American countries went to the Ecuadorian embassy in London this morning (AEST) to show their support.

"This display of support for the Ecuadorian Government by South American ambassadors is a clear indication of the level of support Ecuador has amongst countries in America and a clear statement opposing the UK Government's threats against the integrity and sovereignty of its embassy in London," an embassy spokesman said.

Argentina, no friend of Britain since the 1982 Falklands War, accused the British Government’s public threat made two weeks to waive immunity and go into the embassy to get 41-year-old Mr Assange out as a violation of international law.

"This action shows the arrogance of British diplomacy," the Argentinian Embassy said in a statement.

"It doesn’t come as a surprise for Argentinians, as it is similar to the British statements on the Malvinas (Falklands) Question, in which the U.K. has also disregarded international law."

Britain's Foreign Office today had sought to defuse the situation, offering to hold formal discussions about Mr Assange and denying it had made any threat to storm the embassy.

"Ecuador celebrates the change of attitude of the United Kingdom," Ecuador’s Foreign Minister Ricardo Patino said.

"But the threat has already been made and continues in effect because it has not been withdrawn."

Herald Sun
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #48 on: August 26, 2012, 11:07:57 PM »


Julian Assange case: President of Ecuador says sexual allegations would not be a crime in other countries
Rafael Correa, the President of Ecuador, has suggested the allegations in Sweden against Julian Assange would not be crimes in nearly every other country.

The left-wing South American premier told a Sunday newspaper the accusations against the WikiLeaks founder were "not a crime in Latin America" and had played no part in Quito's decision to grant Assange asylum.

In Sweden Assange is alleged to have had sex without a condom with one woman while she slept, after consensual sex earlier. His lawyers say that on waking she consented.

A lawyer for Assange told a court that a second woman claims to have tried "several times to reach for a condom" but Assange stopped her by holding her arms.

"The crimes that Assange is accused of, they would not be crimes in 90 to 95 percent of the planet," Mr Correa told the Sunday Times.

Asked how allegedly using force to begin intercourse could not be a crime, he reportedly answered:

"A woman he was staying with? Sleeping together in the same bed? Let's pass this on to the Swedish justice system. But, for example, not to use a condom in an act between a couple, this is not a crime in Latin America."

Mr Correa also blasted the British government for its "contradictions" in wanting to extradite Assange to Sweden, when it did not extradite former Chilean dictator Augusto Pinochet after his 1998 arrest in London on an international arrest warrant issued by Spanish judge Baltasar Garzon, who is now heading Assange's legal team

Assange, having exhausted all his legal options in Britain to avoid extradition to Sweden, walked into the Ecuadorian embassy on June 19 and claimed asylum.

Assange claims that if he is extradited to Sweden he risks being sent to the US to be tried over 'Wikleaks'.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/wikileaks/9500226/Julian-Assange-case-President-of-Ecuador-says-sexual-allegations-would-not-be-a-crime-in-other-countries.html
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Baby Farts

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #49 on: August 27, 2012, 06:39:42 AM »
So now he's being charged for going bare-back.    :drink
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #50 on: August 27, 2012, 12:13:59 PM »
Bear back
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Offline Baby Farts

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Re: Britain refuses to give Assange safe passage
« Reply #51 on: September 01, 2012, 07:18:43 PM »
More collateral damage as a result of the wave effect on other Assange hackers.  I guess this sort of thing is fair for these police officers in order to "prove how insecure the web is."   ::) ::)


Looks too like he is predicting a year stay in the Ecuador embassy for "FEAR" of being extradited to the US.  If what he did was in the best interest of the world and especially the American people as he claims, he has nothing to be afraid of.  Besides, the US hasn't requested an extradition for him and Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt said that his country would not extradite a suspect to a country where they would face the death penalty.

"British police logins grabbed by 'Free Assange' hacker"

A hacker has posted online what appears to be login information for police officers in the Hertfordshire and Nottinghamshire constabularies.

The usernames, passwords and PINs were posted to Pastebin on Thursday, along with the banner 'OpFreeAssange' and a quote from Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. The hacker, '0x00x00', stressed that he or she was not a member of Anonymous.
PoliceA hacker claims to have published login details for two UK police forces.

In a statement, Hertfordshire Constabulary said it was investigating the breach, and confirmed that the information had been "stored on a database linked to the public Safer Neighbourhoods pages of the external Constabulary website".

The force said the database was externally hosted. The Pastebin document refers to Amazon Web Services, but a Hertfordshire Constabulary spokesperson was not able to confirm AWS was the hosting provider.

Hertfordshire Constabulary said it had disabled part of its website as a precaution, but there was "absolutely no suggestion that any personal data relating to officers or members of the public has been, or could have been compromised".

A spokesperson for Nottinghamshire Constabulary said in a statement that, following initial inquiries, the force was "confident at this stage that no restricted or confidential information was accessed or databases compromised".

"We continue to investigate and have taken steps to further strengthen security around our website as a precaution," the statement continued.

The hacker said in the Pastebin document: "This is nothing big not some l33t h4x shit ... but this tells how insecure the Web is."

Julian Assange is currently holed up in the Ecuadorian embassy in London, having claimed asylum there after losing his fight against extradition to Sweden, to face questioning over sex crime allegations.

Assange maintains that, if sent to Sweden, he will then be deported again to the US to face charges over US military and diplomatic secrets that were published through Wikileaks.

His situation has sparked several online attacks, against targets such as the Ministry of Justice, that have apparently been perpetrated by members of the hacking collective Anonymous.


http://www.zdnet.com/british-police-logins-grabbed-by-free-assange-hacker-7000003553/
 

Offline thaiga

Re: WikiLeaks' Assange has lung trouble: Ecuador envoy
« Reply #52 on: November 29, 2012, 03:20:24 PM »
WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been holed up at Ecuador's London embassy for five months, has a lung condition that could get worse, the South American country's envoy to Britain said Wednesday.

"He has a chronic lung condition that could worsen at any time," Ambassador Ana Alban told reporters ahead of an annual gathering of Ecuador's diplomatic corps with President Rafael Correa in Quito.

Ecuador "is covering his medical expenses" and arranging "regular medical checkups," Alban said, noting that Assange, 41, has been living "in a confined space" since seeking asylum 162 days ago to avoid extradition to Sweden.

She did not give further details on his health.

A spokesman for WikiLeaks in London, Kristinn Hrafnsson, declined comment on Assange's health when contacted by AFP.

WikiLeaks enraged Washington in 2010 by leaking hundreds of thousands of classified US documents on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan and embarrassing diplomatic cables from US embassies around the world.

Assange was arrested that same year

Assange was arrested that same year.

He denies the allegations of rape and sexual assault and claims that if he is extradited to Sweden, he could be passed on to the United States and prosecuted, facing a long prison term or even the death sentence.

Ecuador granted Assange asylum on August 16, but Britain has refused to grant him safe passage out of the country -- leaving the two governments in diplomatic deadlock and Assange stuck inside the embassy.

bangkokpost
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: O come, let us adore him! Faithful break into song for Julian Assange
« Reply #53 on: December 21, 2012, 02:32:10 PM »
Spare a thought for Julian Assange.



For the founder of WikiLeaks, living in forced asylum in the Ecuadorian Embassy, and threatened with instant arrest the minute he walks out the door, one thing is certain: he won’t be going home for Christmas.

Mr Assange, who has not stepped outside the small building in central London since seeking asylum there in June, made only his second public appearance in six months last night.

Appearing at a first-floor balcony in front of 200 adoring fans and the cameras of the world’s media organisations, he gave a short address in which he entreated his supporters not to give up on Wikileaks – or on him.

The crowds that stood in constant vigil outside the Embassy in the early days of Mr Assange’s asylum have dissipated somewhat of late. Wikileaks has been subject, according to its founder, to a campaign of censorship. Credit card companies have blocked donations to the website – a move that Mr Assange said cost the organisation £30m and resulted in a 40 per cent pay cut for its small staff.

Meanwhile, he has not been seen in public since August. His appearance last night was viewed by many as a bid to reclaim the limelight after several months in which the world has largely forgotten about him. Supporters, many of whom came with candles and musical instruments, serenaded their hero with Christmas carols before his balcony appearance. A rousing chorus of “O come, let us adore him” raised a wry smile from one of the police officers stationed outside the embassy.

The building has been under constant surveillance since Assange’s asylum bid caused a major diplomatic incident between the UK and Ecuador. The UK’s Supreme Court has authorised extradition proceedings against Assange who is wanted in Sweden where he faces sexual assault charges dating back to 2010, which he denies. Ecuador’s government says Assange would face “persecution” if arrested, or be sent to the United States to be charged with espionage in light of Wikileaks’ publication of thousands of classified documents.

For a man who has not seen daylight in six months, Assange appeared to be in good spirits. Raising his fist in the air like a rock star he opened with: “Good evening London! What a sight for sore eyes.”

His speech, which lasted just 10 minutes, was not a traditional Christmas message. To shouts of “We love you Julian!” he railed against the world’s governments and media, and hailed the continuing work of Wikileaks in uncovering corruption and wrongdoing.

“True democracy is not at the White House, it’s not in Canberra,” said the 41-year-old Australian. “It is people armed with truth against lies, from Tahrir Square to London.”

As huge Bentleys and Rolls Royces rolled past – the embassy is in one of London’s wealthiest neighbourhoods, a stones throw from Harrods – he called on the enthralled crowd to “challenge the statements of those who seek to control us” and to “unite in common purpose and common principle”.

He made a brief reference to allegations that he sexually assaulted two female former Wikileaks employees in 2010, pointing out that he had never been charged with a crime and insisting that “his door was open” to anyone who wanted to talk to him.

But not, of course, to anyone who wants to arrest him.

The crowd seemed pleased to see their hero still playing the revolutionary. He promised that Wikileaks would release one million new cables in 2013, and said the organisation could damage “any country in the world”. Then with a final invocation to the crowd to “learn, challenge and act – now!” he raised his fist like a rock star again and vanished behind like a conjuror.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Assange said to be weighing U.S. Senate request to talk 2016 election
« Reply #54 on: August 10, 2018, 12:21:57 AM »
Assange said to be weighing U.S. Senate request to talk 2016 election, WikiLeaks

Assange fears extradition to U.S. and is separately under British arrest warrant

WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, who has been holed up in Ecuador's London Embassy for six years, is considering an offer to appear before a U.S. Senate committee to discuss alleged Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. election, his lawyer said on Thursday.

WikiLeaks published a letter from the U.S. intelligence committee on Wednesday that asked Assange to make himself available to testify in person at a closed hearing as part of its investigation into whether Moscow meddled to help Donald Trump win the 2016 presidential election.

Russia rejects the claims and Trump has denied any collusion.

"The U.S. Senate select committee request confirms their interest in hearing from Mr Assange," lawyer Jennifer Robinson said in a statement. "The inquiry has asked for him to appear in person at a mutually agreeable time and place. We are seriously considering the offer but must ensure Mr. Assange's protection is guaranteed."

Assange has been living in the Ecuadorean Embassy since he was granted asylum in 2012 to avoid extradition to Sweden to face questions about allegations of sex crimes, accusations that were later dropped.

However, he would be arrested by British police for breaching bail conditions should he leave the building, and has always said he fears being extradited to the United States for having published a huge cache of U.S. diplomatic and military secrets on the WikiLeaks website.

full article cbc.ca
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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