Author Topic: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse  (Read 9230 times)

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sicho

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A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« on: January 16, 2013, 10:38:43 AM »
Tesco have been caught flogging dead horses.

This from the BBC:

15 January 2013 Last updated at 22:24 GMT

Horsemeat found in beef burgers on sale in UK and Ireland


Horse DNA has been found in some beef burgers being sold in UK and Irish supermarkets, the Republic of Ireland's food safety authority (FSAI) has said. The FSAI said the meat came from two processing plants in Ireland, Liffey Meats and Silvercrest Foods, and the Dalepak Hambleton plant in Yorkshire. It said there was no risk to health.

The burgers were on sale in Tesco and Iceland in the UK and Ireland. In the Republic of Ireland they were on sale in Dunnes Stores, Lidl and Aldi.

The FSAI said the retailers stated that they were removing all implicated batches of the burgers. A total of 27 products were analysed, with 10 of them containing horse DNA and 23 containing pig DNA.

'Unacceptable'

Horsemeat accounted for approximately 29% of the meat content in one sample from Tesco.In addition, 31 beef meal products, including cottage pie, beef curry pie and lasagne, were analysed, of which 21 tested positive for pig DNA. The chief executive of the FSAI, Professor Alan Reilly, said that while the findings posed no risk to public health, they did raise some concerns.

Irish Minister for Agriculture, Simon Coveney: ''There is no food safety risk. Whilst, there is a plausible explanation for the presence of pig DNA in these products due to the fact that meat from different animals is processed in the same meat plants, there is no clear explanation at this time for the presence of horse DNA in products emanating from meat plants that do not use horsemeat in their production process," he said.

"In Ireland, it is not in our culture to eat horsemeat and therefore, we do not expect to find it in a burger," Professor Reilly added. "Likewise, for some religious groups or people who abstain from eating pig meat, the presence of traces of pig DNA is unacceptable."

The Irish Minister for Agriculture, Simon Coveney, said he was concerned by the FSAI's findings, and had sent government vets into the factory that produced the 29% horsemeat burger to interview management. He reassured the public that the burgers posed no health risk and added that the Republic of Ireland "probably has the best traceability and food safety in the world".

'Extremely serious'

Tesco's group technical director, Tim Smith, said his company was informed of the test results by the FSAI on Tuesday and they "immediately withdrew from sale all products from the supplier in question". In Tesco's case, two frozen beef burger products that are sold in both the UK and Ireland were found to contain horse DNA. In a statement, Mr Smith said: "The safety and quality of our food is of the highest importance to Tesco. We will not tolerate any compromise in the quality of the food we sell. The presence of illegal meat in our products is extremely serious." He added that Tesco was "working with the authorities in Ireland and the UK, and with the supplier concerned, to urgently understand how this has happened and how to ensure it does not happen again".

'Quality'

Iceland said it has "withdrawn from sale the two Iceland brand quarter pounder burger lines implicated in the study". In a statement, the company said it noted the FSAI's findings "with concern" and "would be working closely with its suppliers to investigate this issue and to ensure that all Iceland brand products meet the high standards of quality and integrity that we specify and which our customers are entitled to expect".

Aldi said only one of its products - which is only on sale in the Republic of Ireland - was affected. In a statement, Aldi Stores (Ireland) said: "Following notification this afternoon from the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) of an issue in relation to our Oakhurst Beef Burgers (8 pack) we have immediately removed the product from sale and have launched an investigation into the matter." The company said it "takes the quality of all its products extremely seriously and demands the highest standards from its suppliers".

Lidl was not immediately available for comment when contacted by the BBC.

Meanwhile, Silvercrest Foods and Dalepak both said they had never bought or traded in horse product and have launched an investigation into two continental European third party suppliers.
 

Offline coolkorat

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2013, 12:00:59 PM »
I had a burger from Tesco last week. Tasted OK, but it didn't half give me the trots.
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #2 on: January 16, 2013, 12:24:12 PM »
 :lol :lol :lol

That's why the flat is better than hurdles.

Who was six foot six inches tall, weighed 25 stone and rode a Derby winner?

One of Roger's free beers for the first to get the right answer.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2013, 04:56:04 PM »

Who was six foot six inches tall, weighed 25 stone and rode a Derby winner?

One of Roger's free beers for the first to get the right answer.
lester piggots boyfriend
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #4 on: January 16, 2013, 05:00:13 PM »
I had a burger from Tesco last week. Tasted OK, but it didn't half give me the trots.
Very good that surely deserves one of rogers beers. :cheers
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #5 on: January 16, 2013, 05:25:44 PM »
lester piggots boyfriend

Well done! Contact Roger for your free Leo.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #6 on: January 16, 2013, 06:18:16 PM »
I once tried horse meat in a restaurant in Milan and very good it was too.  The horsey beefburgers probably taste better than the real thing.  Here is a very good opportunity for Nookie to buy up Tesco's redundant stock.  I cannot understand the Anglo Saxon hangup about eating horses.  After all we eat cuddly sheep and pigs who are supposed to be as intelligent as humans.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #7 on: January 16, 2013, 08:00:56 PM »
Was it the mane course?
 

Offline thaiga

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #8 on: January 16, 2013, 09:01:23 PM »
Well done! Contact Roger for your free Leo.
On thinking back didn't lester piggot get banged up for a short time (no pun intended) for tax evasion
and at that time the answer to the joke was  LESTER PIGGOTS CELL MATE.  :cheers HA! HA!
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #9 on: January 16, 2013, 09:38:03 PM »
Was it the mane course?

Saf, this is almost a smiteable offence!  Didn't know about Lester Piggott.  That one passed me by.  Then again I am  not really into grubbing about in stables or prison cells.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #10 on: January 16, 2013, 10:03:32 PM »
On thinking back didn't lester piggot get banged up for a short time (no pun intended) for tax evasion
and at that time the answer to the joke was  LESTER PIGGOTS CELL MATE.  :cheers HA! HA!

You're quite right. However, the original joke contained a term now regarded as racist and 'boyfriend' is socially acceptable these days so your p.c. version of the answer is acceptable.  8)

Roger, where's the free beer?
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #11 on: January 16, 2013, 10:04:28 PM »
Was it the mane course?

Saf, this is almost a smiteable offence!  Didn't know about Lester Piggott.  That one passed me by.  Then again I am  not really into grubbing about in stables or prison cells.

Where do you get your horse meat then? Rump is available both behind stables and in prison, so I heard.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #12 on: January 17, 2013, 03:10:47 AM »
Taman Tun - I agree with you - why the hang up about horse meat ? I first tried it (unknowingly) over 50 years ago in Gay Paris on a school holiday on the way to Italy. Since then tried it again in France. Of course, horse meat should not be included in an implied 'beef burger' !
But otherwise, quite tasty if I remember !
Sorry Saf, you missed your chance with the LeO - 'Archers' addicts only !
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #13 on: January 17, 2013, 05:41:23 AM »
Hi Roger, I am very pleased to see you using the "g" word in its intended manner.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #14 on: January 17, 2013, 07:20:19 AM »
Taman Tun - I agree with you - why the hang up about horse meat ? I first tried it (unknowingly) over 50 years ago in Gay Paris on a school holiday on the way to Italy. Since then tried it again in France. Of course, horse meat should not be included in an implied 'beef burger' !
But otherwise, quite tasty if I remember !
Sorry Saf, you missed your chance with the LeO - 'Archers' addicts only !

Shame about the Leo but thanks for the offer of some Archa.

The point about the burgers is that they were sold as beef burgers. Customers didn't know that they were adulterated with horse meat and pork. Some people don't eat pork for religious reasons and most choose not to eat old nags. The offence is mis-description and the retailers should share the responsibility.

If you want horse burgers, I doubt whether they have been withdraw from the shelves in Thailand.

The French are strange people who eat frogs legs claiming that they taste like chicken. Well, give me chicken then. They probably took to eating horse flesh during WWII when there were plenty of dead ones around.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #15 on: January 17, 2013, 08:38:20 AM »
Hey Tamun Tun and thanks - I've been well trained on here ! Seriously, it's our word and they can't have it ! Exclusively anyway. So there.

And Saf, I thought about the Archa joke but couldn't remember how to spell it !
Horse meat tastes ok but is more grainy, but I wouldn't seek it out and I don't eat burgers anyway.
As for frogs legs - no way ! Firmly in the wimp contingent on that one.
When the first rain came last year (Feb) - it was a really BIG rain here anyway - noticed many parking people on the roads around here and searching around with torches to find the happy frogs - eaten widely in Thailand of course.
Mrs Rog started putting snails on an otherwise lovely BBQ recently and I looked away ! (Quietly cussing).

Quite like the French and my nephew's 2nd wife hails from Brittany and she had her first Baby a few weeks ago at 43 ! Good Girl.

Gay day to all !

 

Online Baby Farts

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #16 on: January 17, 2013, 09:00:11 AM »
I once knew a guy who used to eat dog food on a daily basis because he said it was so cheap and tasted quite good. Then one day he died.  Apparently, he was in the middle of the road licking his balls and a truck ran him over.
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #17 on: January 17, 2013, 10:04:38 AM »
I once knew a guy who used to eat dog food on a daily basis because he said it was so cheap and tasted quite good. Then one day he died.  Apparently, he was in the middle of the road licking his balls and a truck ran him over.

I bet you wish that you could do that. Gay Parisian people, of course, lick each others.
 

Offline nookiebear

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #18 on: January 17, 2013, 10:09:08 AM »
After ordering my food in Tesco's restaurant the waitress asked ,'would you like anything else with your beefburger'......I replied 'Yes Please ,I'll have a fiver each way'
Check out my website @ www.nookiesdelights.3baht.net
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #19 on: January 17, 2013, 12:31:38 PM »
Nice one, Nookie.

It is a pity to see perfectly healthy food go to waste.  Why don't you make an offer for a job lot of the burgers.  I would then become a customer!
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #20 on: January 17, 2013, 12:32:48 PM »

I got some Tesco burgers out of the freezer earlier aaaaaaaaaaaannnnnnnnnnndddddddddd they’re off!
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Baby Farts

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2013, 12:39:09 PM »
I bet you wish that you could do that. Gay Parisian people, of course, lick each others.

If I could reach, I'd never leave the house.  George Carlin.
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #22 on: January 17, 2013, 01:07:26 PM »
How would you get a nice leg of horse into the oven?
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #23 on: January 17, 2013, 01:22:30 PM »
Just get an oven of appropriate size! And don't confine it to a leg only. When and where's the party?

Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #24 on: January 17, 2013, 01:42:00 PM »

 has to be weighed in first
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #25 on: January 17, 2013, 06:32:43 PM »
This is a devastating article from Giles Coren in the Times:-
The British and Irish food-consuming public has been deluding itself something rotten over the years, if the Tesco horsemeat scandal is anything to go by.
We’re talking here about “frozen Everyday Value beefburgers” from the country’s biggest retailer. What on earth did you think they put in them? Prime cuts of delicious free-range, organic, rare breed, heritage beef, grass-fed, Eton-educated, humanely slaughtered, dry-aged and hand-ground by fairies with a pinch of pink Murray River salt and a twist of black pepper?
Jesus, no. At those prices (you pay only £1 at Tesco for a cheeseburger complete with bun, cheese and a portion of fries), I’d have thought a mouthful of Shergar is the least of your problems.
Listen to the product name. When your first three words are “frozen”, “everyday” and “value”, that means almost by definition that the fourth word (in this case, randomly, “beef”) is to be taken with an armful of Maldon.
But what do you care? You know nothing at all about food. In surveys 80 per cent of the British public still come up surprised that a hamburger isn’t made of ham. By the time you get down to the portion of the public so stupid that you have to call it a “beefburger” to get the message across why would you bother putting any cow meat in it at all? These are people who eat ground flesh in a bun for lunch not because they especially like it, but because they don’t know how to use a knife and fork. And, frankly, if you are going to prioritise price and convenience above all things, then you darn well eat what’s put in front of you.
It’s only 29 per cent horse, for God’s sake. What do you think the other 71 per cent is? It’s sure as hell not from a beef cow I would eat. Nor the bits of it you want to think about either. At that price, you’re into scrotum, eyelid, foreskin, lungs, mechanically reclaimed connective tissue ... the sort of scrapings from the abattoir floor that could only be improved by a nice bit of horse’s arse.
Horse is good for you. It’s lean, low in cholesterol and has no history of contamination. The cheapest burgers are made from incredibly fatty beef (ground from what is left when the rich people have taken the lean cuts) and a quarter portion of pony can only give the thing a better balance.
My worry is where they get the horsemeat. Horse was synonymous with cheap food in the days when our equine economy created a mountain of surplus, beef-resembling flesh. But since the superseding of the carthorse by the car, I don’t understand where all this cheap gee-gee is coming from. Surely it would be cheaper (and tastier) to bulk out your beef products with mashings of old Volvo?

We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline Roger

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #26 on: January 17, 2013, 09:29:59 PM »
The horse bit sounds like it could be the best bit. Always try to stay away from burgers and sausages generally unless the vibes are right. Yuk !
 

sicho

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Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #27 on: January 18, 2013, 07:34:15 AM »
Tesco have decided to give away their nagburgers to poor people and others who like to eat unusual meat products. Their advertising slogan is 'Don't look a gift horse in the burger'.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: A Horse, A Horse, My Tesco for A Horse
« Reply #28 on: January 18, 2013, 02:27:51 PM »

 Nothing better than a stable diet    fur-long  healthy life
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Findus beef lasagne contained up to 100% horsemeat, FSA says ♦ video
« Reply #29 on: February 08, 2013, 11:41:23 AM »
The meat of some beef lasagne products recalled by Findus earlier this week was 100% horsemeat, the Food Standards Agency (FSA) has said.



On Monday Findus withdrew from retailers its beef lasagne in 320g, 360g and 500g sizes as a precaution.

Environment Secretary Owen Paterson said the findings were "completely unacceptable", but Findus said it did not believe it was a food safety issue.

The FSA said companies would now be required to test their beef products.

"In order to get to the bottom of this, we're going to be requiring every company to test every product line," Catherine Brown, the FSA's chief executive, told the BBC.

"If we find any other cases, we will pursue our investigations vigorously until we find out what's happened and put a stop to it."

Ms Brown said it was "highly likely" that criminal activity was to blame for horsemeat being found in some meals.

'Cannot be tolerated'
 
The FSA said Findus had tested 18 of its beef lasagne products and found 11 meals containing between 60% and 100% horsemeat.

People have been warned not to eat the products, which were made for Findus by French food supplier Comigel.

The FSA said: "We have no evidence to suggest that this is a food safety risk. However, the FSA has ordered Findus to test the lasagne for the veterinary drug phenylbutazone, or 'bute'.

Horse Meat Scandal - Findus BEEF Lasagne Meals Contain 100% Horse Meat - 7 February 2013


"Animals treated with phenylbutazone are not allowed to enter the food chain as [the drug] may pose a risk to human health.

"The Findus beef lasagne was distributed to the main UK supermarkets and smaller convenience stores. Findus has already begun a full recall of these products.

"People who have bought any Findus beef lasagne products are advised not to eat them and return them to the shop they bought them from."

Mr Paterson said the presence of unauthorised ingredients "cannot be tolerated".

"The responsibility for the safety and authenticity of food lies with those who produce it, and who sell or provide it to the final consumer. I know that food producers, retailers and caterers are as concerned as we are at the course of recent events," he said.

He said the government was working closely with businesses to "root out any illegal activity" and enforce regulations.

"Consumers can be confident that we will take whatever action we consider necessary if we discover evidence of criminality or negligence," he added.

Shadow environment secretary Mary Creagh said the latest revelations raised questions about the extent of the scandal.

"This is no longer just a food safety issue but possibly a criminal trade," she said.

Findus said the product was manufactured by a third party supplier and not by Findus. The frozen food company said all its other products had been tested and were not affected.

Findus said in a statement: "We understand this is a very sensitive subject for consumers and we would like to reassure you we have reacted immediately. We do not believe this to be a food safety issue.

"We are confident that we have fully resolved this supply chain issue.

"We would like to take this opportunity to apologise to our customers for any inconvenience caused."

National survey
 
This week supermarket chains Aldi and Tesco, as well as Findus UK, withdrew some beef products from sale after concerns were raised at their French supplier.

Comigel alerted Findus and Aldi that their products "do not conform to specification".

They advised them to remove Findus Beef Lasagne and Aldi's Today's Special Frozen Beef Lasagne and Today's Special Frozen Spaghetti Bolognese.

Tesco also decided to withdraw Everyday Value Spaghetti Bolognese.

The Tesco product was produced at the same Comigel site but there was no evidence of contamination, the supermarket said.

The wider food contamination controversy arose in mid-January when Irish food inspectors announced they had found horsemeat in some burgers stocked by a number of UK supermarket chains including Tesco, Iceland and Lidl.

Asda has withdrawn products supplied by Newry-based Freeza Meats which was storing meat found to contain a high proportion of horse DNA. Two samples were found to contain 80% horsemeat.

The horsemeat controversy has hit the Irish meat-processing industry, with a number of suppliers on both sides of the border affected.

The FSA has said it will co-ordinate a UK-wide survey of beef products to test for the possible presence of horse or pig DNA.

There will be "additional emphasis on brands at the lower end of the market, particularly for burger-type products", it said.

Twenty-eight local authorities across the UK will take a total of 224 samples, and results are due to be published in April.

The survey "aims to identify and understand factors that may lead to the presence of meat species that are not labelled as an ingredient, so that this can be explained, eliminated or correctly labelled".

source
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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