Author Topic: 'Do the RIGHT thing' - May under pressure to END state pension FREEZE for expats  (Read 469 times)

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Offline thaiga

'Do the RIGHT thing' May under pressure to END state pension FREEZE for expats

THERESA May is to be urged to “do the right thing” and end the historic injustice of freezing the state pension of British pensioners who move abroad denying them thousands of pounds. The message is due to be delivered by 93-year-old Ane Puckridge, a Second World War veteran who has the rare distinction of serving in all three branches of the armed services.

Mrs Puckridge is due to fly over from Canada to address a meeting of MPs and supporters in Westminster on 31 October which has been called to end the practice that affects 550,000 pensioners and could soon hit a million more.

She spoke to the Sunday Express ahead of the newspaper today joining the campaign to demand an end to the practice which is put through each year by a simple statutory instrument placed in the Commons after the Budget.

Mrs Puckridge pointed out that the Prime Minister had vowed on the steps of Downing Street to “end the burning injustices” in our society.

She said: “I am very, very angry about this. I will tell Theresa May to just do the right thing and pay us the pensions we worked our lives for.

“We were given no warning when we decided to move abroad because the government had cancelled the leaflets to save money.”

She moved to Canada to be near her daughter Diane Duckett in 2001 but then found that, despite working as a lecturer until she was 76, her state pension was frozen at £72.50 a week, if she had stayed in the UK it would now be £125.95.

Mrs Puckridge was only given an explanation in 2012 with the Government claiming that it was because “there is no reciprocal agreement” with Canada and some other countries.

If Mrs Puckridge lived in the USA or the EU should would receive her full state pension.

“It is deeply unfair. This money we have earned through working all our lives,” she said.

She added: “It’s been made quite clear that the government is not going to try to get reciprocal agreements t end this practice as well.”

Campaigners have pointed out that by moving abroad the pensioners are already saving the British taxpayer costs on health care and social care.

Mrs Puckridge said: “Fortunately, I have not had any health problems but I know people in my situation who have.”

An online petition supporting the campaign on Change.org organised by Mrs Puckridge’s other daughter Gillian Mittins has attracted almost 210,000 supporters.

However, senior Tory MP Sir Roger Gale, who chairs the all party group supporting the campaign and has organised the meeting later this month, has warned that with Brexit another million British pensioners who retired to countries in the EU are in danger of losing a large part of their retirement funds with the scandal.

He said: “It is obviously very unfair that somebody living one side of the US Canada border is hit by this while the person on the other side gets their full pension.

“But the government’s excuse that we need reciprocal agreements means that this problem is going to get much worse with Brexit.

“It is hard to believe that we will have 27 different reciprocal agreements with 27 different EU member states.”

He explained that British government lawyers had worried ministers by suggesting they could be forced to make back payments which would cost the taxpayer billions.

But the senior MP said: “We think there is a compromise. The Government could just start uprating pensions now and bring them back into balance.

“The issue of back payments does not necessarily need to be a block to ending this issue.”

Tory MP Peter Bone, who is also on the all party group, suggested that the current rules had shown bias against those who live in Commonwealth countries mostly Canada and Australia.

He said: “It is completely wrong that people who have earned their state pension with a lifetime of work should be denied part of it.

“But it seems very odd that currently people in EU countries get the full amount but pensioners who have moved to places like Canada and Australia do not.”

express.co.uk
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

would be a nice gesture to give the rise as inflation increases, being the interest rates as they are and prices do rise here the same as any country, even the performance with the british embassy as of late is something to be desired.

The message is due to be delivered by 93-year-old Ane Puckridge, a Second World War veteran who has the rare distinction of serving in all three branches of the armed services. bless you my dear, 17 years with no rise. her state pension was frozen at £72.50 a week, because she wanted to be with her daughter in canada, if she had stayed in the UK it would now be £125.95.

the money uk expat pensioners and others save their country is of a great amount, as in free travel, free prescriptions, free social care, shall i go on or over to the depression thread. is this problem going to get much worse with Brexit. they should be forced to make back payments.

lets hope there might be just a flicker of light at the end of the tunnel and this is what you would of got next year if you stayed in the uk.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: END state pension FREEZE for expats
« Reply #2 on: October 24, 2018, 11:17:17 AM »
and from the theguardian.com ...

War hero’s battle shows up our ‘inhumane’ frozen pensions policy

RAF veteran received a paltry £38.80-a-week state pension – because he moved to Australia

RAF war hero Harry Penny was shot down over Holland in 1943, successfully evaded capture for 10 weeks, and was awarded a military OBE. But, much later in life, he ended up engaged in a battle with the British government – over his paltry state pension. And he died knowing that he hadn’t succeeded in winning that particular skirmish.

Penny served his country with honour, but how did the UK government repay him? By freezing his basic state pension at the 1987 level of just £38.80 a week. He was effectively “punished” for emigrating to Australia, a Commonwealth country. Yet, if he had retired to Germany, the country we were at war with, and which he had bombed, he would have received up to £115.95 a week.

His 95-year-old widow Gay, who receives a basic state pension also frozen at £38.80 a week, is having to continue the fight without him.

It’s cases like this that highlight just how illogical and unfair the UK government’s “frozen pensions” policy is. Guardian Money has written about this quite a few times over the past few years, and it makes no more sense now than it did when we first covered this topic.

It occurs in more than 100 countries worldwide, including Australia, Canada, South Africa and New Zealand.

If you move to one of these places, your UK pension will be permanently frozen at the date you retire, or when you arrived, no matter how rich or poor you are, what job you did, or how much national insurance you’ve paid. But if you move to an EU country, the US, or one of a seemingly random list of places, including Macedonia and Samoa, your state pension increases in line with inflation.

There are more than half a million Brit pensioners living in countries where their basic state pension is not “uprated” each year, and campaigners say the policy is discriminatory and inhumane. Some expat pensioners had their payouts frozen at just a few pounds a week, even though the maximum basic state pension is now £125.95.

However, ministers of all colours have steadfastly refused to remedy this injustice. The government’s line is basically: yes, it’s far from ideal, but it would cost too much to sort out. Ministers have estimated that to fully uprate everyone’s frozen pensions to current levels would cost more than £500m a year. However, so-called “partial uprating” would involve a much lower upfront cost: £37m.

The case of Harry and Gay Penny (Harry died in February 2016 aged 94) is timely for two reasons: the Royal Air Force is celebrating its 100th birthday this month, and this was the week the UK hosted a major summit of Commonwealth leaders.

“My father and mother made contributions into the UK state pension even after emigrating to Australia in 1970,” Harry and Gay’s son Nick told us. “There was no correspondence to indicate the pension they received at retirement age would stay the same for life. Therefore, from 1987, the income has been ‘frozen’. It’s obviously a reasonable figure in 1987, but outrageous in 2018.”

With all those Commonwealth leaders in town, it’s no surprise campaigners upped their activities. Volunteers from the International Consortium of British Pensioners hired an advertising van to drive around the capital stating: “UK government discriminates against British Commonwealth pensioners. Commonwealth charter outlaws discrimination.” The stated aim of the Commonwealth summit is to “address the shared global challenges we face and agree actions on how to create a better future for all”.

Surely that should mean a fair deal on pensions for older Brits living overseas?
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: END state pension FREEZE for expats
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2018, 04:20:46 PM »
this is the reason given why  researchbriefings.parliament.uk

The policy of not awarding increases in some countries overseas has been followed by successive governments and continued with the introduction of the new State Pension on 6 April 2016. Essentially, the reason is cost and the desire to focus constrained resources on pensioners living in the UK.  In March 2018, Pensions Minister, Guy Opperman explained:

  The policy on uprating pensions abroad is a long-standing one of successive post-war Governments. UK State Pensions are payable worldwide, however they are up-rated overseas only where there is a legal requirement to do so.

    There are two main reasons for not paying annual up-ratings to non-residents. First, up-ratings are based on levels of earnings growth and price inflation in the UK which have no direct relevance where the pensioner is resident overseas. Second, the cost of up-rating state pensions overseas in countries where we do not currently up-rate would increase immediately by over £0.5 billion per year if all pensions in payment were increased to current UK levels. (PQ 131353, 12 March 2018)
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

The real reason is that we do not have a vote so they can ignore us in complete safety.  Morally, it is completely wrong.  If you are coming to Thailand, never rely on your pension to support yourself.
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 
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Online jivvy

They spend billions on:-
Overseas aid,
Funding refugees,
Subsidising immigrants(legal and illegal),
but refuse to take care of their own,
I'm suprised that they have not as yet found a way to reduce our overseas pensions even more
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: 'Do the RIGHT thing' - British retirees call on Malcolm Turnbull
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2018, 08:35:43 PM »
for the aussies  thewest.com.au

Mr Turnbull said he would continue to raise the issue with Britain. Shadow social services minister Jenny Macklin urged Mr Turnbull to make it a “top priority”.

Expat British retirees call on Malcolm Turnbull to end pensions freeze

Long-suffering British retirees living in Australia are calling on Malcolm Turnbull to confront British Prime Minister Theresa May over their “frozen” state pensions.

British pensions are not “uprated” in Australia, meaning they do not rise in value and are being eaten away by inflation.

But Brits who retire to the US, Europe or the Philippines have their pensions indexed automatically.

British Pensions in Australia vice-chairman Jim Tilley has asked Mr Turnbull to raise the “grossly unfair” situation with Ms May at the Commonwealth Heads of Government meeting in London in April.

“Of the 53 Commonwealth countries, 48 have their pensions frozen, so for me this is a Commonwealth issue,” Mr Tilley said. “What the Brits are doing to us is blatant discrimination. It is absolutely unfair.”

Figures provided to Federal Parliament reveal Australia would save about $90 million a year if the freeze was lifted, as British taxpayers would have to foot more of the bill.

According to Department of Social Services there are about 194,000 British pensioners living in Australia and 113,725 of them draw a part-Australian, part-British pension.

Mr Tilley said the impact of the policy was laid bare by the case of a 98-year-old retiree who moved to Australia after her husband died 40 years ago.

“She has been getting less than £20 a week since 1979, 1980,” he said. “And over that period the pension has gone up from £17 a week to £122 a week and it will be nearly £126 a week in April.”
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Do the RIGHT thing' - hope on the horizon for British retirees
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2018, 12:57:26 AM »
ray of hope


Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Freezing the pensions, not adjusting them to inflation, when somebody moves abroad, seems to be a unique British move. My insurance in Germany had once tried to reduce part of the payments to me with the argument, life in Thailand were cheaper, so I were entitled to only as much as the equivalency of costs in Thailand. But they gave up, when I threatened to sue them for formal mistakes.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Do the RIGHT thing' - END state pension FREEZE for expats
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2018, 12:33:35 PM »
a clip with a difference - enjoy the cartoons  ;)

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
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Oppo

  • Guest
nice to see a sense of humour not lost.
Where there's hope, there's life, love to see the tables turn like the backs have been turned on the old folk.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Do the RIGHT thing' - END state pension FREEZE for expats
« Reply #11 on: October 25, 2018, 09:53:06 PM »
If you are coming to Thailand, never rely on your pension to support yourself.

Retirement should be all about doing the things that make life worthwhile, what you have dreamed of and waited for all them years, not having to worry about things that you never knew the government could do, but instead some are walking hand in hand with poverty.  do senior citizens really need to have the worry put on them. not just here in thailand but 120 frozen countries where the UK government refuses to provide the annual inflationary increase for state pensions. could it be unlawfull, who knows, now the biggest worry is the brexit, new laws could be made, as it seems they do what they like, no matter where they choose to retire you should be paid the pension that they have contributed towards and are rightfully entitled to receive.

they don't stop to think actually what some folk are living on, some have savings but they don't last forever, as sterling shrinks, the way you live has to suffer. the present situation could see their lives wrecked through no fault of their own. as for turning back, impossible, expats with families, their homes are here, what they thought when coming here, a warmer, cheaper country, they will be able to survive on their state pensions. whether your home is not your own is not the problem, your money is tied up in it.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Just for information, not a suggestion:

When for example a Thai works all his life in Germany and pays in to the German retirement insurance and then moves permanently  back to Thailand for his retirement, they will also cut his pension to a so-called equivalence of a Thai pension, though he'd get full pension in Germany. But upon moving away he would be entitled to "capitalize" his pension, that means getting paid a lump sum.

I can't see any reason for the British government to deny British pensioners moving abroad the adjustments to inflation, unless there were no inflation in the country they moved to.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

bunky

  • Guest
wow thats serious even frightening, but expats are always bragging how cheap it is here,they musta listened.
start putting the money in the pot, brexit could bring anything, so what would happen if your money stopped altogether,i dread to think of the heartbreak.
what would be the worse,maybe they would allow you to have a loan,with your thai family as a guarantor to cover your ext needs.

such worrying times

bunky in luton

 

 



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