Author Topic: Healthcare demand has hospitals in Northeast close to ‘collapse’  (Read 298 times)

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Offline Newsy

nationmultimedia.com

Healthcare demand has hospitals in Northeast close to ‘collapse’

 Overcrowding at some hospitals in the Northeast has resulted in complaints about overworked staff verbally chastising people seeking treatment.

One elderly woman seeking free treatment under the universal healthcare scheme has twice been told at Khon Kaen Hospital she should be seeking help elsewhere, her son said this week.

He took his distressed mother to the hospital early Wednesday morning, only to be berated by a staff member in the X-ray department whom he described as “overwhelmed and sleep-deprived”.

The unnamed staff member claimed the hospital was so overwhelmed by people seeking free treatment that the staff was going without sleep.

He was told he should have taken his mother to a hospital closer to their home that was “as quiet as a graveyard”.

The woman was found to be suffering from an inflamed abdominal muscle, treated and released after a few hours.

 But the son said they’d gone through this on September 11 too, after a doctor at a clinic in Maha Sarakham determined that his mum’s kidney was swollen and she needed to go to Khon Kaen Hospital where she was registered.

A hospital staff member who was neither a nurse nor a doctor told his mother she should next time go to a hospital nearer her home and, if she could afford it, to a private hospital.

Wednesday’s visit was necessary because she was in severe pain, though the doctor had made a follow-up appointment for her on November 7.

Dr Thiravat Hemachudha of the Emerging Infectious Disease Health Science Centre at  Chulalongkorn Hospital in Bangkok posted photos on Facebook of a crowded ward at an unidentified hospital in the Northeast.

He cited one ward that was handling 70 to 80 patients when it was only designed for 28.

There are two healthcare teams per ward – a staff doctor, two R1 and R3 resident doctor-students, an intern, an ex-tern medical student and one or two senior medical students –  and they divide the 70 to 80 cases between them, he said.

In one afternoon on his watch, 42 new patients were admitted to a single ward, he said.

“We are reaching the near-sunken point. Despite our best effort to keep rowing, the ship will soon sink,” he wrote. “Instead of criticising the treatment, people should accept the truth of this current ‘near-collapsed’ condition.”
 

Offline Newsy

nationmultimedia.com

Hospitals not ‘collapsing’, says MD, but unhealthy lifestyles add to burden

A Bangkok doctor has dismissed claims that heavy demand for treatment has left some public hospitals close to “collapse”, especially in the Northeast.

Assistant Professor Dr Thira Woratanarat, who teaches preventive and social medicine at Chulalongkorn University, said on Facebook this week that the report, carried in The Nation, gave an inaccurate and overly dramatic description of the situation.

Thira said the problems reported stemmed from infrastructure that was inadequate to meet people’s basic healthcare needs in term of budget, manpower and equipment.

These are in short supply and inappropriately distributed, he said. Some hospital had “too much” money, manpower and equipment, others too little.

The government has exacerbated the problem with its policy of expanding public access without first determining whether it would overload the system, he said.

And the public contributes with unhealthy lifestyles, he stressed.

“If there were fewer health issues overall, the burden on the public health system would lessen,” Thira said, dismissing attempts to blame the free-of-charge universal healthcare scheme for rising demand for hospital services.

People can take four actions to help improve the situation, he said.

They can volunteer to help hospital staff or donate money or equipment.

They can take better care of their own health by refraining from alcohol, tobacco, drugs and fatty and salty foods, exercising regularly and getting an annual health check.

Third, the government should not seek to bolster the economy by promoting types of business that are not good for public health, like those involved in fast foods, alcohol and tobacco.

And finally, people and business should be more socially responsible and ensure their actions will only benefit society.
 

Offline KiwiCanadian

nationmultimedia.com

Hospitals not ‘collapsing’, says MD, but unhealthy lifestyles add to burden

A Bangkok doctor has dismissed claims that heavy demand for treatment has left some public hospitals close to “collapse”, especially in the Northeast.


Third, the government should not seek to bolster the economy by promoting types of business that are not good for public health, like those involved in fast foods, alcohol and tobacco.


This guy missed a few others that should have been on the list, sugars, MSG, preservatives, Herbicides, Insecticides etc.
 

 



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