Author Topic: 'Mai Pen Rai'  (Read 3065 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline thaiga

'Mai Pen Rai'
« on: February 19, 2016, 01:28:03 AM »
'Mai Pen Rai'

mai pen rai being one of the most-used sayings by Thai people.

But what does it actually mean, anyone know, is it, it’s okay or does it mean don’t worry or whatever.

I wonder what the english version would be, something like , no worries ole son.

Oh! never mind. Mai Pen Rai.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Aussie

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #1 on: February 19, 2016, 05:14:33 AM »
Hello thaiga.Mai pen rai is most commonly used as an equivalent to English phrases like “you’re welcome” or “don’t mention it”, and it’s often heard as a response to “thank you”. But mai pen rai carries deeper meaning than this. When asked to translate it into English, one Thai replied, “It’s okay… everything is okay… don’t worry”.

Thai is a tonal language, and this is one instance where the tone (falling in this case) seems to have an uncanny alignment to the sentiment behind the phrase. Mai pen rai is normally spoken in a casual, warm, reassuring way, with each of the syllables verbalized in a soft, descending harmony.

Thais are remarkably resilient in their quests to not get stressed out. “I’m going to be 20 minutes late for work? Mai pen rai, it’s no reason to rush”. “That motorbike just came centimetres away from hitting me? Mai pen rai, no harm done.” “My entire house is flooded with two metres of dark, stinky water and crocodiles are raiding my kitchen? Mai pen raaaaaaaiiiiii, there’s nothing I can do about it, and besides, the crocodiles are hungry.” It’s an enviable mental tactic that one could argue deflects responsibility, on the one hand, or allows space for acceptance of whatever might be happening, on the other.

Mai pen rai can also be translated as “never mind“, and in this sense it relates to the Thai cultural conviction that people don’t have much control over things, a belief that probably stems from Buddhist teachings on impermanence and karma. The actions of others and even one’s own thoughts and feelings are believed to be mostly out of one’s control, so — mai pen rai – just accept and move on. It’s reminiscent of the famous Spanish phrase, que sera sera, “whatever will be, will be.”
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes
 
The following users thanked this post: thaiga

Offline Baby Farts

  • posting on moderation row
  • Korat forum specialist
  • *
  • Posts: 3351
  • Thanked: 179 times
  • Karma: 0
  • Seeek!
Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2016, 06:50:47 AM »
Thaiga....Simply put, it means, "Forget about it."  ;D

Seriously, Aussie has nailed it 100%.  Perfect definition as is covers such a broad spectrum.
 
The following users thanked this post: thaiga

Offline takeitor

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2016, 08:12:02 AM »
All the below is most informative.  If I had to pick a single, all-encompassing translation of Mai Pen Rai it would be the the Australian usage of "No worries"...as made international by Crocodile Dundee.
 
The following users thanked this post: thaiga

Offline Aussie

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2016, 08:49:11 AM »
Yes takeitor.  No worries mate.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes
 

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2016, 12:39:06 PM »
Great answers guys, but .........

My entire house is flooded with two metres of dark, stinky water and crocodiles are raiding my kitchen?

I think i would have done a Flanagan and Allen Run rabbit run

Flanagan and Allen - Run Rabbit Run.wmv

credit@SpazzMay
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Sabai Dee Mai
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2016, 11:23:32 AM »
Hey Aussie travelfish.org have copied your post, very saucy of them ;)

sabai dee mai

Moving on from 'Mai Pen Rai' we seem to have got that one sorted. We all know what mai chai means, no yes. As in post

what about  "sabai dee mai"

What does "sabai dee mai" mean, dee means good so is it, are you well, i think sabai means happy.

Very confusing as mai sabai does not mean sad, it could mean sick, anyone know. then there's the saying, sabai sabai, wellness beyond words.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline takeitor

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2016, 11:50:29 AM »
Ok Mr T, you've asked for it...

"Sabai" will be translated in a dictionary as "Comfortable" but as you point out, the meaning changes somewhat when combines in a phrase, such as:

"Sabai dee mai" / Pen yang-ai:  How are you?

"Sabai dee": Well / Fine

"Mai cor-ee sabai"/"Mai sabai":  Not very well / Unwell

"Dee jai":  Happy (at this moment)

"Me kwam sook":  Happy (long term)

Hope this all helps you to "me kwam sook maak!"
 
The following users thanked this post: thaiga

Offline Aussie

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2016, 04:12:03 PM »
thaiga I copied the info relating to "Mai pen rai" from travel fish, they not from me.  It was the best translation that I could find.  Thanks for bringing that to my attention.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes
 
The following users thanked this post: thaiga

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #9 on: February 20, 2016, 06:10:11 PM »
aussie, Silly me i thought they copied your post and put it on there site (a little joke) everything is copied on the internet or we'd have no news
so "Mai pen rai"    & thanks for the reply.  :cheers


Yes Takeitor, i was ready for that and was waiting for your reply. "Sabai Sabai"  I wonder  what this songs about

Bird Thongchai McIntyre - Sabai Sabai

credit@capiloton
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline dawn

Re: Sabai Dee Mai
« Reply #10 on: February 21, 2016, 12:11:36 PM »

We all know what mai chai means, no yes.

thaiga i hope your not knocking the thai people with mai chai.  no yes is correct but meaning, not quite right or no cannot do.
so it is not as stupid as it sounds. yes no
the earliest light of day
 

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #11 on: February 21, 2016, 06:24:18 PM »
How odd an article in bangkok.coconuts.co. seem to think

It’s not okay: What Thais really mean by “Mai Pen Rai”
 
It isn’t just a phrase, but rather a cultural symbol and even a philosophy for Thailand. They say the three syllables roughly translate to “it’s okay” or “don’t worry”

Like being offered the last piece of cake that you would love to eat, but the polite response would be “mai pen rai”.

As in [THINKS]: Yes, I want the pizza! But says: “Mai pen rai ” When answering a yes-no question, and they want to say yes, Thais often opt for mai pen rai. This is because Thais have a habit of rejecting help or an offer simply because they don’t want to cause trouble or inconvenience to that person.

What farangs think mai pen rai means

So now let’s look at how foreigners understand this phrase. Despite the friendliness and unselfishness that Thais try to show by using mai pen rai, foreigners often misunderstand the meaning of the phrase. Some interpret it as “let it go” and “whatever,” while others even think it doesn’t mean anything at all. The following are just a few of their interpretations.

lots more here: bangkok.coconuts.co
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai' - Customer services
« Reply #12 on: March 09, 2016, 03:44:59 PM »
Customer services - Mai Pen Rai

A bit more on the saying "Mai Pen Rai" found on linkis.com. How some Thais deal with Customer Complaints, again not a knock at the thais, but may help some understand if in the given situation.

Carol Hollinger wrote a great book on Thai culture – Mai Pen Rai Means Never Mind – which captured precisely the Thais’ inclination to treat nothing too seriously, to avoid conflict, and to not take individual responsibility.

Such a lay-back attitude can result in a very comfortable existence and a stress-free lifestyle. Tourists see this from the first moment they set foot in the Land of Smiles. What they don’t see is the negative side of mai pen rai. Problem situations don’t get addressed for fear of upsetting someone.

It can be frustrating when a Thai just “turns off” and won’t listen to what may be a very valid comment or complaint. Thinking of how to resolve the problem may have been better and is a better business model if a business wants to keep customers happy and loyal.

They may even tell their friends of the excellent service received from the company. But Thais don’t seem too bothered about repeat business. They’d rather make one sale, bank the cash, and make 1000 baht profit on a single transaction than make two sales with a profit of 700 baht each – even though the total profit of 1400 baht is more than the single profit of 1000 baht.

Business models and the way entrepreneurs think differ between the West and the East. I’ve seen market traders who have made no sales of fresh vegetables that day, keep their prices unchanged even at the end of trading when they are about to pack up.

No stall holder trader wants to establish a reputation for reducing prices at close of business as then customers will wait for that opportunity every day. But never reducing a price, making no sales, and suffering a loss if stock then has to be written off taking a loss does not make sense. You can observe this yourself if you watch carefully.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: UP TO YOU
« Reply #13 on: April 02, 2016, 12:19:45 PM »
UP TO YOU

Up to you is heard so many times in thailand, but what does it actually mean. It is spoken by foreigners and thai alike.

Does it really mean, it's up to you, or is it being sarcastic and mean, I don’t want you to do that.

answers well that's up to you
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
The following users thanked this post: sowhat

Online Taman Tun

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #14 on: April 02, 2016, 12:29:43 PM »
The way my wife uses it:- I don’t want you to do that
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline dryftr

  • Korat forum newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 1
  • Karma: 0
  • Newbie
Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #15 on: April 03, 2016, 11:50:33 AM »
"It's up to you" in Thai would be "Dam Jai" not to be confused with "Jai Dam"(black heart). It can mean just that; it's up to you, or can be used sarcastically (as in I don't want you to do it but can't stop you) All depending on the tone and situation. Thai is a "flexible" language
 

Offline dawn

Re: 'Mai Pen Rai'
« Reply #16 on: April 03, 2016, 12:25:51 PM »
the tone of voice it is said in would give you some indication as to what is meant
or up to you could be giving you the decision to choose
the earliest light of day
 

 



Thailand
Statistics