Author Topic: What really makes thailand what it is  (Read 1482 times)

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Offline thaiga

What really makes thailand what it is
« on: August 23, 2016, 04:20:56 PM »
Thai people love to eat

What really makes thailand what it is, yes i know, food vendors and such take up a lot of room on the so called pavement and you have to step out in the road to pass. But ain't that all part of thailand, tables n chairs out on the road and people noshing away at their grub.

An article from the bbc.com. (below) headed bangkoks disappearing street food, the city is steadily sweeping the sidewalks clean of its vendors. Will all these clean up campaigns make thailand lose it's character and be less appealing to visitors. I would rather see the colorful spread of exotic flowers and delicious food, than them clearing the area just to put another mall or maybe a condo there. Is it all about money, the price of the land and the power people.

                   

Bangkok Street Food. Night and Day Around the Stalls in the Markets. Thailand


Although street food has long been synonymous with Bangkok, the city is steadily sweeping the sidewalks clean of its vendors.

For decades, Soi 38, Bangkok’s famed foodie haunt on Sukhumvit Road, was a carnival of colours, smells and sounds. Nearly every night, woks sizzled and the narrow road overflowed with roving eaters lining their stomachs for long nights out. Under bright yellow lamps, street vendors served stewed pork knuckle, oily chicken rice and plate after plate of piquant pad thai.

But when the owner of this land passed away in 2014, his family sold it to a property development firm and construction of a luxury condominium got underway. Today, instead of the symphony of backpackers, families and young Thai couples filling up at foldable tables, the raspy cry of cranes and backhoes floods the air. While a few vendors remain, the writing is on the wall for this hallowed street food destination.

The demise of Soi 38 isn’t unique. Over the past year, the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration has evicted nearly 15,000 vendors from 39 public areas citywide, part of a campaign to tidy up the streets and pavements. Vendors along the whole of Sukhumvit Road, from Soi 1 to Bang Na, have been told they must vacate by 5 September. Meanwhile, guidebook go-tos, such as the On Nut Night Market, the Saphan Lek Market in the Old Town and the Khlong Thom Market in Chinatown, as well as vendors along Siam, Sathorn and Silom Roads, have all faced the axe over the past two years, a rapidly unfolding consequence of social, economic and environmental pressures.

Cleaning up the city – in particular, relieving its choked traffic by removing rogue vendors from walkways and narrow side streets – has long been a talking point of politicians on the campaign trail. Until the junta seized power in May 2014, however, none had made good on their promises. With military officers given substantial, wide-reaching policing power, while the police themselves also patrol the streets, such edicts now resonate loudly.

In On Nut, a residential neighbourhood popular among expats, a well-loved, ramshackle night market closed in October 2015 when the owner of the land sold the prime property next to Bangkok’s iconic BTS sky train to a developer. As in Thong Lo, a condominium will soon stand in its place. Panida “Poupée” Pethanom, who served gourmet hamburgers from her Burgers and Bangers stall, said she expected the land to be sold eventually, although the two-week eviction notice came as a jolt.


On Nut was a well-loved night market that closed in October 2015 (Credit: Aroon Thaewchatturat/Alamy)

To be continued ...
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #1 on: August 24, 2016, 12:29:18 PM »
They all want a bit of the action

My views, although it is the right thing to do, evict people who have plotted up on someone else's land, you must ask yourself first, How long have they been there, did they get a nod and a wink to be there, have they been paying a fee and of course they are working people.

It's a regular event to hear in the news or on tv that resorts have been torn down, as they were erected on someone else's land, But someone must have seen theses buildings going up, personally i wouldn't put up a resort on someone else's land, without a nod and a wink to do so, if you get my drift. So the people overseeing this, shouldn't they be made to pay compensation to the resort owners.

Getting back to the street markets, in the local village markets you will see the old girls proudly looking up at you smiling with a couple of teeth left in their head, selling some produce they have grown in their own garden and earning a few bht. That is the real thailand to me. If you want to wander around a mall you can do that in your own country, The tourism industry we're told is busting at the seams, why change what people come to see. Don't fix the car if it ain't broke. A bit more from the beeb (post below)

                 

Udon Thani อุดรธานี - Early Morning Market


Another top tourist landmark, Pak Khlong Talad, the sprawling riverside warren in the Old Town better known as the Flower Market, has also felt the effects of gentrification. One of the market’s warehouses has been transformed into an as-yet-unfinished community mall called Yodpiman River Walk, with tourist shops, cafes and restaurants. The vendors on the footpath in front of it, who sold vibrant marigolds, roses and orchids, as well as noodles, stewed duck and pork satay, have been evicted. Their wooden tables have been replaced by yellow tents inside of which city inspectors known as tessakij keep vigil, cracking down on rule-breaking vendors with greater gravity than ever before.

“When foreigners hear ‘Flower Market’, they think of beautiful bright colours and lots of activity,” said Sathaporn Kosachan, who, with his partner Suchanat Pa-obsin, sold khanom jeen (rice noodles with curry) at the Flower Market for 20 years. “But now it’s, ‘What is this? Where is the market?’ They expect to see something different from what they can see in Europe or Japan. They want to see the flowers, the food, the vendors, because it’s exotic, but all the vendors have been separated and now many have left.”

Pongphop Songsiriarcha, assistant editor of local lifestyle magazine Bangkok 101 and lifelong resident of the Pak Khlong Talad neighbourhood, has also noticed a loss of diversity on the streets.

“Around the corner from my house, you used to be able to find yam [a tangy, spicy and savoury salad], chicken rice and so much more, but it’s all gone. Even gaeng massaman [a classic Thai curry] is not very easy to find now,” he said.

Less diversity not only means fewer choices for the on-the-go working class, who eat out more often than they cook at home, but it also means that less common dishes – such as pad galamphlee (cabbage stir-fried with fish sauce) and savoury flower-shaped snacks called cho muang – are at risk of disappearing from the streets and fading from public consciousness.

Yet perhaps the greatest loss the city stands to face if its street food scene gentrifies – or vanishes – is its unique coming together of cultures and classes. The street stall is one of few places where businesspersons can mingle with the people who clean toilets and drive taxis. Sitting on the same plastic stools, everyone slurps the same noodle soups with well-worn chopsticks and bent spoons. But if 100-baht food court meals become the cheapest eats available, then the divide between haves and have-nots seems fated to expand, with blue-collar workers effectively priced out.

                 

Food is so tightly woven into the fabric of Thai culture that any threat to it, perceived or actual, tends to elicit powerful emotional responses. But lost among the outcries is one thing that might be street food’s saviour: urban planning, a relatively new concept to Bangkok.

“Street food is Bangkok’s treasure. We cannot lose it,” said Dr Nattapong Punnoi, business development director of the Urban Design & Development Center, a four-year-old organisation launched by Chulalongkorn University that aims to restore and develop urban areas. Punnoi agreed that a number of vendors operate illegally, block footpaths or don’t clean their messes well, compounding the megacity’s litter and pollution problems.

“We need proper planning to implement sustainable changes,” he explained, adding that Bangkok has roughly 28,800 hectares of space that could be sustainably developed: abandoned railyards, unused private land, promising spots hidden beneath highways and overpasses. All could incorporate street food in such a way that connects patrons with the spaces as well as each other.

“Around town, we’re seeing a lot of community malls opening – small malls with restaurants and shops – where you can buy Japanese products and eat Italian food, for example,” Punnoi said. “One of the suggestions we make to these organisations is that they make space to accommodate aspects of Thai street life, such as food vendors. [Our street life] is a magnet, especially for tourists. It brings people to their destinations and gets them coming back.”

With this in mind, and with support from the Bangkok Metropolitan Administration, the Urban Design & Development Center is currently restoring or reviving 15 historic sites across town – including a flagship site at Tha Din Daeng on the Chao Phraya riverside – in the lead-up to the city’s 250th anniversary.

For the Tha Din Daeng project, the Urban Design & Development Center organised town hall-style discussions, connecting community leaders with activists, academics and property developers. According to Punnoi, although common in the West, this sort of all-inclusive communication is rare in Bangkok. Its application is timely, however. By rallying support from all parties for places that might fall victim to gentrification, they’ve managed to save iconic food spots like Thanusingha Bakery, a small shop where a very local sweet called khanom farang kudee jeen (an egg-based cake influenced by Portuguese and Chinese settlers) has been made for more than a century.

“What we are doing now may not exactly be a picture of the future, but it’s a good starting point,” Punnoi said. “We’re trying to [piece together] the right activity in the right place at the right time – it’s an exciting time to be involved with this.”

bbc.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Baby Farts

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #2 on: August 25, 2016, 08:01:10 AM »
Even if you have a chanot,  some Thai can camp out on your land and declare it their land after being there for a certain amount of years.. How fcked up is that? Maybe, I'll have my wife camp out at The Mall. Lol.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #3 on: August 25, 2016, 11:58:27 AM »
The new generation

Is the real thailand getting lost with the new generation, like most of our countries back home, that have lost there true identity, what with politically correct britain with all it's new laws. What happens here, when the old folk, like the old dears that you see selling their wares in the market are gone, the old folk that work in the fields, who is going to take there place. The scooter boys, yea right. Where they gonna get their money for gasoline or whatever when yi is no longer here, i dread to think.

Is it changing already, This week alone, we hear the news in pattaya of bar girls stabbing work mates in the face with a broken bottle and kids at the age of 14 and 17 killing a transgender and hiding the body under the bed in a hotel, Shocking, where are their parents, do they care, letting their kids roam the streets of all places like pattaya, or have they lost control over them.

                 

I kinda like the clip below, an old fashioned method of cultivation, The traditional way, for some it is hard to convince them to try more modern and easier methods. When we eat the rice, We don't give it a second thought of how much hard work went into it, for very little returns, but if there is no rainfall at the right time, then there is no return for the hard work and labour that went into it.

Thailand Rice Cultivation, Start - Finish
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Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #4 on: August 26, 2016, 01:41:41 PM »
Here is today's sermon ;)

Khao San Road

They claim Khao San is a famous tourist spot and street vending there is a magnet and a charm that attract tourist visits.

Yet they want to restrict trading hours, 6.00 pm to midnight on Thursday to Sunday, these traders are people who want to work and it will affect their earnings, and maybe in the long run even the economy of the country.

The famous Khaosan Road in Bangkok, famous for street vendors selling delicious food and foot wear ect ect. and very popular with back packers. Lined with bars and restaurants, its an ideal place to sit and watch the world go by, or walk around and take in the sights and sounds. Be a shame for tourists who come back again for another great time and it's not the same.

           

Bangkok Street Food. The Fabulous Stalls of Khao San Road
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Online Baby Farts

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #5 on: August 26, 2016, 06:52:36 PM »
Heh.  I certainly didn't come to Thailand for the food from the street vendors......Come to think of it..... Never mind.  I better not go there.  ;D There are lot's of delicious things to eat in Thailand.  ;)
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #6 on: August 26, 2016, 07:02:53 PM »
Heh.  I certainly didn't come to Thailand for the food from the street vendors......Come to think of it..... Never mind.  I better not go there.  ;D There are lot's of delicious things to eat in Thailand.  ;)
Bit like the weather, when it's wet it's time to go inside ;D

                                                                                :cheers
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
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Online Baby Farts

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #7 on: August 27, 2016, 11:35:15 AM »
Bit like the weather, when it's wet it's time to go inside ;D

                                                                                :cheers

thaiga.  You made me spit my coffee out again from laughter. LOL :lol :lol :lol
 

Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #8 on: August 27, 2016, 12:49:52 PM »
What really makes thailand what it is

Don't get me wrong i love this country, even more than my own. the good outways the bad by a longshot and one of the main attractions is, you never know what your gonna see next, just when you think you have seen it all, something else pops up to make you utter the words, OMG. Things that you would never see elsewhere. Like a train running through a market.

Why do the tourists keep coming, because there is always something different to see, so many unique destinations that it would take you years to see them all, Thailand caters for all types of budgets from backpackers to the quality tourist. We are all different in our likes and dislikes, myself i like to do what i want, at what time i want, so do a lot of people, that's why they come. so if you start closing bars early and put restrictions on things, i would think you would lose some tourism. Who wants to be jigging around having a great time in a disco, then the lights go on and your asked to pi*s in a plastic cup, I suppose it will give you something to talk about when you get back home. (Yea the cup overflowed)  :o

           

All the years i have lived here i still never get fed up with thai food, especially Isaan there is so much to choose from and the price is next to nothing, how do some thais stay so thin i will never know.

One thing that amuses me is the Thai language, some words sound the same as others, bit like Korea (clip below) Take the word 'ma' for instance, it can mean dog, horse or come here, all depending on the tone it is said in. Great fun and self satisfaction when you get it right and are understood. Never a bored moment here.

Please Give Me Coke - Korean Translation Fail
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #9 on: August 28, 2016, 01:01:57 PM »
What really makes thailand what it is

Thailand is an easy place to live and to move around in, you'll always find a bus, tuk tuk, or somebody to take you where you want to go. If your hungry and it's two in the morning, your still find places to eat, if you need a pharmacy, the same applies.

We've not mentioned THE THAI FEMALES yet, so here we go, there are some real pretty girls here and is one of the main attractions for some. A girlfriend or even a wife, or just window shopping, it's all here, Thailand has a vast amount of lovelies.
Of course you have to be careful what your doing, or you might find the girl of your choice has a bigger dick than you, :-[ that'll upset you.

           

There are some good honest bargirls, they are not all gold diggers, although you hear of some horrendous stories, where the guy has been wiped out of his money and whatever. but you never hear much of the successful marriage stories. Why's that, is it because farangs don't admit to marrying a lady of the night, so you wouldn't know, anyway. I have noticed the religious girls seem to go the distance
When given money and a home, who do they thank, :wai i'll leave you to work that one out. Nuff said.

The thai smile amazes me (clip below is a classic)

You go into a shop to buy something and the shop owner seems to take great delight, with a big smile on his face to tell you that he just sold the last one, relax guys he ain't making fun of you, thais smile when they feel embarrassed, in a difficult situation where they can't do anything about it, could be a way of not losing face.
Understanding, although that's not always easy, is half the battle. So If you’re not sure what to do or how to behave in a certain situation, just look at what the Thais are doing and copy them, unless it's driving a car of course. ::)

Thai Smile
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: What really makes thailand what it is
« Reply #10 on: September 01, 2016, 07:15:18 PM »
What really makes thailand what it is - apart from the butt blaster ;D

I will tell you, the cut switch out on our electricity box at home was faulty and not functioning as it should.
There's a guy in our soi that people say he is good and reasonable at the electrics, he dismantled the faulty switch. took it into town on his motorcycle, found a new switch, returned with an invoice of 430 bht, worked an hour on live feed coming in from the mains and charged me 200 bht for the labour and 100 bht gasoline. That's What really makes thailand what it is.

But in the Uk
I can remember years ago calling in a plumber as the central heating pump packed up. "Yer pumps ad it mate" he said. can you fit a new one i replied, "arr you'd need an electrician in first to dismantle the live side, then i'll fit yer pump an e'll ave to come back and link it up again"

That was years ago, apparently your not allowed to put a socket, plug or whatever, unless you have the qualifications of an electrician.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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