Author Topic: Thousands of prisoners released 'to ease crowding in jails  (Read 477 times)

Offline thaiga

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Thousands of prisoners released 'to ease crowding in jails

The release of nearly 8,000 inmates in recent months is aimed at reducing the crowdedness inside prisons, Corrections Department director-general Narat Sawettanan said on Thursday (April 16).

Narat said that they were released gradually over six months. In October 2019, 1,261 were released, 1,167 in November, 1,317 in December, 1,377 in January, 903 in February, and 1,865 in March , totalling 7,890.

He said the release of those inmates was based on specific criteria: They must have already served two-thirds of the sentence and they must have shown excellent behaviour in order to be considered for early release, or,

they must have served one-third of the term and be elderly, aged 70 or older, or have some illness or disability. These people must undergo an assessment to evaluate their inability to take care of themselves and the tendency for repeated offences in order to be approved. However, relatives must sign an agreement to patronise them during the probation process until the end of the sentence.

However, if the offender repeatedly commits or violates the conditions, the suspension will be revoked and they will be sent back to prison for the remaining part of the sentence.

nationthailand.com
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Offline thaiga

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Re: Thousands of prisoners released 'to ease crowding in jails
« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2020, 01:35:57 PM »
Ex-prisoner homelessness risk rebuked

Most of those released from prison on parole immediately return home, while only a few become stranded or end up as vagrants, Corrections Department chief Naras Savestanan said on Wednesday.

He was commenting on claims by a homeless advocacy group that many ex-convicts had joined the ranks of the homeless.

The department earlier said it was releasing about 8,000 inmates early on suspended sentences to ease overcrowding in jails during the pandemic.

Pol Col Naras said most of the people released from prison immediately travel to their hometown, adding they are usually accompanied by their family or relatives.

In those cases where a former inmate's home is far away, or those released on bail are unable to get to their home before the 10pm curfew, he said the department had prepared accommodation for them.

Pol Col Naras also said the Department of Probation had measures in place to officer them support. Prisoners who have no relatives are a different story.

"Although they have money provided for travel expenses, as well as clothes donated to them from outside agencies, they might have nowhere to go," Pol Col Naras said.

He added that it is possible they will live alone. "There might be some ex-prisoners without relatives who do end up as vagrants. But that does not happen in large numbers.

"Some ex-prisoners accompanied by their relatives back home do not stay, as they are rejected by society and unable to find work," said Pol Col Naras, adding that such cases are not common.

Food as well as accommodation under the Department of Probation and the Ministry of Social Development and Human Security are available for those who need to travel long distances, or otherwise need a place to take shelter during the curfew period.

Moreover, an ex-inmate who does not have travel expenses can also use money from the inmate welfare fund or Phibun Songkhro Foundation to get home, he said.

bangkokpost.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

 



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