Author Topic: The Lincolnshire Rectangle  (Read 351 times)

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Online Taman Tun

The Lincolnshire Rectangle
« on: September 21, 2018, 03:21:11 PM »
Everyone has heard of the Bermuda Triangle but a far more significant part of the earth’s surface is contained within the Lincolnshire Rectangle.

The Lincolnshire Rectangle is only 4km from east to west and 12km from north to south. Grantham lies at the north end with Woolsthorpe by Colsterworth to the South.  This small area of land has been very influential in the world ever since the late 1600s.

The story starts in 1643 with the birth of Isaac Newton at Woolsthorpe by Colsterworth.  Isaac was sent to the Kings School in Grantham until the age of 16 when he was called back to help on the family farm.  His heart wasn’t in farming and he was soon despatched back to Grantham after he let the sheep get out and eat all the neighbour’s crops.  At the end of his studies he gained a place at Cambridge University where his real work began.  He did much work on the study of light and optics. (https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Opticks). But his main work was focused on Laws of Motion, Gravitation and Laws of Planetary Motion.  His research in this area was published in 1687 (https://archive.org/stream/newtonspmathema00newtrich/newtonspmathema00newtrich_djvu.txt)
In 1846, just over 200 years after Newton’s birth a French mathematician, Urbain Le Verrier, used Newton’s Laws of Planetary Motion to work out the orbit of an unseen planet which was clearly slightly disturbing the motions of the other planets.  Le Verrier sent his calculations to an Observatory in Berlin and told the astronomers which point in the sky to look.  Sure enough the astounded astronomers saw a planet in the middle of their field of view. This is the planet Neptune.  However, in 1852 some cracks began to appear in The Laws of Planetary Motion.  The orbit of the planet Mercury had a slight wobble which could not be explained by the Laws.  This was not resolved until Einstein came along with his concept of a universal maximum speed limit of the speed of light (Newton assumed no speed limit).  So, thanks to Newton, alls well in the world and the earth continues to orbit the sun.

The next significant event in the Lincolnshire Rectangle came in 1925 when Margaret Hilda Thatcher (May peace be upon her) was born in Grantham.  It is not possible to list all her achievements in a single post but worth recording that she defeated militant trade unionism and played a significant part in ending the Cold War.

Bermuda Triangle? No, the Lincolnshire Rectangle is the only one for me.



We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Lincolnshire Rectangle
« Reply #1 on: September 21, 2018, 04:05:10 PM »
Lots of events happened in that area, Lincolnshire Rectangle it is,  love the countryside in the clip below, as fo maggie bless her, is this where the
Chief Whip was invented ;)

Very little connected to Margaret Thatcher's legacy comes without an argument. The claim by the bishop of London in his funeral address that the former scientist was "part of the team that invented Mr Whippy ice-cream" is no exception. The New Scientist reported in July 1983, as Thatcher was elected a fellow of the Royal Society body of scientists, that she had worked "developing emulsifiers for ice-creams for Joe Lyons from 1949-51". thats theguardian.com 2013

A Visit to Isaac Newton's Home
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Lincolnshire Rectangle
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2018, 12:37:22 PM »
Lincolnshire Battlefields

We may tend to think of Lincolnshire as a sleepy backwater, but several times in history it's played a vital role in deciding the fate of the nation....

21st October 1939

The war is only a few weeks old, and already there's been some enemy action over the county. This particular day is recreated in the old operations room at RAF Digby, where it was originally controlled from. The Luftwaffe attacked two convoys which were passing in opposite directions off the Lincolnshire coast, and Spitfires were scrambled to see them off - result RAF 7, Luftwaffe nil. Not really a battle I know (especially as it was Spitfires versus seaplanes), but it symbolises the vital role Lincolnshire played in establishing British air power in the Second World War. bbc.co.uk

RAF Digby
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: The Lincolnshire Rectangle
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2018, 08:28:54 PM »
USAF Folkingham was quite an interesting place: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAF_Folkingham

Not to mention the following:
RAF Scampton
RAF Cranwell
RAF Conningsby
Etc etc
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

Offline thaiga

Re: The Lincolnshire Rectangle
« Reply #4 on: September 22, 2018, 09:40:33 PM »
The Lincolnshire Triangle - From Newton to Thatcher and so much more - like the Stenigot tower and what about the 1500 sheep that disappeared :o

Many people have reported seeing UFOs in Lincolnshire. The sightings have been concentrated in the north east section of the county, centred around a town called Louth. Eric Goring of Brinkhill who regularly takes late night walks in this remote area has witnessed black triangular craft performing impossible maneuvers in total silence. In January 2009 the famous wind turbine incident occurred where a 65 foot blade from a wind turbine fell off during the night when a UFO was spotted by multiple witnesses over the wind farm. In September 2011 in the same region, 1500 sheep disappeared from a field on a single night without trace. Richard D. Hall investigates the evidence to determine if the sheep abduction could be UFO related. Strap in tight for the investigation into ... The Lincolnshire Triangle

people have reported seeing UFOs in Lincolnshire, skip the vid to 4:00
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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