Author Topic: Petanque in Thailand  (Read 156 times)

Online Taman Tun

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Petanque in Thailand
« on: March 29, 2020, 12:08:37 PM »
For the past year or so, I have been working in the MRTA compound near Phra Ram 9 road.  I was quite surprised to see a petanque court between two of the buildings used by an enthusiastic group of Thai players.  I know there are a number of French guys working in the compound so I wrongly assumed that they had introduced the game to the Thais.  However, a quick search on the internet revealed that petanque had reached Thailand by a much more interesting route.  As a petanque court is only 4m x 15m, I am thinking of installing one at home as I think we are going to need something to keep us occupied during the coming weeks. 
Here is the history of petanque in Thailand which I have shamelessly plagiarized from the “Petanque in Phuket” website:-
Who would have thought that Thailand is the second largest petanque nation after France? Two people have made a significant contribution to the fact that this has happened: Dr. Sribhumi Sukhanetr , the first president of the Thai petanque association and a member of the board of the FIPJP, and Princess Srinagarindra , mother of today's monarch Bhumibol Adulyadej.
Dr. Sribhumi Sukhanetr studied in Paris and got to know and love boules there. He was enthusiastic about petanque and had the vision that this sport would find good conditions in Thailand. He first played in Thailand with a group of students who all studied in France and got to know pétanque there. There was only one problem, you had few balls, or at least not enough to be able to address a larger circle. Then he had an idea. His friend was a police officer with the royal family in Bangkok. He gave him his last 12 balls with the request to hand them over to the royal family and to ask for an audience. This was also granted to him and he was able to present his idea and vision.
Now the queen mother comes into play. At the age of only 29, Princess Srinagarindra (1900-1995) was Prince Mahidol Adulyadej, a young widow and single mother of three, after the early death of her husband. She lived with her children in Thailand for 4 years, then she decided to move to Lausanne, Switzerland in 1933, so that their children could get a better and adequate modern education there. During this time, when she also went on trips to neighboring France and Provence, you also got to know how to play with balls.
She was an athletic person and it is said that she played petanque almost every day until she was over 90 years old.
So Sukhanetr had a strong advocate and the petanque game was recommended by the royal family, the game of better society, the officials, the bankers. In 1976 she initiated the first tournament and in the same year the Thai association was founded. In 1995 she put 1 million bath in a fund for the development of petanque in Thailand. She started playing at the age of 30 and enthusiastically did so even when she was over 90. She said: “ Petanque needs less investment than other sports. It is a sport for all ages, young and old have fun at the same time and it is a sport for all genders, in which one does not need any special physical strength ” . In her direct surroundings at the court, she organized triplet tournaments. Officers and officers, security guards and secretaries, workers and servants - everyone was allowed to play with the Queen Mother. From her visits to Switzerland, she always brought many plastic balls with her, which she distributed during her visits to schools across the country. She said that when children play petanque, they use the time well!
The military also has its own sports company in Thailand, where Pétanque is on the roster every day. To date, the participants in the World Championships are in the military service.

The sister of King Bhumipol Adulyadej, who died in 2016, was present at the 1999 Youth World Cup in Phuket and opened the games with a gong strike. She did not miss the first game, it was Thailand against France. To date, Thailand has hosted four world championships: the World Cup Triplettes in Chiang Mai and in 2007 in Pattaya in 2007, the Youth Cup in Phuket in 1999 and the World Cup Women in Suphanburi in 2009.
Thailand has already joined the FIPJP as the 17th member and is today with over 40,000 - other sources speak of over 80,000 - licensed players with a large lead over FIPJP in second place. But even after the successes, Thailand ranks second behind France with 14 gold, 9 silver and 10 bronze medals. In addition, our 3 silver and 3 bronze medals look quite modest.
In 1997, two years after the queen mother's death, the Asian Petanque and Sports Boules Confederation was founded. Thailand, along with Vietnam and Laos (two former French colonies), was one of the founding members. Cambodia, Singapore, Malaysia, Pakistan, Iran, Japan, India, Bhutan and Indonesia are also members today.
If the old only could, if the young only knew.

Offline thaiga

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Re: Petanque in Thailand
« Reply #1 on: March 29, 2020, 12:59:35 PM »
thanks for that t.t, nice to get away from the usual, bla bla.  :salute  simmilar to Bocce Ball. do you realy need to build, maybe just mark an area out.

for those that haven't got the balls for it, you can use coconuts



Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline thaiga

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Re: Petanque in Thailand
« Reply #2 on: March 29, 2020, 04:37:20 PM »
hi t.t. yes it is popular in Thailand - the history you posted is very interesting

i read Bocce is Italian. Petanque is French. The rules of the games are similar, but the equipment and the way the games are played is different.

Petanque balls (boules) are made of steel. Competition-quality boules are hollow; cheaper “leisure” boules may be filled with sand. Bocce balls are solid. Traditionally they were made of wood, but nowadays they are usually made of hard epoxy resin.

Petanque balls are smaller than bocce balls.— think of an orange vs. a grapefruit, or a baseball vs. a softball… a really fat softball. A typical petanque boule is 73mm (just under 3″) in diameter, while a standard bocce ball is 107mm (4.2″).

Petanque balls also weigh less than bocce balls. A typical petanque boule weighs around 680g (1.5 lb), while a standard bocce ball weighs 920g (2 lbs).
Bocce balls are usually painted or colored in at least two different colors (one color for each team). Petanque boules are plain steel with different sets being indicated by different patterns of grooves (French: stries). Each player knows his own set by its pattern of grooves.

Because a bocce ball is relatively large and heavy, bocce is basically a rolling game, that is: a game in which players roll the balls toward the target. Because a petanque boule is smaller and lighter, petanque is a throwing game. This difference leads to a difference in the way balls are thrown in the two games. In both games, the ball is thrown “under arm” as in softball, and not “over arm” as in baseball. In bocce, a player throws rolls the ball “under handed” with the palm up, so that the ball rolls off of the fingers onto the court. In petanque, a player throws the ball “back handed” (the back of the hand is up) and with a backward flick of the wrist as the ball leaves the hand. This allows a player (if he wishes) to throw a very high lob, something that you will never see in bocce.

Although bocce can be played on a lawn or grassy area, serious bocce is played on a dedicated court or lane with a long, smooth surface enclosed by wooden sideboards. Some bocce courts are true works of art and things of beauty.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

 



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