Author Topic: My Lai Massacre Anniversary  (Read 1248 times)

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sicho

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My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« on: March 16, 2012, 10:32:09 AM »
Today is the 44th anniversary of the torture, rape, mutilation and murder of hundreds of men, women, children and babies in My Lai and My Khe, Vietnam. Even if some haven't learned from this, we can at least make sure that the event isn't forgotten.

http://www.grumpyexpat.com/blog/2012/03 ... rsary.html
 

Offline thaiga

Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #1 on: March 16, 2012, 01:29:17 PM »
Even if some haven't learned from this,Some people dont know it even happened.Very sad.Here s a little bit more,makes interesting reading.
 Lawrence Colburn returned to My Lai on Saturday and found hope at the site of one of the most notorious chapters of the Vietnam War.

My Lai Massacre survivor Do Ba, 48, left, of Ho Chi Minh city, meets with former U.S. Army officer Lawrence Colburn, 58, of Canton, Ga., who rescued him during the massacre.

On the 40th anniversary of the massacre of up to 500 unarmed Vietnamese villagers, the former helicopter gunner was reunited with a young man he rescued from rampaging U.S. soldiers.

On March 16, 1968, Colburn found 8-year-old Do Ba clinging to his mother's corpse in a ditch full of blood and the bodies of more than 100 people who had been mowed down. Nearly all the victims were unarmed women, children and elderly.

"Today I see Do Ba with a wife and a baby," said Colburn, a member of a three-man Army helicopter crew that landed in the midst of the massacre and intervened to stop the killing. "He's transformed himself from being a broken, lonely man. Now he's complete. He's a perfect example of the human spirit, of the will to survive."

Colburn, 58, now runs a medical supplies business north of Atlanta. He, Ba and hundreds of others are gathering this weekend to remember the My Lai massacre, a grim milestone that shocked Americans and undermined support for the war, which ended in 1975 with the fall of Saigon to communist troops.

Buddhist monks in saffron robes led the mourners in prayer Saturday outside a museum that has been erected to remember the dead. An official memorial program will be held on Sunday.

Among those coming to pray was Ha Thi Quy, 83, a My Lai survivor who suffers from anger and depression four decades after the slaughter. Soldiers from the Army's Charlie Company shot her in the leg and killed her mother, her 16-year-old daughter and her 6-year-old son.

Her husband later died of injuries from the massacre and another son had to have an arm and a leg amputated after suffering gunshot wounds that day.

Quy only survived because she was shielded beneath a pile of dead bodies.

"The American government should stop waging wars like they waged in Vietnam," Quy said. "My children were innocent, but those American soldiers killed them."

Outrage over My Lai
Seymour Hersh, the journalist who exposed the massacre, said he sees parallels between My Lai and a more recent story that he has he reported on, the 2005 images of torture from the Abu Ghraib prison in Iraq. But he says the public furor unleashed by My Lai was far greater.

"It's stunning how much impact My Lai had and how little impact Abu Ghraib had," Hersh said by telephone from Washington. "We'll have to leave it to historians to figure out why."

On that morning 40 years ago, Colburn flew over My Lai on a reconnaissance mission with pilot Hugh Thompson and crew chief Glenn Andreotta. After several runs over the area, they realized that unarmed civilians were being slaughtered by U.S. troops on the ground.

The members of Charlie Company were a "search and destroy" mission, trying to track down elusive Vietcong guerrillas, whose tactics had depleted the company's ranks.

The company's soldiers began shooting in My Lai that day even though they hadn't come under attack. It quickly escalated into an orgy of killing.

Thompson landed the helicopter between the villagers and the marauding troops. While Colburn and Andreotta covered him, Thompson persuaded the members of Charlie Company to stop shooting.

The angry and frustrated troops had found themselves in a bewildering war where it was impossible to distinguish friend from foe, said Stanley Karnow, an American historian who wrote "Vietnam: A History."

Their actions shocked the American public, who had preferred to think of U.S. troops as heroes making the world safe for democracy, Karnow said.

Do Ba discovered
Colburn and Andreotta, who died later in the war, found Do Ba after the shooting stopped.

Ba's aunt raised him in My Lai. When he turned 18, he moved to the former Saigon, now known as Ho Chi Minh City, where he is married with a 14-month-old daughter and works at an electronics factory.

He and Colburn were first reunited at the 2001 dedication of a new school in the village. At that time, Ba was single, haunted by memories of My Lai and eager to start a family.

So much has changed since the day they first met, Ba said. The United States and Vietnam, former enemies, have become allies and developed a booming trade relationship.

"I'm glad the United States and Vietnam have become friends," Ba said. "But I still feel hatred for the soldiers who killed my mother, my brother and my sister."
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23651088/
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

sicho

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Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #2 on: March 16, 2012, 03:29:58 PM »
One of the murdering soldiers was interviewed in a documentary and a recent trailer on True Visions shows him, as a much older man, saying 'They were all Vietnam sympathisers'. If that's the only way he can cope with what he did, I almost feel sorry for him. He is one who didn't learn. Ironically, he belongs to a racial group in the US that complains about past ill-treatment that its members suffered.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #3 on: March 16, 2012, 04:55:08 PM »
VC dude doesn't look too happy does he.  Serious glare at a man who supposedly saved his life.
 

sicho

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Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #4 on: March 16, 2012, 05:00:46 PM »
VC dude doesn't look too happy does he.  Serious glare at a man who supposedly saved his life.

He was 48 at the time of that report so that would make him an 8 year old VC?
 

Online Taman Tun

Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #5 on: March 16, 2012, 09:06:44 PM »
A similar thing happened in Malaya in 1948 when the British army was busy saving the country from the commies.  This happened in the village of Batang Kali when 24 villagers were shot dead for no apparent reason.  Surviving relatives are still trying to get an explanation/compensation from the British government, so far without success.  The government says "it may take some time to research the files".   

The George Orwell book "Burmese Days"  gives a good feel of colonial life in the far east:- "lets go and give the natives a damned good bambooing".
TT
We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out. Churchill
 

sicho

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Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #6 on: March 16, 2012, 09:10:35 PM »
A great novel that shows how the British Empire worked - principally with gin, beatings and greedy local allies.
 

Offline Baby Farts

Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #7 on: March 17, 2012, 10:06:55 AM »
He was 48 at the time of that report so that would make him an 8 year old VC?

Sad isn't it....

Off topic a bit here.  How many people died building the railroads here when the Thais were allied with the Japanese?

The Burma Railway, also known as the Death Railway, the Thailand–Burma Railway and similar names, was a 415 kilometres (258 mi) railway between Bangkok, Thailand, and Rangoon, Burma (now Yangon, Myanmar), built by the Empire of Japan during World War II, to support its forces in the Burma campaign.

Forced labour was used in its construction. About 180,000 Asian labourers and 60,000 Allied prisoners of war (POWs) worked on the railway. Of these, around 90,000 Asian labourers (mainly romusha) and 16,000 Allied POWs died as a direct result of the project. The dead POWs included 6,318 British personnel, 2,815 Australians, 2,490 Dutch, about 356 Americans and a smaller number of Canadians and New Zealanders.


When is their anniversary?..  Hey at least they had a movie made after them...The Bridge over the river Kwai. What does this have to do with My Lai?  Absolutely nothing. 
 

Lebowski

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Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #8 on: March 17, 2012, 11:41:50 AM »
There is a plaque to them at the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery which estimates that approx 200,000 Thai/Burmese and other Asian laborers lost their lives but really the number is unknown as the Japs tricked people from all over the occupied areas into working on the railway.

As for My Lai, and the documentary was on History Channel last night, it appears that the Captain in charge of the company of marines was told by his commanding officer that they would definitely be facing an elusive NVA infantry battalion, they were told that civilians had been removed from the area/anyone remaining was VC and that it was time to 'front em up'.......which of course was all wrong and the NVA battalion was somewhere else in Vietnam. Grunts then lost control and started killing everyone as their animosity towards the Vietnamese was high, due to their 'orders' and high casualties in their companies in the previous days leading up to the incident.......I guess it was poor intelligence, command and an unchecked desire for payback from conscripts that had lost many friends.

   
 

Offline Penis Rick

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Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #9 on: March 17, 2012, 11:58:21 AM »
My thoughts. Check out today's American soldier on youtube. Absolutely nuts. Talk about hard core.
God gave us all a penis and a brain, but only enough blood to run one at a time.    ~ Robin Williams ~
 

Offline Penis Rick

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Re: My Lai Massacre Anniversary
« Reply #10 on: March 17, 2012, 12:07:26 PM »
There is a plaque to them at the Kanchanaburi War Cemetery which estimates that approx 200,000 Thai/Burmese and other Asian laborers lost their lives but really the number is unknown as the Japs tricked people from all over the occupied areas into working on the railway.

As for My Lai, and the documentary was on History Channel last night, it appears that the Captain in charge of the company of marines was told by his commanding officer that they would definitely be facing an elusive NVA infantry battalion, they were told that civilians had been removed from the area/anyone remaining was VC and that it was time to 'front em up'.......which of course was all wrong and the NVA battalion was somewhere else in Vietnam. Grunts then lost control and started killing everyone as their animosity towards the Vietnamese was high, due to their 'orders' and high casualties in their companies in the previous days leading up to the incident.......I guess it was poor intelligence, command and an unchecked desire for payback from conscripts that had lost many friends.

   


It's amazing too how many people were tricked by the Japs into committing suicide by jumping off of cliffs because they were told the American soldiers were going to rape, beat them, and torture them. There was a documentary about that on the history channel.

Here's some interesting reading.

http://hawaii.edu/powerkills/SOD.CHAP3.HTM [nofollow]

Click on the links at the bottom.
God gave us all a penis and a brain, but only enough blood to run one at a time.    ~ Robin Williams ~
 

 



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