Author Topic: Malaysian police teargas and water cannon crowds of protesters VIDEO  (Read 1309 times)

Offline thaiga

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KL protesters tear-gassed

Malaysian police on Saturday fired teargas and water cannon as crowds of protesters demanding electoral reforms surged into a central square in Kuala Lumpur, AFP correspondents said.

The protesters trampled through barbed wire barricades as they poured into the heavily guarded Independence Square, defying a ban on holding the rally at the venue in the heart of the congested capital.

The rally follows one that was crushed by police last July, when 1,600 people were arrested, and marks a major test for Prime Minister Najib Razak, who has sought to portray himself as a reformer ahead of widely expected polls.
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The protesters scampered and sought shelter at nearby buildings as police fired repeated rounds of teargas and water cannon.

An AFP correspondent said police descended on the venue to beat back the protesters and were in control of the square, while dozens of people were rounded up and held inside a police truck

"We want peace, we want justice for our country. We don't want to make any trouble," said housewife Carmen Yap, 42, who attended the protest with her husband and 10-year-old son.

The protesters confronted a lockdown in various parts of the city.

Large crowds of people, many in the yellow colours of the reform movement, gathered at various points around Kuala Lumpur, defying a ban on holding the rally at Independence Square.

But a heavy police presence hindered access to the city centre, including about 2,000 armed police deployed around the sealed-off square as a police helicopter buzzed low overhead.

Opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim said earlier that the demonstrators were intent on marching to the square.

National police spokesman Ramli Yoosuf said about 20,000 protesters had gathered at various locations around the square.

"Please obey the law and stay away from the square. It is a banned area," he said.

On Friday, it obtained a court order banning public gatherings there, provoking outrage from the opposition and rights groups who say the restrictions violate free speech and assembly.

Earlier Saturday, the crowds were vocal but peaceful, with a carnival atmosphere prevailing in some areas as people held balloons while others smiled as they snapped photographs of themselves in front of the razor wire.

"The government is being high handed in denying the people the changes we want. We demand free and fair elections," said Zainuddin Tahar, 54, a pensioner from central Malaysia, who wore a yellow shirt.

A sign stuck on the razor wire at one point said "Welcome to Tel Aviv."

Last July's rally brought tens of thousands to the streets but was met with police tear gas and water cannon.

A resulting backlash prompted Najib to set up a panel whose eventual report suggested a range of electoral changes, but main rally organisers Bersih 2.0 and the opposition say the recommendations fell far short.

They demand a complete overhaul of a nationwide voter roll they say is packed with phantom or duplicate voter registrations, and reform of an Election Commission viewed as biased in favour of the ruling coalition.

Speculation is rife that Najib could call polls as early as June, and Bersih is demanding elections be postponed until full reforms are implemented.

"People want a clean electoral roll. The government is refusing to do that. Because of this they are getting angry and are out here today," Anwar said.

The rally poses a dilemma for Najib, who since last year's crackdown has sought to portray himself as a reformer, launching a campaign to repeal authoritarian laws in a bid to create what he called "the greatest democracy".

But while giving the go-ahead for Saturday's rally, his government ruled out the city centre, instead offering several stadium venues. Bersih has declined, saying demonstrating at the square was a basic right.

Critics have said the rally restrictions and alleged harassment of activists in recent days have exposed Najib's reform promises as insincere.

"Today is a major test case for basic freedoms in Malaysia, starting with the right to peacefully march and assemble," Human Rights Watch said in a statement.

Najib's ruling coalition has governed Malaysia for more than five decades but made a dismal showing against the opposition in 2008, and he face pressure to improve on that.
SOURCE

'Police violence' at Malaysia reform rally
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Online Taman Tun

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As a KL resident I can sympathise with the Police. Any number of different groups would love to protest in Dataran Merdeka every weekend.  Homosexualists, communists, global warmers, you name it.  The only problem is that Dataran Merdeka is a historic area in the centre of KL. Any demos there paralyses the streets for many km around.  The government have offered a very reasonable compromise and allowed these groups to hold their demos in sports stadiums nearby thereby allowing the local residents to get on with their normal lives.
If the old only could, if the young only knew.

sicho

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The whole point of a demo. is that it disrupts other people's lives. There's no point in having a demo. if no-one sees it. Has the government tried listening to their grievances?

Offline thaiga

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Re: 12 yr old Dutch boy kidnapped in Malaysia VIDEO
« Reply #3 on: April 28, 2012, 11:09:52 PM »
A 12-year-old Dutch boy has been kidnapped in Kuala Lumpur, the capital of Malaysia. The boy was dragged into a dark-coloured car with false number plates by three men before the eyes of his classmates. A spokesperson from the Dutch municipality of Son en Breugel has called it a “worrying situation”.

The boy Nayati Moodliar is the son of a couple from South Africa and therefore also holds South African nationality. The family lived in Son en Breugel for almost 11 years, but had moved to Malaysia for the father’s job. The boy attended an international school.

The kidnapping was filmed. Pictures of the boy have been distributed and a huge search is underway. His father made an emotional appeal for his safe return. “It is our only son. He is a good boy. We want him back. We don’t want any trouble. It is not too late to let him go. Let him come back.'' So far no ransom has been demanded.

One of his former Dutch teachers said, “He is a really nice and enthusiastic boy with a fanclub among the girls.''

The family is receiving assistance from the Dutch embassy in Malaysia. The Foreign Ministry said it did not want to speculate what is behind the kidnapping.
Nayati Shamelin Moodliar 12 years old Kid missing Help to Find Him 27 April 2012 Part 2

SOURCE
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Online Taman Tun

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I agree that people should be allowed to demonstrate but the problem is that a large number of different groups want to stage demos in Dataran Merdeka at the weekends.  It is not right that minority groupings be allowed to disrupt the life of the city week after week.  There are alternate venues for these people to go to.  As for the kidnapping, that happened quite close to Taman Tun and we have a friend who has a son at that school.  A number of wealthy Malaysian families send their children there.  I fear the kidnappers may have kidnapped the wrong person as the family involved say they are not particularly wealthy. 

Saf, I am back in Korat so will try and get down to see you in the next few days.
If the old only could, if the young only knew.

sicho

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I look forward to meeting you. Will PM my 'phone number.

 



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