Author Topic: living alongside coronavirus  (Read 2277 times)

Offline thaiga

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People's livelihoods seriously affected by Covid-19: Poll

The spread of novel coronavirus has lowered the Thai people's incomes and savings while inflating their debts, according to a survey conducted by the Suan Dusit Rajabhat University, or Suan Dusit Poll.

The poll was conducted online between May 12-15 on 1,125 people throughout the country.

Asked to choose between multiple choice answers, 25.16% of the respondents said the virus had cut down their regular income; 35.38% said it had reduced side income; 27.91% said it had lowered their savings; and 25.07% said it had caused them to become more indebted.

Asked what they had spent more on as a result of the Covid-19 spread, 68.53% cited water and power bills; 44.89% mobile phone and Internet bills; 40.27% food and drinks; 20.18% medicine, medical treatment and health care; and 14.22% donations and merit-making.

Asked what they had paid less for, 60.62% mentioned transportation and fuel costs; 42.31% clothing; 41.51% travel and leisure; 38.67% the lottery and sweepstakes; and 34.31% ornaments and perfume.

bangkokpost.com
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Offline thaiga

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London 'pub-on-wheels' pulls pints on people's doorsteps  channelnewsasia.com 

                       

Britain's pubs may be shut, but one east London brewer has found a novel way to keep the beer flowing: By packing his kegs into a van and pulling pints on people's doorsteps.

Driving a white van with the slogan "tactical beer response unit" on the side, Peter Brown, the director of Forest Road Brewing Co., spends his day fulfilling delivery orders.

But rather than delivering boxes of cans or bottles, Brown fills pint glasses for his customers out of taps on the side of the van.

"It doesn't fit as much beer as our bar would do on a normal Friday or Saturday, but what we do get is the pure joy on the customers' faces when they see a cold glass of beer for the first time in six weeks," he told Reuters.

"The look on their faces is just irreplaceable."   

Britain's pubs and bars have been closed for nearly two months. Government first advised people avoid them, then demanded they close and on Mar 23 imposed a countrywide lockdown in response to the spread of the coronavirus.

Under the restrictions of lockdown, food and drink suppliers can still offer delivery services.

Even as many firms turn to delivering cans, last month the Society of Independent Brewers said many breweries were facing closure as beer sales had fallen 82 per cent.

Brown said he had seen strong demand for his pint deliveries: He was booked up until the end of May, and was investigating acquiring another van to serve different postcodes.

Customers are big fans of the service, and one suggested that Brown, who already delivers with a bandana over his mouth, should add to his outfit to reflect his superman efforts.

"The man's a hero, simple as that. Not all heroes wear capes, but this guy should," said Nick Bateson, a customer who is a festival organiser from London.

"Amazing beer, quick delivery, love it."

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline thaiga

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Meet Rural Health Volunteers, the Unsung Heroes on Virus Frontline


As soon as a woman in her rural community registered a high fever, Auntie Arun alerted the local hospital doctors, who soon arrived in at least three cars, prepped to transport a COVID-19 patient.

Fortunately enough, the woman did not have the coronavirus, and the Moo 11 village in Nong Khai province remains free of the pandemic. Auntie Arun, or Arunrat Rukthin, 60, said she plans to keep it that way.

Arun is not a doctor, but a member of the nationwide Village Health Volunteers, known by their Thai acronym Aor Sor Mor – the unsung heroes on the frontline to monitor and protect residents from the coronavirus. They are also credited as one of the reasons why COVID-19 figures in Thailand stayed relatively low.

“We’re very ready, every village, subdistrict, district. We know everyone, who’s living where. We knock on doors, ask where people travelled to, and give our numbers to them so they can call. We distribute pamphlets about COVID and washing hands, and stick them up on doors,” Auntie Arun said.

The volunteers act as middlemen between rural residents and health officials, conveying medical facts and doctors’ orders to neighbors they’ve known all their lives. Their job is to knock on doors to check temperatures, as well as educating locals about hand-washing and social distancing.

“Some people are scared at home, so they call us, and ask us to come check their temperatures,” Auntie Arun said.

During a recent news conference, government coronavirus taskforce spokesman Taweesin Visanuyothin also thanked the volunteers for quickly reporting a new case of infection in Chiang Mai province.

“It is the ability of Aor Sor Mor volunteers in the area who took the man to test for COVID-19,” Taweesain said on Thursday. “This shows how important local personnel are.”

What is Aor Sor Mor?

It is possible to watch some Thai news channels all day and miss out on the roles of these aunties and uncles taking up their civic duties in the countryside, since much of the mainstream coverage is occupied by doctors, experts, and other Bangkok-based officials.

But the volunteers have not entirely gone unnoticed. Back in April, the World Health Organization gave a shout out in a Tweet and congratulated them for their work.

 

The Village Health Volunteer network was set up in 1977, after the Thai Ministry of Health partnered with the Japanese government to develop a primary health care system in all regions nationwide.

The concept was also an embodiment of Thailand’s pragmatism. In a column, former deputy PM Wiraphong Ramangkun said the Aor Sor Mor was inspired by the Thai Communist Party’s local version of the rural “barefoot doctors” in mainland China – despite the widespread anti-Communism sentiment in Cold War Thailand.

Each of the 1.04 million Aor Sor Mor volunteers is expected to provide basic health information to local residents, and coordinate doctors’ visits to 15 to 25 households.

The project’s foot soldiers are ordinary senior citizens in rural communities, like Pompaeng Phaholtap, 60, a volunteer in charge of 15 households in her village in Nong Bua Lamphu province. She has been working for the program since 2001.

Since the pandemic broke out in January, Pompaeng has been delivering prescription medicines from doctors to the elderly in her neighborhood so both parties can practice social distancing.

“Some people call us to visit their house because they want us to give them more information about COVID, even if they already heard it before. They want to hear us say it,” Pompaeng said. “We’re the ones taking care of everyone, from newborns to the elderly.”



The People’s War

While they are not trained to operate like professional doctors and nurses, the volunteers play a crucial support role in the country’s public healthcare system by doing their best to prevent people from falling sick in the first place.

“We are only doctor’s helpers,” volunteer Phannarath Phanpong said. “We don’t do things beyond our reach. We keep people away from diseases and help reduce the workload of hospitals.”

lots more here on these heroes of our time  khaosodenglish.com

                                                           
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline thaiga

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Making ends meet  nationthailand.com
A jewellery shop owner has become a barber on a street as the Covid-19 crisis forced him to seek a new way to have some income.
Burin Ploywong, 62, owned a silver jewellery shop in a shopping mall which was closed due to the lockdown measure. He then decided to grab a hair clipper and ran a barber shop on the corner of a street in Suksawat 30 alley from 10am to 6pm. He gets 10 to 20 customers a day who ate drawn up his Bt50 per haircut price and it is not crowded like other salons.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline thaiga

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Re: living alongside coronavirus - The long wait for handouts
« Reply #64 on: Yesterday at 11:32:33 AM »
The long wait for handouts



Some 1,000 locals in Chonburi province were queuing up from as early as 1am on Thursday (May 28) at Soi Thappaya 5 in Banglamung district to receive handouts of food and consumer products provided by the Norwegian Seamen's Church Pattaya.

The church distributes 2,000 packs of the handouts at 9am every Thursday to people who have been affected by the Covid-19 situation in Pattaya, the famous tourist city that has been shut down to avoid the outbreak.

At around 3am, police officers from Muang Pattaya Station came to disperse the crowd as 11pm to 4am are curfew hours imposed by the government. However, a news source said that the crowd dispersed only temporarily and queued up again once the police had gone.

One of the villagers, whose house is located near the church, expressed concern that the gathering of the crowd could increase the risk of Covid-19 spreading as social distancing measures are not maintained in the queue, which is almost half a kilometre long. “Furthermore, their loud chattering is really annoying and kept us up until dawn,” they added.



nationthailand.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline thaiga

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Help on the way for monks doing without alms



Prime Minister’s Office Minister Thewan Liptapanlop said on Thursday (May 28) that Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha has assigned him the job of helping Buddhist temples nationwide that have been affected by the Covid-19 crisis and lockdown measures.

“The National Office of Buddhism has submitted a list of about 40,000 temples across the country that have been affected by the outbreak and lockdown measures, which are preventing people from visiting temples to make donations and give alms,” he said. “Approximately 200,000 monks have been hit by a shortage of food and other necessities.”

Thewan said he will send the list across to the Finance Ministry to come up with an estimate of how much will be needed to solve the problem.

“We are also looking at the measure that was used in 2009, when Buddhist monks in the three southern border provinces [Yala, Narathiwat and Pattani] had to go without morning alms due to security reasons,” he said. “Back then the Cabinet approved a Bt100 per day handout to each monk so they could buy food and other necessities.

“If the plan is approved, we will possibly require Bt400 million to Bt500 million per month to help all affected temples. Money will be paid to each temple, which can then work out how it can be disbursed among the monks.”

nationthailand.com
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

 



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