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Topic Summary

Posted by: Taman Tun
« on: October 09, 2020, 07:03:41 AM »

This interesting article from the Times.  Unfortunately, the article is silent about Elton John fans.


Matthew Moore, Media Correspondent

The blues may be the sound of hard times and lost love but those drawn to the genre’s melancholy tunes are more emotionally stable than most, a new study suggests.

Researchers found that musical taste can be a highly accurate indicator of personality type and that our preferences, from jazz to death metal, offer a window to the soul.

The findings are based on an analysis of 17.6 million songs streamed by 5,800 Spotify users over a three month period.

Some of the insights are unexpected — blues fans are more likely to be emotionally stable — but others are arguably less surprising.

A penchant for punk is correlated with disagreeableness and a lack of conscientiousness, a finding the Sex Pistols would surely have worn as a badge of honour.

If you find Aretha Franklin in your new partner’s record collection, stick with them: soul lovers tend to be agreeable.

Fans of Mumford & Sons and Laura Marling can take comfort from knowing that folk has the strongest correlation with openness. Country music devotees and R&B aficionados are most likely to be extroverts, while darker genres like death metal, gothic and emo are correlated with introverted natures.

Volunteers for the study were asked to complete the Big Five Inventory, a common personality test that rates people according to openness, conscientiousness, extroversion, agreeableness and emotional stability.

Previous academic studies have suggested that personality plays little role in musical taste. “Our results using big data and advanced machine learning techniques show the opposite,” the Spotify team concluded. “There is a great deal of information about personality that is communicated through musical preferences.”

The paper, published in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science, concludes that personality types can be predicted by musical selections and listening habits “with moderate to high accuracy”.

This is particularly true for two of the traits, emotional stability and conscientiousness. The researchers, led by Ian Anderson, Spotify’s senior research scientist, said it was not clear whether people seek out music that reflects their personality, or whether our personalities are shaped by the songs we hear. They suspect both factors are at play.

The findings could help Spotify create more targeted adverts. This week the audio streaming service was granted a patent for technology that would allow it to speak to users in different voices based on its assessment of their personalities.


Thailand