Author Topic: Hobby Farm in the sticks  (Read 6600 times)

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Offline jonesy2648

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Hobby Farm in the sticks
« on: May 10, 2013, 04:03:13 PM »
Hello esteemed members,
I am enquiring about hobby farms, the do,s and don't,s, the legalities etc about starting one to maybe generate a small to medium income while living in Thailand.
My Thai wife has a block of land (7 Rai ) at Ban Tako which is just south of Ban Luam approximately 100k/m north of Korat.
The land is cleared vacant land ex rice farm which has a river flowing across the front of it and the cha-note for the land is in my wife's name.

The entrance to the land is by road approximately 1.5k/m off the main drag through Ban Tako which we have been told is soon to be a 4 lane free-way from Kon Kaen to korat

We were thinking maybe planting mango trees, sugar cane, or whatever to get a return on what we can produce from the land and we are wondering if anyone has tried this before, can you legally do this or any negatives or positives? straight away we have realized that security may be a problem because it is off the main drag.

Any Information or Advice would be most appreciated

Regards, from Jonesy :salute
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2013, 04:32:58 PM »
Hi Jonesy.
Legalities - officially, I don't think you are even allowed a hobby that includes working for gain, without a permit. But.
A friend in Kanchanaburi grows a spice plant, 4 to a concrete post, (he has 100's).
Its a plant he calls 'debris' but my Missis doesn't know what it is. Sells at a good price apparently. I'll see if I can find out more.
Good luck with the project.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #2 on: May 10, 2013, 05:16:43 PM »
Quote
Prohibited Occupations in Thailand


Foreigners are allowed to work in Thailand if you have a valid visa, a work permit and are employed with an occupation that does not violate the Alien Employment Act. If you are a foreigner and you intend to work in Thailand, you are subject to the Alien Employment Act, which requires you to have a work permit to be issued by the Department of Employment, Ministry of Labour, or unless it falls within an exception of the said Act.

According to Thai law, foreigners can work in the country but factors such as the national security, as well as the need of alien labour for the development of the country are being considered. Thai nationals are still to be given priority.

Listed below are the businesses that are prohibited to foreigners:

The Alien Business Law (N.E.C. Announcement 281). Business activities falling in categories A & B are generally closed to foreigners. Under category C you must obtain a permit prior to commencing business. Businesses outside these categories are exempt. The Ministry of Commerce will also help applications of non trading offices.

Category A:

1. Agriculture: rice farming; salt farming. 2. Commercial Business: Internal trade in local agriculture products, Land trade. 3. Service business: Accounting, farming animals, architecture, advertising, brokerage, auctioning, Barber, hair dressing & beautician. Building industry.

Category B.

1. Agriculture Business: orchids, cultivation, animal husbandry including silk worm raising, timbering, fishing. 2. Industrial & Handicraft: Rice milling, Flour making, sugar, alcohol & non alcohol drinks, Ice cream, Pharmaceutical manufacturing, cold storage, timber, gold, silver and inlaid stone, wood carving, lacquer-ware, match making, cement etc, Dynamiting rocks, Manufacturing garments & shoes, Printing, newspaper publishing, silk weaving or silk printing, manufacture of finished products in silk. 3. Commercial: all retailing not in category C. Or trading not in Category C, selling food an drinks, trading of antiques & fine arts. 4. Service Industry: Tour agency, Hotels except Hotel management, photography, laundering, dress making and service jobs. 5. Land, water & i.e.  Transport.

Category C.

You are allowed to do the following: Exporting, all wholesale trades not in A & B. retiling machinery, equipment & tools, selling food, beverages that promote tourism. Industrial & handicraft Business: manufacturing animal feeds, vegetable oil extraction, textile manufacturing, dyeing, fabric printing, glass ware manufacturing, making plates and bowls, stationary & printing paper, rock salt mining, mining.

In the category, you have to apply for a work permit in order to do business legally in Thailand.


Source: http://www.thaiworkpermit.com/prohibited-occupations-in-thailand.html
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #3 on: May 10, 2013, 05:46:10 PM »
Thanks for replies Roger and Johnnie F,

If I am correct I could get a work permit if my wife registered a business name  under herself for the hobby farm (if that is required) and then she would be able to organise me a work permit as her employee...................please correct me if I am wrong

Regards,
Jonesy
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #4 on: May 10, 2013, 05:50:38 PM »
I don't think you could get a work permit working on a farm! But who could keep you from passing your farming knowledge to your wife, showing her how to do?
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2013, 05:59:14 PM »
Yes you are right Johnnie, My wife's family who live not far from the land are rice and pig farmers and are willing to help her, myself I do not know much about farming
the whole idea came about when I was discussing with her that unless she uses the land for at least something then it is just a waste just sitting there doing nothing
she is the one who came up with the idea of a hobby farm but she told me you do not get much for rice unless you have a big harvest, you don't get much return on sugar cane either unless you have a huge amount of it.........so growing fruit or dig a huge pond for prawns or fish you would probably make a little bit of cash........or her other idea was to lease the land to some other farmer
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #6 on: May 10, 2013, 06:12:09 PM »
........or her other idea was to lease the land to some other farmer

And that's her best idea! Having a garden with some trees and other plants will probably be the most you can do yourself. Otherwise you got to rely on workers, who usually just don't have time when their own fields need to be taken care of as well. Letting others use your land for farming gives you a few sacks of rice etc. and the position to ask for help from others, as you helped them, too...
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #7 on: May 10, 2013, 06:14:02 PM »
Hobby maybe, not trying to dampen your outlook on things, but i wouldn't hold your breath
about making money here.

although this chap in the video seems too.



The Farang Yum Woonsen Vendor Of Bangkok


                                     Unfortunately, I think this publicity will be their undoing.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #8 on: May 10, 2013, 06:51:30 PM »
Yes leasing the land to someone else might be the best option, personally myself I would not be interested in doing anything as I will be retired before our next trip there.
I would help her any way I could without being involved physically in it and would have to stay out of sight because of the Thai Law
she will need to rethink her options but thanks for the advice anyway......much appreciated
Cheers, Jonesy
 

sicho

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #9 on: May 10, 2013, 10:23:20 PM »
The availability of water and the land title are a good start. If you don't intend to work on the land yourself, you will have no problems with the law.

Rice is an non-starter. Avoid fashionable crops such as cassava. When the price goes up, more people grow the next crop and the price falls.

Go for staples such as lime and mango but learn how to get a good crop. Corn is another one to consider. Also, think about bamboo. The shoots sell for food and the  stems can also be sold.

 

Offline Roger

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #10 on: May 11, 2013, 07:59:03 AM »
Saf. Any idea what is grown - 4 plants around a concrete pole - then dried and ground up. A spice. My Pal calls it debris ??? Roger
 

sicho

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #11 on: May 11, 2013, 08:39:23 AM »
Roger,

The only plant I know that's grown on a concrete post is dragon fruit. Do you have a pic?
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks (Hydroponics
« Reply #12 on: May 11, 2013, 09:14:08 AM »
Hi Roger and Saf,
another option would be (Hydroponics) but on a bigger scale, please refer to links:
Building a hydroponic system part 1&2
How To Build A Hydroponic System Part 1 of 2 [nofollow]
http://www.homehydrosystems.com/system_plans/free_plans.html [nofollow]
Just a thought, or try this one: Hydroponic Vegetable Production - Growing Kentucky, August 2009 [nofollow]

And another if you like fish with your vegetables: Project FEEDS - Hydroponic Fish Farm [nofollow]
Food for thought,
Jonesy
 

sicho

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #13 on: May 11, 2013, 09:29:16 AM »
Hydroponics is becoming popular. There are two farms close to our home.

As I'm sure you know, there's an initial capital outlay involved in addition to the seeds or seedlings and you will need to buy feed and insecticide. It's more labour intensive than soil grown crops. At least you won't have a problem with weeds!

European style lettuce types do well under shade and sell for THB100 per kilo. One of the farms near to us, short of capacity a while ago, offered seedlings at THB50 per kilo and bought back the crop. They also provided help to build the structure. That didn't seem to be very profitable. It would be better to buy seeds and sell surplus crops with roots intact at markets and to restaurants.

If you have enough land, you might consider growing a range of fruit trees. It takes a few years for them to begin to fruit but care is easy.
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #14 on: May 11, 2013, 09:39:47 AM »
Hi Saf,
I have seen mature Mango trees in pots with green fruit already on them  there is a stall along side of a petrol station on the way into Korat about 40k/m out of town on the main road from Bangkok price range is 1000 to 2000 Baht each, as you may know small mango trees take about three years to produce fruit.

My wife has allowed $10,000 au capital if she wants to proceed, she would need things such as pumps, irrigation equipment etc. and anything else to kick it off
 

sicho

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #15 on: May 11, 2013, 10:51:18 AM »
The place to shop for plants is Kok Kruat just off the 2 road after the TOT building.
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #16 on: May 11, 2013, 11:02:01 AM »
Hi Saf, Thanks for that info, is the place you are referring to for the plants is a nursery on a side street left of Mittraphap road Kok Kruat just before Neo Hardware?
 

sicho

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #17 on: May 11, 2013, 12:19:40 PM »
I don't know Neo but I think we are talking about the right location.

If you take the left turn the plants are on both sides of the road.
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #18 on: May 11, 2013, 02:18:22 PM »
Thanks Saf, yes that is the correct place, we bought our hedge plants, palm trees and garden plants from them and they arranged and installed roll on lawn for us late last year
friendly people and their prices were more than reasonable :)

Neo hardware is just up from them about a k/m , service there is very poor as most of the staff were like zombies, better service for hardware at Homepro on the bypass road...................they sell everything but plants
 

sicho

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #19 on: May 11, 2013, 03:12:30 PM »
If the staff are worse than at Homepro, the must be very bad!
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #20 on: May 11, 2013, 06:00:34 PM »
believe me, Neo staff are very bad compared with home-pro although I think home-pro staff are ex Neo..................ask for a hammer in Thai............they show you a shovel :-[ and home-pro,s returns policy is crap! I had a problem with a brand new water pump after 2 days, took it back and they did not want to know about it until my Thai brother in law suggested that they can stick it where the sun don't shine! :cussing :cussing
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #21 on: May 12, 2013, 02:45:15 PM »
Hey Jonesy.
I think the staff at Homepro on the KK road, are pretty good - a lot of them around and if you ask, they'll get you an English speaker.
I blew an engine on an 'Asgatec' lawn mower after 1 year and 3 days. Took it back more in hope than faith and they pointed out the guarantee was 2 years. I had to wait 4 weeks but it came back with a new engine. Always use them for Paints. Other things too.
Pumps - I dislike Do-Home but they have a good range of pumps at very good prices.
Saf re Dragon fruit - don't think it's that. It's dried and ground as a herb. No photo sorry, but I'll try to find out later.
ATB
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #22 on: May 13, 2013, 04:09:52 PM »
Thanks Roger,
Where would I find Do-Home? I have been told that the continuing problem I am having with my pump is that ants are getting into the electrics?
problem is I don't see any evidence of ants :-[
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #23 on: May 13, 2013, 05:04:10 PM »
 
Do home- take korat to buiram rd./chok chai rd. as if you was going to dan kwian immigration its on the left well before. Cant miss it. What pump do you have and whats the problem.

DO HOME - Korat Branch (Home Finishing & Costruction Material Mall)
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Offline Roger

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #24 on: May 13, 2013, 07:07:05 PM »
Hi Jonesy.
I guess you're coming to into Korat from the KK road ? Turn left/east towards Chok Chai and it's a few KM past the new Tesco on the eastern outskirts of Korat.
Ants in the electrics - more likely red herrings but anything is possible of course. Rats might bite the exposed electrics but ants I think would get a buzz, or be munched up !
As Thaiga said - what does the pump have to do ? What pump do you have ?
Good luck.
Roger
 

Offline jonesy2648

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #25 on: May 14, 2013, 08:12:57 PM »
Hi Roger and Thaiga, thanks for the info on how to find (Do Home)
The pump I have is a Hitachi Model WT-350-GX 350watt high volume water pump that is used solely to run my lawn sprinkler reticulation/irrigation system that I installed last December.
It is a secondary pump connected independently from the existing smaller pump to a 5000 litre water tank that increases the water pressure to the house.
both pumps are connected to the water tank which is fed from the main water supply. the tank shut off is controlled by a floatation valve inside the tank at the top.
this valve shuts off the feed from the mains when it reaches the float valve set level.

both pumps remain powered on and the house supply is activated when an internal tap is turned on, toilet flushed or if someone is using the shower in either each of the three bathrooms.

The second pump remains powered on at all times and is activated when one of the three irrigation solenoid valves is activated from a digital programmed irrigation controller which is set to water the whole garden and front and side lawns at 6am every morning.

Both pumps are connected to the water tank independently, one to the house - the other to the reticulation/irrigation system

The reason that I installed the secondary pump (the Hitachi problem pump) is that the water volume and pressure required to run three solenoid watering stations that supply water to 12 popup sprinklers and also a drip feed system to the garden was not adequate in pressure.

also if I tried to do away with the smaller pump and just have the larger Hitachi the pressure would have blown all of the internal plumbing fittings eventually while the irrigation system was not being used. This I was already aware of and also reminded to me from the guy at Home-pro where I purchased it from.

The system was working fine with no problem at all until one week after we left to come back to Australia.
My brother-in-law has been to the house on one occasion and found ants within the cover of the large pump, he got rid of the ants, put ant powder around the pump an inside the cover and the pump worked again, he checked for a loose earth connection and checked the wiring under my instructions and found no problem.

He also checked and tested the electronic digital controller and found no problem with that- it could not have been caused by a power black out because the digital controller has a backup battery. all three solenoids were also checked and found to have no faults.
the problem has to be in the pump?

I have had several years experience in reticulation/irrigation and have installed quite a few domestic systems and never had any problems as I know what I'm doing.

I am due back in July and will try and fix the problem, I was trying to locate a handyman or plumber to go and check it out for me but had no luck in finding anyone interested.

Although some of the hardware stores sell irrigation equipment, pipe sprinklers etc., it seems that no-one sells the controllers which I bought with me from Australia

Payment is not a problem as I can easily transfer money to an individual or alternatively to the estate site office to pay the person who can fix the problem
but if I cant find anyone then it will have to wait until I return in July

Sorry for the long drawn out reply (Story).........................cheers, Jonesy :-[
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Hobby Farm in the sticks
« Reply #26 on: May 15, 2013, 04:56:30 PM »
Jonesy you know a lot more about pumps than I do. You say the pump worked again. Hope it keeps going !
Don't see how the Ants would have stopped  it though - they'd just be electrocuted surely. Maybe some of your Brother in Law's fiddling around sorted it. Good Luck
 

 



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