Author Topic: How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life  (Read 869 times)

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Offline thaiga

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How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life
« on: May 08, 2016, 01:57:16 PM »
An interesting article from theoffbeatdad gives the insight of one expats view on, the good and the bad side of living in Thailand, where he tries to put together an accurate picture of what Westerners can expect as expats in the Land of Smiles.

How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life

I have more family time

In America I worked 60+ hours a week. I was forced to work weekends and holidays. There were times when I’d get home close to midnight, only to wake up at 6am and start the process all over again. This took place for weeks on end during the winter months. But in Thailand the work I do outside of home takes 2–4 hours a day. I also work from home, which starts at 4am and ends when the family gets up. The rest of the time I’m home or exploring Bangkok’s parks with my family.

I spend less on housing

For $315 a month we have one hell of a spot. It’s a two-bedroom, two-bathroom condo close to the BTS and highways. A giant park stretches through the middle of the complex. In the middle of the park is a swimming pool, lake, playgrounds, running path, and gym.

I work less

I work an average of 5–7 hours a day in Thailand. That includes travel time to and from home. My work hours aren’t a reflection of a great pay rate though. I work enough to pay the bills and afford fun for the family. Because I spent 15 years working 60+ hour work weeks, I can’t see myself going back to that schedule. Can I work such few hours for the rest of my life? Not likely. But right now I’m taking pleasure in bonding with my daughters.

Food is easy to get

Food is all over the place in Thailand. If I get hungry at any time of the day or night, I can walk out to the street and find a selection of foods. Just outside our complex is a row of restaurants, fresh fruit and vegetable stands, Japanese food, and on certain days of the week, a Mexican food truck and hamburger truck. There’s also a 7–11, Topps Daily, S&P, and Starbucks. Our area is a popular stop for Thai and Western foodies.

The climate helps me breathe

When I was 11 years old I broke my nose in a car crash. The doctor who fixed my nose left me with one deviated septum. So I can only breath through my right nostril. During the cold months back home, my sinuses would dry out and swell up, blocking my only good breathing passage. And when I went from cold to hot places, my nose would bleed. For the 2 years I’ve been in Thailand, I’ve only had my sinuses swell up once, and I’ve never had a bloody nose. Thailand’s hot and humid climate is perfect for me.

I’ve become more relaxed

Thailand and the Thai people have a way of making you feel more relaxed. Things aren’t as serious as they are back home (which is both good and bad). In America, little things bothered me. Like traffic. It drove me crazy. In Bangkok, traffic is so normal that I’ve learned to roll with it. Also, since I’m still trying to figure out how to navigate through life in Thailand, and since a lot of things still don’t make sense to me, I’ve learned to let go and live without expectations.

How moving to Thailand worsened the quality of my life

Driving has become a focused task

In America, I liked going out for weekend drives. It was a time to get away, listen to music, lower the windows and enjoy the weather. I can’t do that in Thailand. Year after year, Thailand’s roads are ranked as one of the top 5 deadliest roads in the world.[1] I drive everyday for work or travel. And every time I get behind the wheel I have to be alert.

I’m always on guard with my kids

I’ve never raised kids in America. We left when our first daughter was 6 months old. So this might apply to every other country in the world. Or it might not. Since Thailand is community-based people love giving things to your kids. Every day parents want to give our daughter junk food. It’s a constant struggle and goes against what we’re trying to teach our daughter about eating habits. We know they mean well. But as parents we’re not okay with this. Don’t get me wrong. We give our daughter ice cream and other sweets. But in moderation. It’s not something that replaces her dinner. We also don’t want our daughter taking everything people offer her. We live in Thailand but we’re still American in many ways.

Quality food is hard to find and more expensive

Although food is available all over the place, it’s not always healthy. Most street food has been laying around on the table all day, laced with falling particles of smog from bus and truck exhaust. At restaurants, sugar and MSG are regular ingredients. Quality foods like organic vegetables and meats are available at the supermarkets, but they’re expensive.

Conclusion

Right now the pros outweigh the cons. We still enjoy living in Thailand. But having daughters is causing us to rethink our plans. We’re not sure how long we’ll stay here, or where we’ll go next.

Thanks to theoffbeatdad.com Whatever you decide good luck.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.

Offline Baby Farts

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Re: How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2016, 12:56:37 PM »
Give it a few years more and a lot of the pros will turn to cons, along with some new ones.  One thing I totally disagree with is the weather issue.  I absolutely hate hot weather....blazing hot like it is in Thailand.  I don't understand why some people tell me they moved to Thailand because of the weather, unless you come from a place where it snows nine months out of the year, but this place is ridiculously hot. 

Offline Aussie

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Re: How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2016, 05:15:19 PM »
I'm with you Baby Farts.  It is just too bloody hot in Thailand at the moment to enjoy.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes

Offline Aussie

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Re: How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life
« Reply #3 on: May 09, 2016, 05:28:01 PM »
Your articles are interesting to read.
Regards
Before you criticise someone, you should walk a mile in their shoes. That way, when you criticise them, you’re a mile away and have their shoes

Offline sowhat

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Re: How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life
« Reply #4 on: May 09, 2016, 06:59:34 PM »
yes very interesting / that's where the THANK YOU button comes in handy :cheers

Offline Baby Farts

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Re: How Moving to Thailand Changed the Quality of My Life
« Reply #5 on: May 10, 2016, 09:31:15 AM »
Why thank you very much.  After being here for fifteen years now, a lot of interesting things happen in the LOS.  ;D

One interesting phenomena that I've seen lately involves farangs who turn into Thais (think they are)...or Thainess.  Nothing wrong with that to a point, but there are some that have actually totally abandoned their own culture (for whatever reasons) and think they are now 100% Thai (Many who can't even speak Thai). Remember the last coupe and that farang who wanted to participate in the riots and burn down some building in Bangkok?  Then there are the ones who start to behave like Thais.....ride motorbikes without helmets, carrying a baby with no helmet, etc, yet they are the same ones who complain about Thais not wearing helmets.  It's an interesting concept. 

I have to admit, I have behaved like a Thai, but it was only to be sarcastic and prove a point.  One day I had to take my wife and one of her friends and the friend's husband to look at some land.  As usual, Mittaphrap road was filled with speeding cars, trucks, cutting in and out etc.  So I started doing the same thing. My wife and her friend immediately freaked out and asked me why I'm driving so crazy.   

My wife & Friend: "Why you drive like that? "

Me: "I'm copying the way Thai people drive.  This is Thai style driving.  Fun yes? Weeee. If we get in an accident and we all die, our relatives can blame it all on bad luck.  However, if we live, I'm going to blame it on the Thai person, even though it's my fault and I'm going to say I don't have any insurance.  That way his insurance can pay to get my car fixed, and if he doesn't have insurance, we can borrow money from one of those Thai loan sharks or uncle Somchai." 

My wife: "That's not Thai style."

Me: "Sure it is.  Just look around. I can play my dash cam on your phone if you want to see."

My wife: " OOoooooooooWEE!"  <---You guys all know this sound, right? Maybe it's Oooouie!

I probably shouldn't have given them the scare, but I'm pretty sure I got my point across.  My friend and her friend were baffled.  You can always tell when you win a debate with a Thai without a rebuttal.  I call it the "Thai twitch."  Here's how it works. Once they know you've backed them into a corner and they know you're right and they have no ammo left, they scratch their head.  You know, like this:

   


 



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