Author Topic: Expats tales of woe  (Read 1831 times)

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Offline thaiga

Expats tales of woe
« on: November 03, 2015, 03:46:38 PM »
tales of woe

Bouncing of the post (Does Thailand keep you young) and chimera's opinion of thailand, might be a good idea to start a thread where people can express their tale of woe.

Myself, my first time spent here was a bit daunting, after having a small home built on the plot of land given by my wife's family, where the family lived also. It seemed like farang verses thai.

Here's the story.

I wasn't particularly interested in moving to thailand at the time, I was 3 months here 3 months Uk and so on for at least a couple of years. Mrs.t kept saying move to thailand, So i said i'll put one of my propertys up for sale move to thailand and give you 1 mil. when it sells.

So i put the property on the market 50 thousand pounds more than the valued price thinking it wouldn't sell. She kept saying it sell soon, i go budah as she was lighting another candle. Sure enough a year later i had a phone call from the agent whom i left the keys with informing me i had a buyer at almost the asking price.

So i kept my word, give her the 1 mil. I never seen so many vultures in my life, although she give her mum & dad 100,000.as our wedding present. Her brother borrowed 500,000 to buy a car and pay back monthly. He disappeared to bangkok for 5 months, We got the car back but we lost money on selling it.

No i wasn't happy then. They took her motorbike when they wanted to, Can i use your phone, Can i borrow this n that, it was never ending. She found it hard to say no to her family, so she give the rest of the money she had left back to me and said, I no have to them, then she got the silent treatment from them.

Oh! there's lot's more ie. take farang and go, fighting an all.

We moved away from the family and it took me some time, not to educate, but bring my wife round to my way of thinking. My children still don't forget and sided with there old "PAPA FARANG" bless them.

Thaiga   :cheers
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Roger

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Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #1 on: November 03, 2015, 05:50:58 PM »
Thaiga, I'm guessing the situation that you describe is not uncommon.
Every family and situation is different, but as a rule it may be better to set up home not too close to the Family of your Partner ........ ?
Maybe this should be a second point of advice to new arrivals to Thailand - to add to Chimera's comment this morning about renting a house for as long as possible before buying.
ATB
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #2 on: November 03, 2015, 06:33:37 PM »
That was many years ago roger, things are ok now, we are happy in the second home. The first home was a test and was very small, cost in them days only ½ a mil.

I think setting up home near the family is more of a security thing, the foreigner in a strange country would be thinking his wifes family would be taking care of him, not just his money and of course the lady wants to live where she feels secure as well.

Yes a second point of advice to new arrivals to Thailand, Not to set up home too close to the Family of your Partner.

Third point of advice  "DO NOT COME ON A WING AND A PRAYER" You need assets if anything goes wrong.
You need a back up plan.

Like chimera said  "he could write a book on the subject" me too. Be lucky m8.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
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Offline Roger

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Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #3 on: November 04, 2015, 05:22:32 AM »
Yes don't come on a wing and a prayer ! A Falang could live ok here on just say the UK state pension and some do - that's ok until maybe a relationship issue, accident or healthcare event arises.

A careful Guy myself and apparently fairly fit for a good age, mid-2013 I had to find B600K for a ticker operation - return to the UK was not really an option due to my condition. (I'm fine now).
You need to have an airfare in hand at the very least !

Another point on the 'rent don't buy' mantra. If you eventually feel secure enough to buy, (many many do and at some point get dispossessed), make sure you have a 'usufruct' which gives you the right to REMAIN in the property for as long as you live - it's easy and any Lawyer can set this up. Though not a complete practical guarantee of security, the existence of a usufruct is significant and will modify the thinking of your partner and her friends/family if things get tough. I was thankful to have a usufruct with drama on the home front last year.

Good Luck All
 
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Offline thaiga

Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #4 on: November 04, 2015, 03:36:23 PM »
Gulp! blimey roger that's a lota dosh - good to see your ok now.

But... i'm not sure returning to the uk would have been a good idea. I'm not sure on this but if your registered as an expat, i think you have to be living back in the uk for an amount of time before you can receive national health. Article here in the   Telegraph.co.uk

If you live abroad for more than three months you don’t automatically qualify for NHS treatment, even if you still have a UK passport.”  Those returning to the uk needed to be resident in Britain for at least six months before they could access NHS services. They would then need to register with a GP and be put on the waiting list for treatment, which could result in a further six to 12-month wait. :(

Stay healthy
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 
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Online jivvy

Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #5 on: November 04, 2015, 05:41:44 PM »
Quote
If you live abroad for more than three months you don’t automatically qualify for NHS treatment, even if you still have a UK passport.”  Those returning to the uk needed to be resident in Britain for at least six months before they could access NHS services. They would then need to register with a GP and be put on the waiting list for treatment, which could result in a further six to 12-month wait. :(

Unless you are an immigrant, then you would have  government departments queuing up to help you
 
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Offline Roger

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Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #6 on: November 04, 2015, 09:26:03 PM »
Thaiga. Yes I'd heard about that NHS restriction.
It is an absolute scandal that us 'Expats' don't receive the annual Pension adjustment AND have to face this NHS embargo on treatment. But I'm not sure that the NHS always stick to those rules - a friend got back to the UK last November after a stroke and and had a full set of tests and care .....
You are right to draw attention to this aspect and Jivvy, yes you're spot on with that comment about immigrants.
Bonkers Britain I say !
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #7 on: November 05, 2015, 11:43:12 AM »
Unless you are an immigrant, then you would have  government departments queuing up to help you
Yes jivvy everything stolen from under our feet  :-[ We are left with our fond memories
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Expats tales of woe
« Reply #8 on: November 05, 2015, 12:30:38 PM »
We are living in a world without honour for previous pledges

Roger going back to your remark - 'Expats' don't receive the annual Pension adjustment - i met a guy that claims he went on holiday for a couple of months to a country that doesn't have the adjustment penalty, he claimed the full amount whilst on holiday and the rate stayed the same when he returned to thailand, being frozen again on his arrival back at the new amount.

If that is the case and it's not b/s then if you had a holiday in the uk, you could do the same, again being
frozen on return but at the higher amount.

As all your traveling information is contained in the Advanced Passenger Information (API) which you give when you buy a ticket. So the authorities know exactly when someone leaves the country, and when they come back.

No way to treat an expat

Take the 102-year-old Annie Carr: she arrived in Australia in 1974 with a full pension of £6.12 per week. If she had stayed in Britain, or moved instead to the US, or to a country in the EU, or to any other country that negotiated a ‘reciprocal agreement’ with the UK back in the 1960s or 1970s, she would now be getting over £110 per week.

 new.spectator.co.uk
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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