Author Topic: Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors  (Read 945 times)

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Offline thaiga

Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors
« on: November 13, 2015, 03:13:52 PM »
Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors

The Education Ministry plans to recruit its first batch of 500 Thai teachers who teach English in state-run schools nationwide to undergo a "train-the-trainer" programme in a bid to reduce the cost of hiring foreign English teachers.

full article: Bangkokpost
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors
« Reply #1 on: November 13, 2015, 03:45:52 PM »
If they would pay Thai teachers better, more qualified Thai teachers would apply, more Thais would invest effort to become qualified teachers. As long as good graduates from English programs see better opportunities in business than in teaching, they will go for jobs in business and private schools.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

Offline thaiga

Re: Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2015, 02:07:53 PM »
From the bangkokpost.com/opinion

I’m not surprised the Ministry of Education found that out of 43,000 English teachers, only six were fluent in English “Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors”.

Teachers apply here

If we are finally getting serious about improving the English competency of our students, I suggest that we:

(a) make remedial classes available for teachers nationwide, perhaps using distance learning, to bring them up to par within, say, five years;

(b) evaluate and promote strictly based on merit, especially competence in teaching English as a second language; and

(c) require all Thai ESL teachers to sit the TOEFL exam annually, with average scores of ESL teachers in each school to be posted on the internet.

Using the TOEFL as our standard will prevent the ministry from setting a deliberately easy exam to save face - but for the first year, we could set the bar at say, 300 points, increasing it to 400 for year 2 and 500 for year 3 - still not enough to be considered for graduate programmes at many better American universities.

Making average scores public will enable parents to track the progress of each school, so they can see what they are paying for.

Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline Johnnie F.

Re: Ministry aims to cut foreign English tutors
« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2015, 03:37:51 PM »
I wonder how many Yanks and Brits etc. would pass that minimum requirement of 300 of the maximum 120 points TOEFL? Or is the author talking about the prior point system of the GRE (maximum 2400 total: Verbal, Quantitative and Analytical each 800 maximum, with mean scores at about 333 each)? As I can remember, the idiot level of that was less than a total of 800 for most graduate schools, or less than 1100 for Harvard etc.
Fun is the one thing that money can't buy
 

 



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