Author Topic: exam questions.If you have a sexual urge, what should you do  (Read 869 times)

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Offline thaiga

exam questions.If you have a sexual urge, what should you do
« on: February 21, 2012, 11:03:34 AM »
               Unanswerable exam questions have students scratching their heads

The questions in the Ordinary National Educational Test (ONet) have caused a stir again.
To many Mathayom 6 students, some of the questions on this year's test sounded rather stupid, with none of the multiple-choice answers given seeming to be correct. Some parents felt the questions test neither the knowledge nor the common sense of their children.

"If the question designers come up with such tests, how can we expect to see a bright future for our country?" asked one critic venting his frustration on a Web board.

A total of 397,177 students sat the O-Net tests last weekend, according to National Institute of Educational Testing Service (NIETS) director Samphan Phranphruek. The NIETS organises the O-Net tests; Mathayom 6 students take them seriously because their scores are a factor in the university-admission system.

However, as in years past, this year's examinees emerged from the exam rooms joking about the questions.

This year, O-Net questions for the Health Education subject have drawn criticism.

One of the multiple-choice questions asks, "If you have a sexual urge, what should you do?" The available alternatives are: a) Ask friends if you can play football together; b) Consult family members; c) Try to sleep; d) Go out with a friend of the opposite sex; or e) Invite a close friend to watch a movie together.

Critics pointed out that both "a" and "b" could be taken as correct answers for boys; furthermore, in the case of most girls, "a" would be a strange option, and therefore not a viable choice.

A large number of students also found the following question laughable: "Locals have found a bizarre item. It is round and soft. If it is not fed water, it shrinks and becomes a hard object. This hard object, when given water, will return to its soft, bigger condition. What is it?" The alternatives were: a) The egg of the Naga; b) The egg of a giant salamander; c) Quartz; d) Flour balls in milk tea; or e) Hydrogel.

"I guess this question was just for fun," a student said on condition of anonymity.
http://www.nationmultimedia.com/national/Unanswerable-exam-questions-have-students-scratchi-30176315.html
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

Offline thaiga

Re: exam questions.Answer for sexual relief is football
« Reply #1 on: February 24, 2012, 10:12:42 AM »
                                     Answer for sexual relief is football: NIETS chief

Saowanee Nimpanpayungwong
The Nation

BANGKOK: -- National Institute of Educational Testing Services (NIETS) director Dr Samphan Phanphrut yesterday defended questions included in the recent national test that have been widely criticised.

"The panels that designed the questions had clear objectives," Samphan said, "but of course, we welcome all comments".

This year, the Ordinary National Educational Test (Onet) for Health Education subject for Mathayom 6 students has drawn criticism and ridicule after young people posted on Web sites questions many found strange.

One question was, "If you have a sexual urge, what should you do?" The available alternatives were: a) Ask friends if you can play football together; b ) Consult family members; c) Try to sleep; d) Go out with a friend of the opposite sex; or e) Invite a close friend to watch a movie together.

Critics pointed out that both "a" and "b" could be taken as correct answers for boys; furthermore, in the case of most girls, "a" would be a strange option, and therefore not a viable choice.

However, Samphan yesterday said "a" was the correct answer.

He explained this question was intended to check whether the students understood the nature of sexual desire and how to control or respond to it.

"This question is a part of the content about sex education and family life," Samphan said.

He added that the question about "transvestic behaviour" - which also drew flak - was intended to test the memory of students because the term had been defined in their textbooks.

"In response to the criticism, I have invited the questiondesign panel for the Health Education subject to provide an explanation," Samphan said.

He explained NIETS had designed the questions for Onet in line with the curriculum of the Office of Basic Education Commission (Obec) and in response to indicators highlighted by Obec.

"Based on what is provided by Obec, our invited specialists have developed test blue prints and item specifications," Samphan said.

He said schoolteachers, school directors, chiefs of academic subjects at schools were recruited for workshops where they could improve the test blueprint and specific items.

"Obec teachers have taken part in the designing of the tests in all subjects," Samphan said.

He pointed out that Obec chose question designers from its pool of teachers and they came from various regions.

"After the teachers design the questions, university lecturers with expertise in those subjects then step in as speakers to advise and screen the questions," Samphan said. "After that, testdesign and screening committees for each subject will work out the final sets of questions for the tests".

A total of 397,177 students sat the ONet tests last weekend. Mathayom 6 students take the tests seriously because their scores are a factor in the universityadmission system.
Anyone who goes to a psychiatrist should have his head examined.
 

 



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